Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal -  - ebook

Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal ebook

0,0

Opis

A modern democratic society depends on the civic engagement of its citizens. Growing cultural pluralism and economic globalization have brought greater complexity to all areas of life. Young people in particular need diverse opportunities in order to enrich their experience, to learn about civic responsibility and to strengthen their communities. Furthermore, the topic is important since it shapes a path to overcome social inequalities in education and to use the untapped potential for-and declining interest in-political participation among youth. With the 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize for Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal the Bertelsmann Stiftung presents approaches in diverse countries and discusses how they meet the challenge to promote civic engagement in schools and early childhood education and care. The report also gives a short overview of the status quo of civic engagement in Germany and suggests some reforms for the future.

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 151

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
Oceny
0,0
0
0
0
0
0



© 2010 E-Book-Ausgabe (EPUB) © 2007 Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung, Gütersloh
Responsible: Michael Seberich with the support of Anna NiemannCopy editor: Birte Pampel, MunichTranslation: German Language ServicesProduction editor: Christiane RaffelCover design: Nadine HumannCover illustration: Uppercut Images/StrandperleTypesetting and Printing: Hans Kock Buch- und Offsetdruck GmbH, Bielefeld
ISBN : 978-3-86793-248-6
www.bertelsmann-stiftung.org/publications

www.bertelsmann-stiftung.de/verlag

Inhaltsverzeichnis
Titel
Impressum
Preface
Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal- Challenges in Germany
The need for action: discourse and discussions in Germany
The vision: engagement as an educational goal
References
Thriving Youth, Flourishing Civil Society- How Positive Youth Development ...
Theoretical and empirical foundations
Indicators of youth civic behaviors
Building real-world programs that promote PYD and civic contributions
Next steps
References
Finding Good Examples: An International Look at Strategies and Programs
Civic engagement as part of the educational agenda
Early childhood centers and schools as a reflection of society at large
Searching for good examples
Civic engagement as an educational goal: examples from selected countries
The top four
Participation as a strategy
References
Civic Engagement Doesn’t Exactly Sell Itself- Developments and Initiatives in ...
Civic education
Service learning
Civil society demands the educational objective
Policies Promoting Civic Engagement in the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg
Civic engagement as a policy focus
Nurturing diversity, ensuring coordination
Promoting civic engagement in concrete terms
Conclusion
References
An Example for Germany- Policies Promoting Civic Engagement in Great Britain
New Labour and the Third Way
New Labour for the new generation
Measures to promote political participation
Measures to promote volunteer work and charitable giving
Partnership for a strong civil society
References
New Initiatives and Directions for Promoting Civic Engagement Among Youth in Germany
Anchoring goals in policy
Developing a common understanding of education
Building networks
Developing management structures
Tailoring opportunities to the individual’s age and needs
Training and continuing education for childcare professionals and teachers
Developing a culture of cooperation
Valuing civic engagement
Identifing contact persons and mentors
Improving publicity about opportunities for involvement
Why an overarching strategy is needed
The Carl Bertelsmann Prize
The Authors
Bibliographic information published by the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek
The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available on the Internet at http://dnb.d-nb.de.
Preface
A society that is based on the values of freedom, solidarity and goodwill needs social capital. The cohesiveness that derives from these values is the prerequisite for a democracy that thrives over time. Social capital is created when citizens are willing to partner with and support each other within social networks. They need a foundation of trust from which civic engagement can evolve.
The 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize seeks ways to develop this trust as early as childhood and adolescence. Young people who get involved in their communities tend to stay involved, dedicating time, energy and financial resources to communal undertakings as adults. In this context, “civic engagement” denotes voluntary efforts by which young people contribute to democracy and the common good. Individual engagement, however, needs an institutional framework. Schools and facilities dedicated to early childhood education and care play a particularly crucial role here.
This year’s Carl Bertelsmann Prize takes up the topic “Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal,” putting educational policy and the advancement of civil society at center stage. In keeping with its international focus, the search committee investigated innovative policies and third-sector organizations in Brazil, Canada, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States. A committee of academic experts and practitioners supported and directed the selection process. This volume, published in conjunction with the awards ceremony, sets forth the results. In particular, it highlights this year’s winners: Great Britain’s Citizenship Foundation and the curriculum program “Themenorientiertes Projekt Soziales Engagement” (TOP SE, Topic-oriented Project on Civic Engagement) in the state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany.
The research leading up to the award demonstrates that civic engagement has already taken root as an educational goal in many localities. It is nurtured by dedicated educators, committed citizens, interested nonprofit organizations and concerned political leaders. As a result of their actions, many nations, states and communities have implemented programs, curricula and statutes that encourage civic engagement at an early age. While legislation does not guarantee better education, it can open up opportunities that allow all young people, regardless of their background, access to the crucial resource and important educational territory of community involvement.
The 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize once again impressively demonstrates that it will take more than a one-sided focus on cognitive learning to improve our educational system. Everything we have observed in the past months about the affect of civic engagement on children and adolescents underscores the importance of lessons and experiences that touch their lives. The recognition they receive when they get involved in the world around them contributes immeasurably to their development and self-confidence. Their awareness of what they have accomplished leads them in turn to assume responsibility. As this cycle of learning continues, they earn further recognition. Though this is not a new educational concept, many schools and early childhood centers have done little to put it into practice. The deliberate promotion of civic engagement offers the opportunity to anchor this cycle in our educational system.
This volume presents examples of international best practice, linking them with findings in the fields of pedagogy, developmental psychology and politics. The reports offer preliminary answers to a wide range of questions. These five key questions frame the investigation:
• How many young people participate in their communities, and under what conditions?
• What makes it so important to promote civic engagement at an early age?
• What role can educational institutions play in improving young people’s opportunities and skills for participation?
• What constitutes good practice when it comes to engaging children and youth in civic-minded endeavors?
• How can political and educational practice in this area be improved?
Attaining the educational goal of civic engagement is the joint responsibility of politics, business and the third sector. Without civic engagement, we would have no volunteers, no nonprofit organizations and no foundations, such as the Bertelsmann Stiftung. Without participation by citizens, democracy would stand on unsteady ground. We cannot let that happen. The 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize demonstrates ways to create new trust in democracy and the common good. But the excellent policies and programs described in this book are not the real starting point. The real starting point is a change in mindset-at long last, we must take young people seriously!
As we award the 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize on September 6, we acknowledge with gratitude the work of the selection committee, our youth advisory board and our research partners, the Institute for Organizational Communication (IFOK) in Berlin and the Education Development Center (EDC) in Boston. Within the Bertelsmann Stiftung, many colleagues have contributed to making this year’s Carl Bertelsmann Prize a success. We owe special thanks to the Carl Bertelsmann Prize project team.
Dr. Brigitte Mohn
Member of the Executive Board Bertelsmann Stiftung
Michael Seberich
Project Manager 2007 Carl Bertelsmann Prize
Civic Engagement as an Educational Goal- Challenges in Germany

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!