Summary: The Transparency Edge - BusinessNews Publishing - ebook

Summary: The Transparency Edge ebook

BusinessNews Publishing

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The must-read summary of Barbara and Elizabeth Pagano's book: "The Transparency Edge: How Credibility Can Make or Break You in Business".This complete summary of the ideas from Barbara and Elizabeth Pagano's book "The Transparency Edge" shows that, in the wake of numerous high-profile business and accounting disasters, transparency delivers clear and compelling business benefits. In their book, the authors highlight the advantages of an honest and transparent management style and the nine key behaviors that are decisive in assessing the credibility of leaders. This summary will teach you the importance of intellectual honesty and the techniques that you can use to improve your leadership skills.Added-value of this summary:• Save time• Understand key concepts• Expand your business knowledgeTo learn more, read "The Transparency Edge" and discover why you should become a transparent company and become the best leader you can be.

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Book Presentation The Transparency Edge by Barbara Pagano and Elizabeth Pagano

Book Abstract

About the Author

Important Note About This Ebook

Summary of The Transparency Edge (Barbara Pagano and Elizabeth Pagano)

Book Presentation The Transparency Edge by Barbara Pagano and Elizabeth Pagano

Book Abstract

MAIN IDEA

In the wake of numerous high-profile business and accounting disasters, transparency – a “what-you-see-is-what-you-get” code of conduct and leadership style – delivers clear and compelling business advantages. Specifically, a transparent management style:

Increases your company’s credibility in the marketplace and amongst the pool of potential employees.Builds loyalty, especially amongst those who have to report directly to business managers who operate in a transparent manner.Helps you gain the trust and confidence of your superiors.

Successful transparency in business, however, doesn’t mean to simply “let it all hang out”. Rather, a survey of more than 2,300 executives in a number of industries highlighted nine key behaviors which determine the level of credibility in leaders:

About the Author

BARBARA PAGANO is the founder and president of her own consulting firm, Executive Pathways. She has personally coached more than 3,000 senior leaders and business owners on business credibility. She has also carried out an extensive research project with corporate leaders, which has assisted many to better align their behaviors with their corporate values.

ELIZABETH PAGANO also works at the same consulting firm. She specializes in assisting middle management. Previously, Elizabeth Pagano was an award-winning business reporter and columnist for a daily newspaper and numerous other publications.

The Web site for this book is atwww.transparencyedge.com.

Important Note About This Ebook

This is a summary and not a critique or a review of the book. It does not offer judgment or opinion on the content of the book. This summary may not be organized chapter-wise but is an overview of the main ideas, viewpoints and arguments from the book as a whole. This means that the organization of this summary is not a representation of the book.

Summary of The Transparency Edge (Barbara Pagano and Elizabeth Pagano)

1. Visibly demonstrate through your actions and decisions you are unerringly honest

Honesty is like the hub on the wheel of leadership. Whenever you decide not to share what you do know, tell your followers why. Quite simply, people who act honestly don’t have hidden agendas which complicate matters or cause problems.

If you’re credible, people will never question what you tell them. They will naturally and automatically anticipate that you’ll tell them the true facts in any and all situations. This is a challenge because often, you as a leader will be aware of information the rank-and-file employees don’t know about. If pressed or prodded, you may need to be evasive or vague which is not good for building relationships.

To come across as more open and honest with your co-workers or direct reports:

Don’t be afraid to say: “I’m sorry, but I just can’t discuss that right now.” That maintains your credibility whilst protecting the confidential information you are entrusted with.Tell people: “I am committed to being totally honest with you. I need some time to think about this before I can respond.”Make it safe for others to tell the blunt truth, even if it hurts. For example, hold a team meeting, and allow everyone to put in their two cents worth, regardless of their background or level of experience.When leading a meeting, ask some questions which will encourage candid discussion:What do we need to discuss that we’re afraid to mention?What issues are we trying to sweep under the table here?Are there other pieces to this puzzle we should look at?Take a “hot seat” approach – sit in front of your team members and ask them to help you develop a list of suggestions for improving your own performance. Be willing to consider these ideas and suggestions seriously enough to make the exercise worthwhile rather than superficial.Be consistent and diligent in keeping your co-workers informed about how difficult issues are being handled. In other words, fill in the blanks before the rumor mill has an opportunity to do it for you.Speak honestly and candidly when the timing is right – which usually means delivering criticism in private rather than in public settings. Praise, on the other hand, has the greatest impact when delivered in front of others.