Deadwood Dick Jr. Branded. or Red Rover at Powder Pocket - Edward Lytton Wheeler - ebook

Deadwood Dick Jr. Branded. or Red Rover at Powder Pocket ebook

Edward Lytton Wheeler

0,0

Opis

Deadwood Dick is a fictional character who appears in a series of stories, or dime novels, published between 1877 and 1897 by Edward Lytton Wheeler. His stories are well plotted adventures and his slang and dialect heavy narration is funny as hell. Deadwood Dick was an orphan who was adopted, mistreated and then ran away from home to become a notorious outlaw. Originally from New England, he moved to the town of Deadwood, where he became the leader of a gang of highway men, wanted dead or alive for a $500 bounty. He is handsome, valiant, charming and sarcastic and sees himself as a defender of the weak. „Deadwood Dick Jr. Branded or Red Rover at Powder Pocket” is a fast-paced thriller. With its colorful narrative and surprising twists, the story will keep you hooked till the very end.

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
czytnikach Kindle™
(dla wybranych pakietów)
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 121

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS



Contents

CHAPTER I. THE GREAT HOLD-UP

CHAPTER II. DICK'S FRUITLESS RISK

CHAPTER III. CAPTAIN JOAQUIN'S CAPTURE

CHAPTER IV. REJECTING A PROPOSAL

CHAPTER V. TURNING THE TABLES

CHAPTER VI. CACHING THE TREASURE

CHAPTER VII. THE SECRET SHOT

CHAPTER VIII. CAPTAIN JOAQUIN'S RETREAT

CHAPTER IX. A CHANCE FOR HIS LIFE

CHAPTER X. DICK IN A DEATH-TRAP

CHAPTER XI. DICK'S ONLY DEFENSE

CHAPTER XII. CAUGHT IN THE TOILS

CHAPTER XIII. DEADWOOD DICK BRANDED

CHAPTER XIV. SUSANA TO THE RESCUE

CHAPTER XV. BANKER BROWN OF POWDER POCKET

CHAPTER XVI. THE FIRST BLOW STRUCK

CHAPTER XVII. THE SECOND BLOW FALLS

CHAPTER XVIII. THE THIRD STROKE

CHAPTER I

THE GREAT HOLD-UP

Toot!

“What’s the mischief?” cried the fireman.

He sprung to his box and looked ahead, and in the center of the track, where the train was rounding a point of rocks, saw a red flag.

“That fool of a section boss has got another rail up, on our time, I suppose, as he did once before,” growled the engineer, having shut off steam and applied the air brakes.

Toot!

Another short, sharp blast of the whistle, and the engineer reversed his engine, while the fireman leaped down and prepared to jump.

Both had beheld something well calculated to chill their blood, the moment the engine had rounded the bend far enough to give them a view of the straight stretch ahead!

About half way down to a point where the track again curved, a number of boulders had been placed between the rails, and on both sides of the track stood masked men with rifles in their hands. That they meant business was not to be questioned.

“Held up, by thunder!”

Such was the exclamation uttered by the engineer, as he reached for the whistle and sounded the second alarm, and, having reversed, as mentioned, he, too, prepared to jump.

But that was not necessary. As if the train robbers had calculated to the foot the distance from the curve at which to place the obstruction, they saw the train slow up, under the force of the powerful brakes, and when the engine stopped the nose of the pilot was but a score of inches from the boulders.

“Hands up, or take lead straight!”

So cried the leader, and a man on each side of the engine covered the engineer and fireman.

Needless to say, they promptly obeyed the order. At the same moment other members of the band made a dash for the express-car, which was next to the engine.

Still others had sprung up alongside the track the moment the train came to a standstill, and boarded the cars to take care of the passengers while the leader and those with him made their raid upon the car which contained the treasure they were after.

But, were they after any special treasure, or was it only a coincidence that they had chosen that particular train for their prey?

It looked the former.

“Looks like we’re in for it,” observed the fireman, as he held his hands on high.

“That’s what it does,” agreed the engineer, in easy manner of speech, taking care to keep his hands well up. “There is no use kicking when they have got us lined with Winchesters.”

“That’s hoss sense,” averred one of the raiders, who stood guard over them. “You fellers keep yer hands straight up, and you won’t come to no harm. We don’t want to harm nobody, ef we kin help it, so you mind what ye’ve been told and ye won’t git hurt.”

“Who is your captain?” inquired the engineer.

“Captain Joaquin.”

“The deuce you say! That settles it, Tom,” to the fireman. “We had better keep right on reachin’ skyward.”

“Et won’t be healthy fur ye ef ye don’t,” they were again warned. “Captain Joaquin is after the funds of the Castleville Bank, and he is bound to have ‘em at any cost.”

“The Castleville National Bank?”

“Jist so.”

“What have we got to do with the funds of the bank? Does he think they are in the express safe to-day?”

“He don’t think it; he knows it.”

“But, he is dreaming. What would the bank’s funds be on our train for?”

“The bank has closed up its business, to take effect at noon to-day, and the capital is on its way to San Francisco. But, it will never get thar.”

Perhaps the engineer and fireman did not notice it, but the Western twang and mannerism of this man’s speech were forced; it was evident that his natural speech was correct–that he was no border tough.

“Well, I guess nobody knew it,” the engineer commented.

“Oh, yes; Captain Joaquin knew of it,” assured the man, with a light laugh.

No more was then said, the engineer and fireman giving their attention to what was going on at the express car.

The messenger had refused to open the door when ordered to do so, and had already killed one man and wounded another, firing through the barred ventilator close up under the roof.

The robbers were preparing to use dynamite.

Back in the cars the others were holding up the passengers, but without any attempt at robbing them.

This, of itself, was proof that the express car was the objective point; they meant to risk nothing by attempting to make the robbery general.

By some accident, or by some passenger daring all to take the initiative, the robbers might lose control in one of the cars, and if that happened, and they kept the people in the cars together, they might be successful in beating the robbers off.

On the other hand, one man standing just within each door, with a cocked and leveled Winchester in hand, and his finger on the trigger, they had all the advantage in their favor, and might hold it as long as they desired.

Thus matters stood in the coaches, while events in the vicinity of the express car were coming to a climax.

Among the travelers in the smoking-car was one whom we must notice. About thirty years of age, he had keen, dark eyes, and hair that partook of the same shade and fell in a wave upon his shoulders.

He had a graceful mustache, and his regular features made him rather more than passably good-looking.

He was simply, almost roughly, clad.

At the first sound of the whistle he had started up, and had seemed to take an interest.

At the next alarm a couple of guns sprang to his hands, and he called on the others in the smoker with him to prepare for a possible attempt at robbery.

There were, perhaps, a score of men in that car.

Some of them drew guns, but when the train stopped and the masked men with their Winchesters appeared, the sight took all the bravery out of them.

The young man we have described, like the others, after a hasty look around to see what the others were doing, raised his hands, but the weapons remained close beside him on the cushion.

They were not allowed to leave their seats; all that was required of them was to sit still and keep their hands in sight.

This they did.

But there was a grim look on the face of the man described, as if he wanted only half an opportunity to act.

In all the cars the situation was the same, and presently to their ears came the sound of an explosion that could be felt as well as heard. The express car had been blown open.

Immediately following the explosion the report of a pistol rang out in the smoker, and the robber nearest the rear door dropped in his tracks. Another, and the one in front dropped his rifle and uttered a howl of pain, and all the men in the car looked in astonishment.

There stood the man we have mentioned, with both of his weapons in his grasp. So lightning quick had he acted that no one had detected him in the act until the shots were fired.

But he did not remain inactive.

“Follow me!” he called out to the others. “Back me up, and we will beat them off and cheat them yet. We are ten to their one, and they’ll be too rattled to shoot straight.”

He ran for the rear door, even while speaking, and some three or four made bold to follow him, with pistol in hand, but for the most part they hung back like cowards. Straight to that door, and out, and into the next car, where two more of the robbers were stationed.

Opening the door suddenly, this man clapped his revolver behind the ear of one of these, and commanded him to drop his gun, which, at the touch of the cold tube, the fellow promptly did. The other, however, at the other end of the car, brought his rifle up to his shoulder and gave warning that he was going to fire.

Before he could do so, however, for it required aim to avoid hitting his comrade, the traveler had thrown one arm around the neck of the robber he had disarmed, and, in a twinkling, let fly a snap shot from behind that living barricade and placed the fellow at the other end of the car hors de combat. The passengers sprang to their feet with a cheer, and it looked as if they were going to get the upper hand.

CHAPTER II

DICK’S FRUITLESS RISK

Deadwood Dick, Junior!

He it was who had, at the risk of his life, made this break to cheat the train-robbers.

“Follow me, every man of you who has a gun!” he called out to them. “We can do these fellows up in short order, if we go for them in the right manner. Who is with me?”

There was another cheer at that.

“We’re with you to a man!” some one shouted. “You lead the way, and see if we ain’t.”

“All right! Follow me, but if I go down, don’t let that check you; go right on and you will run clear over them by force of numbers. Now, then, here we go for them!”

With that, Dick dashed out of the doors and leaped to the ground, his brace of revolvers in hand ready to do execution.

He began firing the moment he touched the ground.

Two other fellows had followed, but, at the return fire from the outlaws, one of these fell dead and the other lost the use of an arm by a bullet.

Dick himself had the closest kind of a call, a bullet zipping past his face so close that he felt it touch his skin, taking away a strand of his long hair in its flight.

But that did not stop him even for an instant. Two men had already gone down before him, and now a third, and, had he been supported, the victory would have been easy; but those who had cheered the loudest were the first to draw back, when they saw the others drop.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.

This is a free sample. Please purchase full version of the book to continue.