CBAP / CCBA Certified Business Analysis Study Guide - Susan Weese - ebook

CBAP / CCBA Certified Business Analysis Study Guide ebook

Susan Weese

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The bestselling CBAP/CCBA study guide, updated for exam v3.0 The CBAP/CCBA Certified Business Analysis Study Guide, Second Edition offers 100% coverage of all exam objectives for the Certified Business Analysis Professional (CBAP) and Certification of Competency in Business Analysis (CCBA) exams offered by the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA). Detailed coverage encompasses all six knowledge areas defined by the Guide to Business Analysis Body of Knowledge (BABOK): Planning and Monitoring, Elicitation, Requirements Management and Communication, Enterprise Analysis, Requirements Analysis, and Solution Assessment and Validation, including expert guidance toward all underlying competencies. Real-world scenarios help you align your existing experience with the BABOK, and topic summaries, tips and tricks, practice questions, and objective-mapping give you a solid framework for success on the exam. You also gain access to the Sybex interactive learning environment, featuring review questions, electronic flashcards, and four practice exams to help you gauge your understanding and be fully prepared exam day. As more and more organizations seek to streamline production models, the demand for qualified Business Analysts is growing. This guide provides a personalized study program to help you take your place among those certified in essential business analysis skills. * Review the BABOK standards and best practices * Master the core Business Analysis competencies * Test your preparedness with focused review questions * Access CBAP and CCBA practice exams, study tools, and more As the liaison between the customer and the technical team, the Business Analyst is integral to ensuring that the solution satisfies the customer's needs. The BABOK standards codify best practices for this essential role, and the CBAP and CCBA certifications prove your ability to perform them effectively. The CBAP/CCBA Certified Business Analysis Study Guide, Second Edition provides thorough preparation customizable to your needs, to help you maximize your study time and ensure your success.

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CBAP®/CCBA™Certified Business Analysis

Study Guide

Second Edition

Susan Weese

Terri Wagner

Senior Acquisitions Editor: Kenyon Brown Development Editor: Mary Ellen Schutz Technical Editor: Peter Honebein, PhD Production Editor: Rebecca Anderson Copy Editor: Kim Wimpsett Editorial Manager: Mary Beth Wakefield Production Manager: Kathleen Wisor Executive Editor: Jim Minatel Book Designers: Judy Fung and Bill Gibson Proofreader: Nancy Carrasco Indexer: John Sleeva Project Coordinator, Cover: Brent Savage Cover Designer: Wiley Cover Image: ©Getty Images Inc./Jeremy Woodhouse

Copyright © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana

Published simultaneously in Canada

ISBN: 978-1-119-24883-5

ISBN: 978-1-119-24885-9 (ebk.)

ISBN: 978-1-119-24884-2 (ebk.)

Manufactured in the United States of America

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, or online at http://www.wiley.com/go/permissions.

Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: The publisher and the author make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this work and specifically disclaim all warranties, including without limitation warranties of fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales or promotional materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for every situation. This work is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional services. If professional assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for damages arising herefrom. The fact that an organization or Web site is referred to in this work as a citation and/or a potential source of further information does not mean that the author or the publisher endorses the information the organization or Web site may provide or recommendations it may make. Further, readers should be aware that Internet Web sites listed in this work may have changed or disappeared between when this work was written and when it is read.

For general information on our other products and services or to obtain technical support, please contact our Customer Care Department within the U.S. at (877) 762-2974, outside the U.S. at (317) 572-3993 or fax (317) 572-4002.

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Library of Congress Control Number: 2016957688

TRADEMARKS: Wiley, the Wiley logo, and the Sybex logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates, in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. CBAP and CCBA are registered certification marks of International Institute of Business Analysis. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.

Good luck to all the planners, crammers, and refreshers getting ready to sit for the CBAP® or CCBA™ business analysis certification exam!

Dedicated to my family, friends, and colleagues who put up with me spending so much time on this book.

—Susan

Lovingly dedicated to my niece, Jenna, for her generous spirit, keen analytic skills, and leadership acumen. Fueled by passion and purpose, blended with the right mix of values, skills and experience, I have no doubt her leadership influence will be felt around the world. And it all started with being an awesome Business Analyst!

—Terri

Acknowledgments

Thank you to Mary Beth Wakefield, Editorial Manager; Kenyon Brown, Senior Aquisitions Editor; Rebecca Anderson, Production Editor; Kim Wimpsett, Copy Editor; John Sleeva, Indexer; and Nancy Carrasco, Proofreader. Without all of their contributions and assistance, this book would never have made it to the presses. In particular, thank you to Development Editor Mary Ellen Schutz. Her attention to detail, requests for clarity, and questions about what was really meant kept me on target to produce the complete study guide you are reading right now. ME, if you were here with me, I would give you a big hug! Without your herding and nipping during the revision process, this book would never have become such a great product. Your gentle editing is subtle, targeted, and effective. Peter Honebein, your technical edits were right on target and made everything in this book better.

A big thank-you goes out to the founders and supporters of the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA™) and the team who developed the contents of the BABOK® Guide. I would also like to thank my colleagues and good friends, Ginger Sanchez, Peggy Oglesby, and Phil Bennett, for sharing their wonderful business analysis stories and ideas that became the basis for many tales in this book. Thanks also to Melisa Pearce of Touched by a Horse for sharing her barn project.

This book is the result of collaboration between Susan Weese and Terri Wagner. Susan authored the book. Terri reviewed text and lent her experience and expertise to parts of the overall project.

Finally, Little Man, thank you for lying on my computer every morning and helping me think through things. You are the prince of cats.

—Susan

My deepest gratitude to Susan for taking the helm and navigating these waters. Your dedication, talent, and wisdom never cease to amaze me. Thank you for all your hard work and perseverance masterfully integrating the many enhancements to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge into this updated study guide. I admire your professionalism and cherish your friendship!

—Terri

About the Authors

Susan Weese, PgMP, PMP, PRINCE2, MSPM, MoP Susan is a management consultant, curriculum designer, and professional speaker specializing in project management and requirements development process development and implementation for complex information technology projects. She started her work career as a software engineer, designing and developing complex mathematical algorithms for satellite and radar systems. Halfway through her work life, Susan crossed to the dark side of technology and became actively involved with managing programs, projects, large consulting organizations, and business processes. She is still having a blast and has never looked back.

Susan founded Colorado-based Rhyming Planet, Inc., in 2000 to motivate, lead, and enable technical and business professionals to accomplish their program and project goals. Susan is also an adjunct faculty member at Colorado State University, delivering courses on project management and the underlying competencies that turn good managers into great managers.

Terri Wagner (Aurora, CO) M.A., PMP, CSM is owner/managing member of Mentor Source, Inc., a Colorado-based project management consulting and training company. She has co-authored and been the technical editor for several project management and business analysis books, including the Project Manager Street Smarts (Wiley). She has also taught project management, portfolio management, program management, business leadership, interpersonal skills, quality management, and other topics to state agencies, governmental entities, corporate clients, and at the graduate level in the university system.

CONTENTS

Introduction

Assessment Test

Chapter 1 Foundation Concepts

What Is Business Analysis?

Reviewing the Business Analysis Core Concept Model (BACCM™)

Exploring the Business Analysis Knowledge Areas

Exploring Requirements

Understanding How This Applies to Your Projects

Perspectives on Business Analysis

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 2 Controlled Start: Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring

Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 3 Controlled Start: Strategy Analysis

Strategy Analysis

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 4 Overarching Tasks: Requirements Life Cycle Management

Requirements Life Cycle Management

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 5 Controlled Middle: Elicitation and Collaboration

Requirements Elicitation

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 6 Controlled Middle: Requirements Analysis and Design Definition

Requirements Analysis and Design Definition

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 7 Controlled End: Solution Evaluation

Solution Evaluation

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 8 Underlying Competencies

Essential Skills of Effective Business Analysts

How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Chapter 9 Five Perspectives on Business Analysis

The Agile Perspective

The Business Intelligence Perspective

The Information Technology Perspective

The Business Architecture Perspective

The Business Process Management Perspective

Understanding How This Applies to Your Projects

Summary

Exam Essentials

Key Terms

Review Questions

Appendix A Advice on Completing Your Exam Application

The Competency-Based Certification Model

CBAP

®

Experience Requirements

CCBA

Experience Requirements

Calculate Your Experience Hours

Additional Exam Eligibility Requirements

The Exam Application Process

Appendix B Knowledge Areas, Tasks, and Elements

Review the Six Knowledge Areas

Knowledge Areas, Tasks, and Elements

Appendix C Mapping Techniques, Stakeholders, and Deliverables to Knowledge Areas and Tasks

Techniques

Stakeholders

Deliverables

Appendix D Summary of Business Analysis Techniques

Business Analysis Techniques

Appendix E Summary of Business Analysis Outputs

Business Analysis Outputs

Appendix F Answers to Review Questions

Chapter 1: Foundation Concepts

Chapter 2: Controlled Start: Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring

Chapter 3: Controlled Start: Strategy Analysis

Chapter 4: Overarching Tasks: Requirements Life Cycle Management

Chapter 5: Controlled Middle: Elicitation and Collaboration

Chapter 6: Controlled Middle: Requirements Analysis and Design Definition

Chapter 7: Controlled End: Solution Evaluation

Chapter 8: Underlying Competencies

Chapter 9: Five Perspectives on Business Analysis

Advert

EULA

List of Tables

Introduction

TABLE 1.1

Chapter 1

TABLE 1.1

TABLE 1.2

Chapter 2

TABLE 2.1

TABLE 2.2

TABLE 2.3

TABLE 2.4

TABLE 2.5

TABLE 2.6

TABLE 2.7

TABLE 2.8

TABLE 2.9

TABLE 2.10

TABLE 2.11

TABLE 2.12

TABLE 2.13

TABLE 2.14

TABLE 2.15

TABLE 2.16

Chapter 3

TABLE 3.1

Table 3.2

TABLE 3.3

TABLE 3.4

TABLE 3.5

TABLE 3.6

TABLE 3.7

TABLE 3.8

TABLE 3.9

TABLE 3.10

Chapter 4

TABLE 4.1

TABLE 4.2

TABLE 4.3

TABLE 4.4

TABLE 4.5

TABLE 4.6

TABLE 4.7

TABLE 4.8

TABLE 4.9

TABLE 4.10

TABLE 4.11

TABLE 4.12

TABLE 4.13

Chapter 5

TABLE 5.1

TABLE 5.2

TABLE 5.3

TABLE 5.4

TABLE 5.5

TABLE 5.6

TABLE 5.7

TABLE 5.8

TABLE 5.9

TABLE 5.10

TABLE 5.11

Chapter 6

TABLE 6.1

TABLE 6.2

TABLE 6.3

TABLE 6.4

TABLE 6.5

TABLE 6.6

TABLE 6.7

TABLE 6.8

TABLE 6.9

TABLE 6.10

TABLE 6.11

TABLE 6.12

TABLE 6.13

TABLE 6.14

TABLE 6.15

TABLE 6.16

TABLE 6.17

TABLE 6.18

TABLE 6.19

TABLE 6.20

TABLE 6.21

TABLE 6.22

Chapter 7

TABLE 7.1

TABLE 7.2

TABLE 7.3

TABLE 7.4

TABLE 7.5

TABLE 7.6

TABLE 7.7

TABLE 7.8

TABLE 7.9

TABLE 7.10

TABLE 7.11

TABLE 7.12

TABLE 7.13

Chapter 8

TABLE 8.1

TABLE 8.2

Chapter 9

TABLE 9.1

TABLE 9.2

TABLE 9.3

TABLE 9.4

TABLE 9.5

TABLE 9.6

TABLE 9.7

TABLE 9.8

TABLE 9.9

TABLE 9.10

TABLE 9.11

TABLE 9.12

TABLE 9.13

TABLE 9.14

TABLE 9.15

TABLE 9.16

TABLE 9.17

TABLE 9.18

TABLE 9.19

TABLE 9.20

TABLE 9.21

TABLE 9.22

TABLE 9.23

TABLE 9.24

TABLE 9.25

Appendix A

TABLE A.1

TABLE A.2

TABLE A.3

TABLE A.4

Appendix C

TABLE C.1

TABLE C.2

TABLE C.3

TABLE C.4

TABLE C.5

TABLE C.6

TABLE C.7

TABLE C.8

TABLE C.9

TABLE C.10

TABLE C.11

TABLE C.12

TABLE C.13

TABLE C.14

TABLE C.15

TABLE C.16

TABLE C.17

TABLE C.18

TABLE C.19

Appendix D

TABLE D.1

Appendix E

TABLE E.1

TABLE E.2

TABLE E.3

TABLE E.4

TABLE E.5

TABLE E.6

List of Illustrations

Chapter 1

FIGURE 1.1

Relationships between knowledge areas

FIGURE 1.2

Requirements and design cycle

FIGURE 1.3

Classes of requirements

FIGURE 1.4

Mapping the

BABOK

®

Guide

to a generic life cycle

Chapter 2

FIGURE 2.1

Task summary: Plan business analysis approach.

FIGURE 2.2

Task summary: Plan stakeholder engagement.

FIGURE 2.3

Onion diagram

FIGURE 2.4

Task summary: Plan business analysis governance.

FIGURE 2.5

Task summary: Plan business analysis information management.

FIGURE 2.6

Task summary: Identify business analysis performance improvements.

FIGURE 2.7

The Shewhart cycle

Chapter 3

FIGURE 3.1

Task summary: Analyze current state.

FIGURE 3.2

A fishbone diagram offers the opportunity to analyze and discuss.

FIGURE 3.3

Task summary: Define future state.

FIGURE 3.4

Relating strategy and implementation

FIGURE 3.5

Task summary: Assess risks.

FIGURE 3.6

Task summary: Define change strategy.

Chapter 4

FIGURE 4.1

Responding to changing requirements

FIGURE 4.2

Task summary: Trace requirements.

FIGURE 4.3

Task summary: Maintain requirements.

FIGURE 4.4

Task summary: Prioritize requirements.

FIGURE 4.5

Task summary: Assess requirements changes.

FIGURE 4.6

Task summary: Approve requirements.

FIGURE 4.7

A framework for configuration management

Chapter 5

FIGURE 5.1

Task summary: Prepare for elicitation.

FIGURE 5.2

Task summary: Conduct elicitation activity.

FIGURE 5.3

Applying the elicitation techniques

FIGURE 5.4

Task summary: Confirm elicitation results.

FIGURE 5.5

Task summary: Communicate business analysis information.

FIGURE 5.6

Task summary: Manage stakeholder collaboration.

Chapter 6

FIGURE 6.1

Task summary: Specify and model the requirements.

FIGURE 6.2

Gane-Sarson and Yourdon models for Palmer Divide

FIGURE 6.3

ERDs and class diagrams for Palmer Divide

FIGURE 6.4

Workflow mode for Palmer Divide

FIGURE 6.5

Summary-level use-case diagram for Palmer Divide

FIGURE 6.6

Task summary: Verify the requirements.

FIGURE 6.7

Task summary: Validate the requirements.

FIGURE 6.8

Task summary: Define requirements architecture.

FIGURE 6.9

Task summary: Define design options.

FIGURE 6.10

Task summary: Analyze potential value and recommend solution.

Chapter 7

FIGURE 7.1

Task summary: Measure solution performance.

FIGURE 7.2

Task summary: Analyze performance measures.

FIGURE 7.3

Task summary: Assess solution limitations.

FIGURE 7.4

Task summary: Assess enterprise limitations.

FIGURE 7.5

Task summary: Recommend actions to increase solution value.

Chapter 8

FIGURE 8.1

Lines of communication

Guide

Cover

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Introduction

The content of this book revolves around A Guide to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge®(BABOK®Guide) Version 3.0, published in 2015 by the IIBA™ headquartered in Toronto, Canada. You will notice references to the BABOK®Guide throughout this book. Its contents drive the discussions on performing successful business analysis work across the project life cycle. In some cases, certain phrases are used verbatim to ensure strict conformance with the BABOK®Guide. Both certification exams focus on the contents of the BABOK®Guide. Consider getting a copy of the guide to assist you while you are using this book to prepare you for the exams.

The book contains many hints and tips about preparing for and passing the exam and using what you have learned in your everyday work. The first tip for anyone wanting to become familiar with the BABOK®Guide is that you need to learn its language. Speaking this language gives you a common business analysis language, regardless of the industry or organization you work in. The terms and definitions found there may be different from the terms and definitions you use at work. So, your first step is to familiarize yourself with the terms and definitions so you are comfortable with BABOK®Guide–speak.

The second tip is that you need to be familiar with the six knowledge areas defined in the BABOK®Guide. These knowledge areas divide your business analysis knowledge and skills into six common areas. You will start with the high-level definitions and then drill down into the detailed tasks and techniques that successful business analysts use to get the job done. Let’s move on and talk a little bit about the focus of this book.

What You Will Learn

This book helps you prepare to take the CBAP® or CCBA™ certification exam. The CBAP® exam is designed for experienced business analysts, while the CCBA™ exam targets people who have less experience in the business analysis profession. Reading this book does not guarantee that you will pass the exam, but ideally you will find its contents motivating and helpful.

In the new certification exam structure, the CCBA™ exam provides less experienced business analysts with their first step toward obtaining the CBAP® designation. This exam targets individuals who are proficient in some aspects of business analysis, are in the process of developing business analysis skills and expertise, and who apply business analysis to smaller scope projects and less complex tasks. The CCBA™ certification expires after five years. The expectation is that you will then apply to take the CBAP® exam when you have gained more business analysis experience. You can also retake the CCBA™ exam if you have not yet met the required CBAP® exam level of business analysis experience.

What Is Covered in This Book

The CBAP®/CCBA™: Certified Business Analysis Study Guide, Second Edition follows a simple project life cycle frequently used as the basis for many projects. The life cycle consists of three high-level phases.

Controlled start, where you plan for your project’s business analysis activities and define the scope of the new solution your project will create

Controlled middle, where the project work is actually being performed to define, design, and build the new solution

Controlled end, when you wrap up your work activities and transition the new solution into operational use

The knowledge areas of the BABOK®Guide are placed within these three life cycle phases in order to work through the business analysis tasks and techniques from project start to end.

To get the most out of this book, you should read each chapter from start to finish and then check your memory and understanding with the chapter-end elements. Even if you’re already familiar with a topic, you should skim the chapter; business analysis is complex. There are often multiple ways to accomplish a task, and you may learn something even if you’re already competent in an area.

Chapter 1, “Foundation Concepts,”

lays the groundwork for navigating and understanding the content and intent of the

BABOK

®

Guide

. This chapter gives you a high-level look at what it means to be a business analyst and reviews the underlying competencies of the business analyst, the key business analysis stakeholders, and the

BABOK

®

Guide

requirements classification scheme.

Chapter 2, “Controlled Start: Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring,”

takes you through planning the business analysis activities for your project using tasks from your first knowledge area. To achieve a controlled start to a project or project phase, you must plan what needs to be done, how to go about doing it, and who needs to be involved with the work.

Chapter 3, “Controlled Start: Strategy Analysis,”

steps you through translating your organization’s business strategy into a proposed new business solution. During your project’s controlled start, you will define and document the business requirements for your project. The business requirements justify why a particular project should be initiated to address a particular business need.

Chapter 4, “Overarching Tasks: Requirements Life Cycle Management,”

focuses on ensuring that the right people are involved with developing, understanding, and approving the project requirements. In addition, your project requirements must be accessible and managed during your requirements development work and throughout the project life cycle.

Chapter 5, “Controlled Middle: Elicitation and Collaboration,”

guides you through gathering, organizing, and understanding the necessary information to develop the business, stakeholder, solution, and transition requirements for your project, and understanding what your project stakeholders need from the new solution.

Chapter 6, “Controlled Middle: Requirements Analysis and Design Definition,”

takes your elicited requirements information and makes sense of it. The tasks in this knowledge area focus on analyzing the stated requirements from your elicitation efforts and building the real stakeholder or solution requirements for your project.

Chapter 7, “Controlled End: Solution Evaluation,”

focuses on assessing proposed solutions, allocating requirements to solution components, and validating the solution to make sure that it will meet the business need and deliver value to the organization and its stakeholders.

Chapter 8, “Underlying Competencies,”

defines the core framework of business, technical, and domain knowledge possessed by effective business analysts. Your core framework of knowledge is enhanced by your management, interpersonal, business, and structured problem-solving skills.

Chapter 9, “Perspectives,”

steps through five perspectives on business analysis. You will dig into business analysis work on agile, business intelligence, information technology, business architecture, and business process management projects.

Appendix A, “Advice on Completing Your Exam Application,”

examines the required qualifications and application process for successfully completing and submitting your application to sit for the CBAP

®

or CCBA

certification exam.

Appendix B, “Knowledge Areas, Tasks, and Elements,”

lists the knowledge areas, tasks, and elements to assist you in your study efforts.

Appendix C, “Mapping Techniques, Stakeholders, and Deliverables to Knowledge Areas and Tasks,”

provides you with a coverage matrix mapping business analysis techniques, deliverables, and stakeholders to the knowledge area tasks that use them.

Appendix D, “Quick Summary of Business Analysis Techniques,”

provides you with brief descriptions of each business analysis technique in the

BABOK

®

Guide.

Appendix E, “Quick Summary of Business Analysis Deliverables,”

provides you with brief descriptions of each deliverable produced as a business analysis task output in the

BABOK

®

Guide.

Appendix F, “Answers to Review Questions,”

contains both the answers and explanations for the chapter review questions.

Glossary:

A glossary of terms is available with the online testing materials in PDF format.

BABOK

®

Techniques Matrix:

Maps of techniques, stakeholders and deliverables across the knowledge area tasks are available for download in Microsoft Excel format.

How to Become CBAP®/CCBA™ Certified

The CBAP® and CCBA™ certification exams each address all six knowledge areas from the BABOK®Guide. The exams also test your knowledge of sources referenced by the BABOK®Guide and your own business analysis experience.

The CBAP® exam is designed for experienced business analysts, while the newer CCBA™ exam targets folks who have less experience in the business analysis profession. You can apply and pay for the exams online using the IIBA™ website. Most people schedule and take the exams in a testing center and complete the questions on a computer. Feedback is immediate as to whether you have passed or failed the exam once you submit your finished set of questions. Let’s take a look at each exam in a bit more detail.

More on the CBAP® Exam

The CBAP® exam targets experienced business analysts. The exam contains 150 questions that must be answered within 3.5 hours. The questions you will be facing are based on Bloom’s Taxonomy, which is discussed later in this section.

Requirements for candidates sitting the CBAP® exam include 7,500 hours of business analysis work experience in the last 10 years, demonstrated experience and expertise in four of the six knowledge areas, a high-school education or equivalent, and 21 hours of business analysis-related professional development in the last four years. You will also be required to provide two references from a career manager, client, or CBAP®. These requirements to take the exam are discussed in detail in Appendix A, “Advice on Completing Your Exam Application.”

More on the CCBA™ Exam

The CCBA™ exam provides newer, less experienced business analysts with their first step toward obtaining the CBAP® certification. This exam targets individuals who are proficient in some aspects of business analysis, are in the process of developing business analysis skills and expertise, and who apply business analysis to smaller scope and less complex tasks and projects.

Requirements for candidates taking the CCBA™ exam include a minimum of 3,750 hours of business analysis work, aligned with the BABOK®Guide, in the last seven years with at least 900 hours in two of the six knowledge areas or 500 hours in four of the six knowledge areas, a minimum of 21 hours of Professional Development, and a high-school education or equivalent. You will also be required to provide two references from a career manager, client, or CBAP®.

The CCBA™ certification expires after five years. The expectation is that recipients will then apply to take the CBAP® exam as a more experienced business analyst. There is also an option to retake the CCBA™ exam if you have not yet met the required CBAP® exam level of experience during that time period.

What’s on the Exams

Both CBAP® and CCBA™ exams contain 150 questions that must be answered within 3.5 hours. The passing mark for your scored exam is calculated based on psychometric procedures that the IIBA™ does not disclose to the public. The CBAP® and CCBA™ Exam Blueprints indicate the relative weight of each knowledge area by providing you with the percentage of questions from that knowledge area on your exam. The percentages are provided for you in Table 1.1. Because of rounding issues, some of the percentages do not add up to exactly 100 percent.

TABLE 1.1 Exam knowledge area and question breakdown

Knowledge Area

CBAP

®

Exam % of Questions

CCBA

Exam % of Questions

Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring

14%

12%

Elicitation and Collaboration

12%

20%

Requirements Life Cycle Management

15%

18%

Strategy Analysis

15%

12%

Requirements Analysis and Design Definition

32%

30%

Solution Evaluation

14%

6%

All the questions on your exam are multiple-choice questions with four possible answers from which to select. There are no penalties for incorrect answers, so remember to attempt to answer every question.

Types of Questions

In 1956, Benjamin Bloom, an educational psychologist at the University of Chicago, proposed his Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, classifying learning objectives into six hierarchical levels: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. This taxonomy drives the structure and style of the exam questions you will be seeing on your CBAP® and CCBA™ exams, as the questions will range across this entire taxonomy. Questions may also have a scenario for reading before the body of one or more questions.

The breakdown of questions across Bloom’s Taxonomy is not provided in the IIBA™’s exam blueprint. As a rule of thumb, you should expect to see approximately 70 percent to 80 percent of your questions taken from the easier question types (knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis) in the taxonomy and 20 percent to 30 percent taken from the more difficult question types (synthesis and evaluation).

If you are able to recognize the type of question you are being asked, you can use this recognition to arrive at the correct answer to that question. Let’s take a look at each question type in more detail:

Knowledge Questions Knowledge questions test your ability to know specific facts and recall information that you have learned. This information may be straight from the BABOK®Guide, or it may be something you have learned from another source. These questions are straightforward and remind us of the traditional multiple-choice questions from exams we took in our younger days. Here is an example of a knowledge question:

Which type of requirement describes high-level organizational needs?

Business

Stakeholder

Functional

Transition

This is a “define the term” question, and the correct answer is A. As stated in the BABOK® Guide glossary, business requirements describe the higher-level business rationale for your project or initiative. Answering this question correctly requires you to recall the definitions for the different types of requirements found in the BABOK® Guide.

Exam Spotlight

Notice that the wording of the question and the correct answer may not be word for word from the BABOK®Guide. This is something you will commonly see in the certification exams, so be sure that you understand what you are learning versus simply memorizing the information.

Comprehension Questions Comprehension questions require you to interpret facts and understand meanings. This is a step up from a knowledge question, where simple memorization and recall usually provide you with the correct answer. Here is an example of a comprehension question:

What type of requirements contains the environmental conditions of the solution?

Transition requirements

Stakeholder requirements

Business requirements

Solution requirements

This is a “check your understanding” question, and the correct answer is D. As stated in the BABOK® Guide glossary, solution requirements include both functional and nonfunctional requirements for a particular project. This question requires understanding of the requirements types found in the BABOK® Guide and the knowledge that environmental conditions are nonfunctional requirements, which are a subset of the solution requirements.

Exam Spotlight

Notice that all of the answers in this example deal with the actual classes of requirements found in the BABOK®Guide. There are no distracter answers that jump up and tell you they are incorrect. Each possible answer is something you have been studying. Beware of the distracter answers that are good answers, and make sure you know the correct answer for the question you are being asked!

Application Questions Application questions raise the bar a bit more by asking you to use information to solve problems. These questions take your knowledge and comprehension, combine them, and ask you to do something with the result. Here is an example of an application question:

Transition requirements are typically prepared after which requirements document is completed?

Solution requirements

Stakeholder requirements

Business requirements

System requirements

This is a “use the information” problem asking you about the logical sequence for developing the types or classes of requirements on a project. Be sure to answer using the BABOK® Guide classification scheme and a generic life cycle versus answering from your organization’s scheme and life cycle models unless they are exactly the same. The correct answer is A. Once the solution requirements are defined, the transition requirements for the solution can be built.

Exam Spotlight

Watch for the modifiers in your exam questions, such as most, least, best, or worst. They add difficulty to the question as they ask you to select the correct answer that falls at the appropriate end of this sliding scale—best versus worst or least versus most. That usually means all of the answers are correct, but some answers may be more or less correct than others.

Analysis Questions Analysis questions are a bit more difficult to navigate. This question type asks you to recognize patterns and seek hidden meanings in the information you are provided. A common type of analysis question is looking at and analyzing a series of process or activity-related steps performed by the business analyst. Here is an example of an analysis question:

To capture the process of provisioning a circuit, the business analyst observed an ordering supervisor for half a day. The resulting information could then be incorporated into all of the following types of requirements except:

Transition requirements

Solution requirements

Stakeholder requirements

Functional requirements

This question is a pattern question focusing on a recommended series of steps to be followed by the business analyst who is using observation as a technique to elicit or analyze project requirements. The twist is that you are looking for the wrong answer this time around. The correct (wrong) answer is A. The solution capability is not usually found in the transition requirements for a solution.

Exam Spotlight

Watch for the positives and negatives in your exam questions, such as not or except. If you miss the negative, it is easy to get an answer wrong, even for a question to which you know the answer.

Synthesis Questions Synthesis questions test your ability to relate facts and draw conclusions based on the information you are given. Here is an example of a synthesis question:

After reviewing the existing process to approve a new cell phone order, Ginger realized that the senior manager is not always available to manually approve the purchase. She documented the capabilities that facilitate a faster ordering approval process relative to the existing situation. She felt that the existing process was inefficient and that it needed to be changed. What would be an appropriate way for Ginger to express the cause of the current cell phone ordering delays?

Blame the manual process for the inefficiencies.

State all of the facts in a neutral manner.

Express opinions on how to fix the process.

Insist that approvers adhere to strict deadlines.

You are being asked to “draw a conclusion” based on the specific scenario you have been provided within the body of the question. Ginger is being asked to effectively use her underlying competencies as a business analyst to solve a problem. Her best choice is to confront the problem and lay out all the information for the decision makers to analyze and then decide what to do. The correct answer is B.

Exam Spotlight

Watch for too much information. Occasionally (as in the previous question statement) more information is given than is needed to answer the question correctly. Don’t let extra, unrelated information lead you to select an incorrect answer or waste too much time on a particular question.

Evaluation Questions Evaluation questions expect you to assess ideas and make reasoned judgments. Take a look at the following example of an evaluation question:

To document why your project was initiated, it is appropriate to include the:

Business case

Project mandate

Solution approach

Business goals

This is a “reasoned judgment” style of question based on what you know and the fact that you understand what is required in this particular situation. Typical business analysis documents used to initiate a project are created in the Strategy Analysis knowledge area and include the business case, required capabilities, solution scope, and business need. The correct answer is A.

Exam Spotlight

When you are taking the exam, make sure you are able to read the questions and possible answers swiftly but accurately. You need to understand what the question is about before you can select the correct answer. Adult readers are notorious for skimming, scanning, and searching when they read. This can cause you to jump to selecting the wrong answer based on what you think you just read. Train yourself out of these bad habits and learn to read the actual question being presented.

Remember that you will face 150 questions of various question types on your CBAP® or CCBA™ exam. You need to navigate these questions efficiently and effectively to achieve a passing score on your exam. Although there is no substitute for knowing and understanding how the BABOK®Guide says you should do your business analysis job, your comfort with question types may also be of assistance.

How to Use This Book

The book includes several testing features, both in the book and available for download. Following this introduction is an assessment test that you can use to check your readiness for the actual exam. Take this test before you start reading the book. It will help you identify the areas you may need to brush up on. The answers to the assessment test appear after the last question of the test. Each answer includes an explanation and a note telling you in which chapter this material appears.

An “Exam Essentials” section appears at the end of every chapter to highlight the topics you’ll most likely find on the exam and help you focus on the most important material covered in the chapter so that you’ll have a solid understanding of those concepts. However, it isn’t possible to predict what questions will be covered on your particular exam, so be sure to study everything in the chapter.

Review questions are also provided at the end of every chapter. You can use these to gauge your understanding of the subject matter before reading the chapter and to point out the areas in which you need to concentrate your study time. As you finish each chapter, answer the review questions and then check to see whether your answers are correct—the correct answers appear in Appendix F. You can go back to reread the section that deals with each question you got wrong to ensure that you answer the question correctly the next time you are tested on the material. If you can answer at least 80 percent of the review questions correctly, you can probably feel comfortable moving on to the next chapter. If you can’t answer that many correctly, reread the chapter, or the section that seems to be giving you trouble, and try the questions again.

Don’t rely on studying the review questions exclusively as your study method. The questions you’ll see on the exam will be different from the questions presented in the book. There are 150 randomly generated questions on the CBAP® exam and the CCBA™ exam, so it isn’t possible to cover every potential exam question in the “Review Questions” section of each chapter. Make sure you understand the concepts behind the material presented in each chapter and memorize all the formulas as well.

Finally, you will notice various “Real World Scenario” sidebars throughout each chapter. These are designed to give you insight into how the various tasks and knowledge areas apply to real-world situations.

Interactive Online Learning Environment and Test Bank

The interactive online learning environment that accompanies the CBAP®/CCBA™: Certified Business Analysis Study Guide, Second Edition provides a test bank with study tools to help you prepare for the certification exam—and increase your chances of passing it the first time! The online test bank runs on multiple devices. It includes the following:

Sample Tests All the questions in this book are provided, including the assessment test at the end of this introduction and the chapter tests that include the review questions at the end of each chapter. Use these questions to test your knowledge of the study guide material. In addition, there are two CBAP bonus practice exams with 50 questions each, as well as two CCBA bonus practice exams with 50 questions each. Take these practice exams just as if you were actually taking the exams (that is, without any reference material). When you have finished the first exam, move on to the next exam to solidify your test-taking skills. If you get more than 85 percent of the answers correct, you’re ready to take the real exam.

Flashcards The online text bank includes more than 100 flashcards specifically written to hit you hard, so don’t get discouraged if you don’t ace your way through them at first. They’re there to ensure that you’re really ready for the exam. And no worries—armed with the review questions, practice exams, and flashcards, you’ll be more than prepared when exam day comes. Questions are provided in digital flashcard format (a question followed by a single correct answer). You can use the flashcards to reinforce your learning and provide last-minute test prep before the exam.

Other Study Tools A glossary of key terms from this book is available as a fully searchable PDF. A BABOK® Techniques Matrix is also available as an Excel spreadsheet.

Go to www.wiley.com/go/sybextestprep to register and gain access to this interactive online learning environment and test bank with study tools.

Test Taking Tips And Advice

On your exam day, it is important that you be relaxed, psychologically prepared, and confident. Try to be well rested and adequately nourished when you take the exam. Staying up all night before the exam for some last-minute studying is not a good idea.

It is a good idea to make sure you know the location of your testing center prior to exam day. We suggest that you do a “drive by” of the location so you know where you are going and exactly how to get there. You should also call the day before to confirm your exam date and time and the hours of operation. A friend, Peggy, showed up at her testing center to sit a certification exam only to discover that the testing center location had been moved the week before. Peggy had to rush to the other location and then begin the exam. Luckily, Peggy was an early bird, so the damage was minimal. The testing center staff told her that she had been notified of this testing center relocation by email, but Peggy could find no message from them in her inbox. Try to avoid that kind of last-minute stress if you can.

When you arrive at the testing center, you will have to lock up your personal belongings in a locker or leave them in your car for the duration of your exam. You cannot take any food or beverages into the exam, so they must be consumed ahead of time or stored in the locker as well. Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to drink that extra-large latte with four shots of espresso in it. The testing center staff will provide you with scratch paper and pencils. They will also take you into the testing area, seat you at your computer, provide you with headphones to muffle the noise, and confirm that the correct exam is being provided to you.

You have some time before the exam must start if you take the tutorial on how to use the exam software. We recommend that you take the tutorial even though you already know how to point and click. You can use this time to jot down any cheat sheet notes on the scrap paper that you have prepared prior to the exam. Of course, these notes and reminders must all be in your head since you can’t take your own paper into the testing area.

Be aware that there might be other people in the testing area taking a wide variety of exams, so people may come and go during your testing window. If you are easily distracted, this activity may take your attention away from your exam. You may take a break at any time during your exam; however, the timer keeps going while you are away from your seat.

How to Contact the Author

Feedback about this book is welcome. If you have specific questions or comments, please send a message to Susan Weese at [email protected] You can also post questions and comments on Susan’s exam-focused blog at cbapccba.blogspot.com. Her blog offers CBAP® and CCBA™ exam advice and support. Sybex strives to keep you supplied with the latest tools and information you need for your work. Please check the book’s update page on the Sybex website at www.sybex.com/go/cbap. Additional content and updates that supplement this book will be posted if the need arises.

CBAP®/CCBA™: Certified Business Analysts Study Guide BABOK® Guide Version 3.0 Knowledge Areas and Underlying Competencies

Knowledge Area

Chapter

Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring

Plan Business Analysis Approach

2

Plan Stakeholder Engagement

2

Plan Business Analysis Governance

2

Plan Business Analysis Information Management

2

Identify Business Analysis Performance Improvements

2

Strategy Analysis

Analyze Current State

3

Define Future State

3

Assess Risks

3

Define Change Strategy

3

Elicitation and Collaboration

Prepare for Elicitation

5

Conduct Elicitation

5

Confirm Elicitation Results

5

Communicate Business Analysis Information

5

Manage Stakeholder Collaboration

5

Requirements Analysis and Design Definition

Specify and Model Requirements

6

Verify Requirements

6

Validate Requirements

6

Define Requirements Architecture

6

Define Design Options

6

Analyze Potential Value and Recommend Solution

6

Solution Evaluation

Measure Solution Performance

7

Analyze Performance Measures

7

Assess Solution Limitations

7

Assess Enterprise Limitations

7

Recommend Actions to Increase Solution Value

7

Requirements Life Cycle Management

Trace Requirements

4

Maintain Requirements

4

Prioritize Requirements

4

Assess Requirements Changes

4

Approve Requirements

4

Underlying Competencies

Analytical Thinking and Problem Solving

8

Behavioral Characteristics

8

Business Knowledge

8

Communication Skills

8

Interaction Skills

8

Tools and Technology

8

Perspectives

The Agile Perspective

9

The Business Intelligence Perspective

9

The Information Technology Perspective

9

The Business Architecture Perspective

9

The Business Process Management Perspective

9

The BABOK® Guide Version 3.0 is subject to change at any time without prior notice and at the IIBA™’s sole discretion. Please visit IIBA™’s website (www.theiiba.org) for the most current listing.

Assessment Test

Who determines what BABOK®Guide tasks are appropriate for their project?

Portfolio governance boardBusiness analysis teamProgram or project managerKey project stakeholders

Which statement about business analysis stakeholders is false?

They are likely to participate in business analysis tasks.They are a set of roles that must be filled for the project.They have a vested interest in the project and its outcome.They interact with the business analyst in specific ways.

What term is used to define an area undergoing analysis, including both an organization and its external stakeholders?

DomainSolutionRequirementScope

Which statement best describes the relationship between the lead business analyst (BA) and project manager (PM) when planning the resources and tasks for business analysis activities?

BA manages all stakeholders; PM manages project team.BA assigns all team roles; PM manages team work efforts.BA oversees project processes; PM manages overall project.BA manages business analysis work; PM manages overall project.

The business analysis plan is typically with and is a of the overall project plan.

Estimated, elementManaged, subprojectIntegrated, componentProduced, subset

What output is produced from conducting stakeholder analysis?

Stakeholder summary matrix and chartStakeholder roles and responsibilitiesStakeholder RACI matrix and onion diagramStakeholder list, map, or personas

What does the Business Analysis Core Concept Model (BACCM™) define?

Roles and characteristics of stakeholder groups and individualsConceptual framework for the business analysis professionLevels or types of requirements that will be defined for a projectKey terms and definitions used by the business analysis team

What describes the parts of the enterprise a change will impact?

Business analysis scopeChange scopeMethodologies, approaches, and techniquesUnderlying competencies

Which knowledge area’s activities are often performed as pre-project work?

Solution EvaluationStrategy AnalysisRequirements Analysis and Design DefinitionRequirements Life Cycle Management

Your organization has received a customer complaint about errors that the customer encountered when trying to place an order on the company website. As a result, a business need is evaluated. At which level of the enterprise was this business need identified?

Top-downExternal driversMiddle managementBottom-up

What describes an organization’s business processes, software, hardware, people, operations, and projects?

Business architectureStrategic architectureEnterprise architectureTechnical architecture

The business analysis team is defining new capabilities for a current software system along with the potential value expected from these changes. Which task are they performing?

Perform gap analysisAnalyze current stateDefine future stateDefine change strategy

Ginger has decided that making a new, innovative sales application available to the company’s sales force is a way to increase sales revenue in the future. Her company and their competitors have not used this technology in this way before. Which type of risk tolerance does this example illustrate?

Risk-averseRisk-seekingRisk-neutralRisk-ready

Which technique compares an organization’s strategies, operations, and processes against the “best-in-class” strategies, operations, and processes of their competitors and peers?

Decision analysisBenchmarkingFeasibility studyBrainstorming

What type of elicitation is taking place when a business analyst uses a software prototype to elicit and confirm user requirements regarding the usability of the interface?

ContextualCollaborativeExperimentResearch

Which technique is used when managing stakeholder collaboration to stimulate teamwork and collaboration?

SWOT analysisObservationPrototypesCollaborative games

You are preparing to elicit requirements from a group of key stakeholders. Which of the following high-level preparation activities will you not be performing?

Determine work products.Conduct a contextual inquiry.Decide the elicitation techniques.Establish elicitation logistics.

All of the following are inputs, guidelines, or tools used when confirming elicitation results except:

Elicitation results (confirmed)Elicitation activity planElicitation results (unconfirmed)Existing business analysis information

As part of your elicitation efforts, you are inspecting a person’s work environment for the tools and information assets they use to perform their daily work. Which type of observation are you performing?

Active observationContextual inquiryPassive observationTemporary apprentice

What output is produced when preparing for elicitation?

Business analysis informationStakeholder engagementElicitation results (confirmed)Elicitation activity plan

When does the requirements life cycle begin?

With development of a solutionWith representing a need as a requirementWith retiring all or part of a solutionWith approval of a business case

What traceability relationship is used when you are including a requirement that is necessary only if another requirement is implemented?

NecessityEffortSatisfyDerive

Which deliverable defines how requirements will be managed for reuse in an organization?

Business analysis approachGovernance approachRequirements architectureInformation management approach

What key input should be available to the business analyst when they are preparing to prioritize requirements?

DesignsRequirementsProposed changeSolution scope

What are the things you believe to be true on your project but that you have not actually verified?

CapabilitiesConstraintsAssumptionsLimitations

What types of requirements are typically developed using the tasks found in the Requirements Analysis and Design Definition knowledge area?

BusinessStakeholderSolutionAll of the above

Which of the following tasks is not part of the Requirements Analysis and Design Definition knowledge area?

Verify requirements.Allocate requirements.Define solution options.Validate requirements.

You have decided to prioritize your solution requirements based on a cost-benefit analysis of their relative value to the organization. What is your basis for prioritization?

Policy complianceBusiness riskTechnical riskBusiness value

You are describing the key objectives of modelling the project’s requirements to the project manager. The first objective is to understand what models are appropriate for the business domain and solution scope. What is the second objective?

Decompose business analysis information into components.Explicitly represent requirements and their attributes.Articulate requirements at the right level of abstraction.Define measurable evaluation criteria for each requirement.

Which task is an ongoing process to ensure that stakeholder, solution, and transition requirements align to the business requirements?

Allocate requirements.Validate requirements.Organize requirements.Verify requirements.

What is a key distinction between Solution Evaluation knowledge area tasks and similar tasks performed as part of Strategy Analysis or Requirements Analysis and Design Definition?

Iterative and incremental approach to doing workExistence of a working solution or solution componentInvolvement of the testing team and the business analystLevel of detail found in the actual work efforts

Which of the following items is not a stage of solution development?

Pilot releaseProof of conceptNetwork diagramOperational release

Which element is not one of the five elements used to analyze performance measures?

RisksTrendsComplexityAccuracy

Which technique assists you in understanding current business decisions as part of assessing solution limitations?

Functional decompositionBusiness rules analysisDecision analysisProcess modelling

Which tools and guidelines are used when recommending actions to increase solution value?

Business objectives, current state description, and solution scopeRisk analysis results, change strategy, and business objectivesBusiness objectives, future state description, and change strategyRisk analysis results, current state description, and solution scope