Summary: Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State - BusinessNews Publishing - ebook

Summary: Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State ebook

BusinessNews Publishing

0,0
21,91 zł

Opis

The must-read summary of Andrew Gelman's book: "Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State: Why Americans Vote the Way They Do".This complete summary of "Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State" by Andrew Gelman, a prominent professor of statistics and political science, shows that in the 2000 and 2004 elections, George W. Bush captured the lower-income states in the South, while the Democrats took the richer states in the Northeast and West Coast. In his book, the author explains how the different parts of the country and the different income-level voters are split in their political voting. This summary examines this paradox and some of its potential variables, as well as explaining what this means for the future of American politics.Added-value of this summary:• Save time• Understand how levels of wealth and education motivate American states to vote how they do• Expand your knowledge of American politics and democracyTo learn more, read "Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State" and discover more about how American elections are heavily influenced by wealth distribution and levels of education in every state.

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi lub dowolnej aplikacji obsługującej format:

EPUB

Liczba stron: 18




Book Presentation: Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State by Andrew Gelman

Book Abstract

In the 2000 and 2004 elections, George W. Bush captured the lower-income states in the South and middle of the country, while the Democrats took the richer states in the Northeast and West Coast. Democrats are doing better in the richer parts of the country, but ironically, while these rich states have become more Democratic over time, rich voters have remained consistently more Republican than lower-income voters. Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State examines this paradox and some of the potential variables such as race, cultural issues, and religion, and what all this means for American politics.

About the Author

Andrew Gelman is a professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University. He is also the author of Teaching Statistics: A Bag of Tricks. He received the Presidents’ Award in 2003, awarded to the best statistician under 40.

Summary of Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State (Andrew Gelman)

Rich State, Poor State

In recent elections, poorer states have voted Republican and richer states have voted Democrat. Yet, amid all the noise about red and blue states, the truth is that rich voters continue to support the Republicans. In 2004, Bush received 62% support from voters making more than $200,000 annually, compared to only 36% from voters making less than $15,000. At the individual level, income continues to be an important predictor of the Republican vote. Therefore, since there are more poor and middle-income voters than rich voters, this variable would seem to favor the Democrats. However, the winner of the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections was Republican, not Democrat.

Throughout the 20th century, the Democratic Party has been considered the party of the lower classes and average Americans. Given the income predictor of voting, how is it possible for this rich-poor pattern to go in opposite directions between individuals and states?