Summary: Entrepreneuring - BusinessNews Publishing - ebook

Summary: Entrepreneuring ebook

BusinessNews Publishing

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The must-read summary of Steven C. Brandt's book: "Entrepreneuring: the Ten Commandments for Building a Growth Company".This complete summary of the ideas from Steven C. Brandt's book "Entrepreneuring" shows that the historical model for entrepreneurial success has been to start a business from scratch or with borrowed money, build it up and then sell out for a vast fortune. Today, however, some of the world’s most successful business founders stay with their companies well past the start-up stage. For these founders, the establishment of a thriving business which continues to innovate and grow year by year is more important than selling out. This summary exposes the 10 commandments for building a growth business. These commandments are based on the experiences of real-world companies which have been built from the ground up into the medium and large-sized operations of today. The historical call of the classical entrepreneur was once, "Be your own boss". The motivation of today’s entrepreneur is now more often, "Let’s build something new of value"; entrepreneuring is a way of life.Added-value of this summary: • Save time• Understand key concepts • Develop your business knowledge To learn more, read "Entrepreneuring" and discover practical advice and vital principles for ambitious entrepreneurs.

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Liczba stron: 27




Book Presentation:Entrepreneuring by Steven C. Brandt

Book Abstract

Important Note About This Ebook

Summary of Entrepreneuring (Steven C. Brandt)

The first commandment

The second commandment

The third commandment

The fourth commandment

The fifth Commandment

The sixth commandment

The seventh commandment

The eighth commandment

The ninth commandment

The tenth commandment

Book Presentation:Entrepreneuring by Steven C. Brandt

Book Abstract

Main Idea

The historical model for entrepreneurial success has been to start a business from scratch or with borrowed money, build it up and then sell out for a vast fortune. Today, however, some of the world’s most successful business founders stay with their companies well past the start-up stage. For these founders, the establishment of a thriving business which continues to innovate and grow year by year is more important than selling out.

The 10 commandments for building a growth company set out the philosophical foundation around which a high growth business can be developed. They are based on the experiences of real world companies which have been built from the ground up into the medium- and large-sized operations of today.

The historical call of the classical entrepreneur was once, “Be your own boss”. The motivation of today’s entrepreneur is now more often, “Let’s build something new of value”. Entrepreneuring is a way of life.

Important Note About This Ebook

This is a summary and not a critique or a review of the book. It does not offer judgment or opinion on the content of the book. This summary may not be organized chapter-wise but is an overview of the main ideas, viewpoints and arguments from the book as a whole. This means that the organization of this summary is not a representation of the book.

Summary of Entrepreneuring (Steven C. Brandt)

The first commandment

Main Idea

Limit the number of people who are involved in the management of a new company to those who can contribute directly to the achievement of the company’s objectives.

Supporting Ideas

The key to the long-term growth and profitability of any new business venture is directly dependent on the decisions of the management. Therefore, any new venture should not be handicapped by a large cast of shareholders and managers who are each trying to take the company in a different direction.

Some people get caught up in the enthusiasm of a new project who have little to offer and no proven experience in building a growth company. For example, friends or a long established lawyer or accountant may be invited to participate in the establishment of a new company. The problem comes when these invited participants have visions of future progress which conflict with the direction the company needs to go to make progress.

Another trap is that often these people are given stock in the new company in lieu of a salary. Then, if the person turns out to be incompetent or a hindrance to the ongoing operations, they are very hard to dislodge. Disgruntled early shareholders also seem to have a knack for being able to sell their share holding at the worst possible time for the new company, and almost invariably to the wrong people. It is far better to restrict stock ownership in the formative stages of the company’s growth to those people who are making a direct and unique contribution to the company’s operations.