Wydawca: Siedmioróg Kategoria: Dla dzieci i młodzieży Język: angielski Rok wydania: 2012

Hansel and Gretel (Jaś i Małgosia) English version ebook

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

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Opis ebooka Hansel and Gretel (Jaś i Małgosia) English version - Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

Hansel and Gretel is the classic tale of a brother and sister who get lost in the forest with some surprising results. After being abandoned by their wicked stepmother in the forest, the two children try to find their way home. Suddenly they stumble upon every child's dream: a cottage made of candy! But inside lives a wicked witch who she is not as nice as she at first pretends to be and has an evil plan! Can Hansel and Gretel escape from the dastardly witch and find their way home? Packed with adventure and thrills, this is one story children won't forget in a hurry!

Opinie o ebooku Hansel and Gretel (Jaś i Małgosia) English version - Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

Fragment ebooka Hansel and Gretel (Jaś i Małgosia) English version - Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

At the edge of a great forest lived a poor but kindly woodcutter with his wife and two children; the boy was called Hansel and the girl, Gretel. Although the family was poor, the children loved to go into the forest near the cottage, playing hide and seek amongst the trees. They would marvel at the forest creatures and sometimes watch a fox run with her young cubs.

The stepmother was the woodcutter’s second wife, for sadly the children’s mother had died some years ago. They missed her dreadfully because the stepmother was a sharp and spiteful woman.

In the cottage there was little food and even less money. When prices were high, they lacked even dry bread to satisfy their hunger. The worried woodcutter could not sleep at night. He sighed heavily to his wife:

“What will become of us? How can we feed our poor children when we hardly have anything for ourselves?”

“This is a troublesome question, dear,” replied the stepmother. “But for every troublesome question, there is always a solution, even if it be a difficult one. Tomorrow at dawn, let us lead the children deep into the forest where the vegetation is thick; there we will start a fire, give each of them a piece of bread, and then we will go back to work and leave behind the children to fend for themselves. They will not manage to find their way back home, and thus we shall rid ourselves of them.”

“Oh no, my dear!” replied the woodcutter. “We cannot do such an evil thing. I would not have the heart to leave my children in the woods!”

“Oh, you