Summary: What's the Big Idea? - BusinessNews Publishing - ebook

Summary: What's the Big Idea? ebook

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The must-read summary of Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson's book: "What's the Big Idea? Creating and Capitalizing on the Best Management Thinking".This complete summary of the ideas from Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson's book "What's the Big Idea?" shows that when it comes to implementing new management ideas in an organisation, it's not the business gurus who really count. The most important people are the "idea practitioners" - the people who sort through the ideas, choose the right ones and then implement them. In their book, the authors explain how you can enhance your chances of success by taking advantage of new business thinking and putting more emphasis on building the ranks of idea practitioners. This summary is a guide to making a noticeable different to business operations by listening to the right people.Added-value of this summary:• Save time• Understand key concepts• Expand your business knowledgeTo learn more, read "What's the Big Idea?" and discover why you should start listening to the idea practitioners in your business in order to progress towards the future.

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Book PresentationWhat’s The Big Idea? by Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson

Book Abstract

About the Author

Important Note About This Ebook

Summary of What’s The Big Idea? (Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson)

1. Understand the roles of the three components of new business ideas

2. How to let new ideas flourish within your organization

Book PresentationWhat’s The Big Idea? by Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson

Book Abstract

MAIN IDEA

When it comes to implementing new management ideas in an organization, it’s not the business gurus who really count. The most important people are the “idea practitioners” – the people within your organization who sift through the pool of management ideas, choose the right ones and then do the real work of importing and implementing workable ideas.

To enhance your chances of success in taking advantage of new business thinking, put more emphasis on building the ranks of the idea practitioners within your firm and less emphasis on what the business gurus are saying. Therefore, rather than seeking more opportunities to sit at the feet of business gurus, build the skills of your idea practitioners. Encourage them to become highly skilled at ignoring the hype and focusing instead on superior business ideas which will be applicable and beneficial to your organization. Allow the idea practitioners to work with passion and sound reasoning to adopt sound new business ideas and your organization will leap forward towards the future. Conversely, in the absence of the discipline provided by idea practitioners, all that will happen is you will bounce uneasily from one management fad to the next without ever making any noticeable difference to your business operations.

“Business ideas serve two basic roles for organizations. One is to improve – or try to improve – organizational performance. They don’t always work, but new business ideas deliver to organizations improved cost, cycle time, financial performance, market share, and so forth, if implemented well. The other role business ideas play is to provide legitimacy. They indicate that an organization and the individuals within it are diligently attempting to improve their business – whether they truly are or not. Most writers on business ideas place the primary responsibility for the success of the ideas squarely on the shoulders of the business guru. If the idea is successful and becomes pervasive within organizations, it’s because the guru is a genius. If the idea is merely a fad, the guru is a goat. Instead, our primary focus is on the people within an organization who make ideas a reality. Unlike the gurus, these people have seldom been written about or even identified by other management thinkers, and there’s no real name for them. We’ve labeled them idea practitioners because they put ideas into practice and in turn have developed a practice of idea implementation. They also help to develop the ideas and in many cases are hybrid creator/practitioners.”

– Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson

“Regardless of whether you believe that pursuing new business ideas is a good approach or a poor one, most individuals have little ability to exclude them from their organizations altogether. The business ideas and advice industry is a large and pervasive one, and unless you work in a very small or remote company, you can count on these ideas playing a part in your organization. Therefore, it makes sense to try to identify and bring in only the ideas that are of most potential benefit and to make their impact as positive as possible. Idea practitioners put ideas into practice.”

– Thomas Davenport, Laurence Prusak and James Wilson

About the Author

THOMAS DAVENPORT is director of the Accenture Institute for Strategic Change, a research center. He is also professor of information technology and management at Babson College. Dr. Davenport is the author or coauthor of several books including The Attention Economy, Mission Critical and Process Innovation.

LAURENCE PRUSAK is a researcher and knowledge management consultant. He is the coauthor of In Good Company and Managing Information Strategically. He and Dr. Davenport also coauthored Working Knowledge and Information Ecology.

JAMES WILSON is a writer and researcher at the Accenture Institute for Strategic Change.

The Web site for this book is available atwww.accenture.com/bigidea.

Important Note About This Ebook

This is a summary and not a critique or a review of the book. It does not offer judgment or opinion on the content of the book. This summary may not be organized chapter-wise but is an overview of the main ideas, viewpoints and arguments from the book as a whole. This means that the organization of this summary is not a representation of the book.

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