An African Millionaire. Episodes in the Life of the Illustrious Colonel Clay - Grant Allen - ebook
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Colonel Cuthbert Clay is a master of disguise and an ingenious con man who sets his sights on the South African Millionaire, Sir Charles Vandrift, a millionaire owner of diamond mines in Africa. Each chapter brings new cringing on the reader’s part as we realize before Charles does that he is about to be a victim anew. As his South African diamond fortune takes hit after hit from the quick-witted master of disguise, the author leaves even the reader guessing: who can you trust? Colonel Clay has a female sidekick, Madame Picardet, whose charms are not wasted on Charles, no matter what appearance she takes. He repeatedly falls for her distractions as Colonel Clay primes him for the next sting. Twelve clever, extremely readable and entertaining tales about the „first important rogue in short crime fiction.” A classic of crime and adventure, Grant Allen’s „An African Millionaire” is perfect for fans of books such as „Arsene Lupin, Gentleman Thief”.

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Liczba stron: 328

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Contents

I. THE EPISODE OF THE MEXICAN SEER

II. THE EPISODE OF THE DIAMOND LINKS

III. THE EPISODE OF THE OLD MASTER

IV. THE EPISODE OF THE TYROLEAN CASTLE

V. THE EPISODE OF THE DRAWN GAME

VI. THE EPISODE OF THE GERMAN PROFESSOR

VII. THE EPISODE OF THE ARREST OF THE COLONEL

VIII. THE EPISODE OF THE SELDON GOLD-MINE

IX. THE EPISODE OF THE JAPANNED DISPATCH-BOX

X. THE EPISODE OF THE GAME OF POKER

XI. THE EPISODE OF THE BERTILLON METHOD

XII. THE EPISODE OF THE OLD BAILEY

I. THE EPISODE OF THE MEXICAN SEER

My name is Seymour Wilbraham Wentworth. I am brother-in-law and secretary to Sir Charles Vandrift, the South African millionaire and famous financier. Many years ago, when Charlie Vandrift was a small lawyer in Cape Town, I had the (qualified) good fortune to marry his sister. Much later, when the Vandrift estate and farm near Kimberley developed by degrees into the Cloetedorp Golcondas, Limited, my brother-in-law offered me the not unremunerative post of secretary; in which capacity I have ever since been his constant and attached companion.

He is not a man whom any common sharper can take in, is Charles Vandrift. Middle height, square build, firm mouth, keen eyes–the very picture of a sharp and successful business genius. I have only known one rogue impose upon Sir Charles, and that one rogue, as the Commissary of Police at Nice remarked, would doubtless have imposed upon a syndicate of Vidocq, Robert Houdin, and Cagliostro.

We had run across to the Riviera for a few weeks in the season. Our object being strictly rest and recreation from the arduous duties of financial combination, we did not think it necessary to take our wives out with us. Indeed, Lady Vandrift is absolutely wedded to the joys of London, and does not appreciate the rural delights of the Mediterranean littoral. But Sir Charles and I, though immersed in affairs when at home, both thoroughly enjoy the complete change from the City to the charming vegetation and pellucid air on the terrace at Monte Carlo. We are so fond of scenery. That delicious view over the rocks of Monaco, with the Maritime Alps in the rear, and the blue sea in front, not to mention the imposing Casino in the foreground, appeals to me as one of the most beautiful prospects in all Europe. Sir Charles has a sentimental attachment for the place. He finds it restores and freshens him, after the turmoil of London, to win a few hundreds at roulette in the course of an afternoon among the palms and cactuses and pure breezes of Monte Carlo. The country, say I, for a jaded intellect! However, we never on any account actually stop in the Principality itself. Sir Charles thinks Monte Carlo is not a sound address for a financier’s letters. He prefers a comfortable hotel on the Promenade des Anglais at Nice, where he recovers health and renovates his nervous system by taking daily excursions along the coast to the Casino.

This particular season we were snugly ensconced at the Hôtel des Anglais. We had capital quarters on the first floor–salon, study, and bedrooms–and found on the spot a most agreeable cosmopolitan society. All Nice, just then, was ringing with talk about a curious impostor, known to his followers as the Great Mexican Seer, and supposed to be gifted with second sight, as well as with endless other supernatural powers. Now, it is a peculiarity of my able brother-in-law’s that, when he meets with a quack, he burns to expose him; he is so keen a man of business himself that it gives him, so to speak, a disinterested pleasure to unmask and detect imposture in others. Many ladies at the hotel, some of whom had met and conversed with the Mexican Seer, were constantly telling us strange stories of his doings. He had disclosed to one the present whereabouts of a runaway husband; he had pointed out to another the numbers that would win at roulette next evening; he had shown a third the image on a screen of the man she had for years adored without his knowledge. Of course, Sir Charles didn’t believe a word of it; but his curiosity was roused; he wished to see and judge for himself of the wonderful thought-reader.

‘What would be his terms, do you think, for a private séance?’ he asked of Madame Picardet, the lady to whom the Seer had successfully predicted the winning numbers.

‘He does not work for money,’ Madame Picardet answered, ‘but for the good of humanity. I’m sure he would gladly come and exhibit for nothing his miraculous faculties.’

‘Nonsense!’ Sir Charles answered. ‘The man must live. I’d pay him five guineas, though, to see him alone. What hotel is he stopping at?’

‘The Cosmopolitan, I think,’ the lady answered. ‘Oh no; I remember now, the Westminster.’

Sir Charles turned to me quietly. ‘Look here, Seymour,’ he whispered. ‘Go round to this fellow’s place immediately after dinner, and offer him five pounds to give a private séance at once in my rooms, without mentioning who I am to him; keep the name quite quiet. Bring him back with you, too, and come straight upstairs with him, so that there may be no collusion. We’ll see just how much the fellow can tell us.’

I went as directed. I found the Seer a very remarkable and interesting person. He stood about Sir Charles’s own height, but was slimmer and straighter, with an aquiline nose, strangely piercing eyes, very large black pupils, and a finely-chiselled close-shaven face, like the bust of Antinous in our hall in Mayfair. What gave him his most characteristic touch, however, was his odd head of hair, curly and wavy like Paderewski’s, standing out in a halo round his high white forehead and his delicate profile. I could see at a glance why he succeeded so well in impressing women; he had the look of a poet, a singer, a prophet.

‘I have come round,’ I said, ‘to ask whether you will consent to give a séance at once in a friend’s rooms; and my principal wishes me to add that he is prepared to pay five pounds as the price of the entertainment.’

Señor Antonio Herrera–that was what he called himself–bowed to me with impressive Spanish politeness. His dusky olive cheeks were wrinkled with a smile of gentle contempt as he answered gravely–

‘I do not sell my gifts; I bestow them freely. If your friend–your anonymous friend–desires to behold the cosmic wonders that are wrought through my hands, I am glad to show them to him. Fortunately, as often happens when it is necessary to convince and confound a sceptic (for that your friend is a sceptic I feel instinctively), I chance to have no engagements at all this evening.’ He ran his hand through his fine, long hair reflectively. ‘Yes, I go,’ he continued, as if addressing some unknown presence that hovered about the ceiling; ‘I go; come with me!’ Then he put on his broad sombrero, with its crimson ribbon, wrapped a cloak round his shoulders, lighted a cigarette, and strode forth by my side towards the Hôtel des Anglais.

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