Globalization and Literature - Suman Gupta - ebook

Globalization and Literature ebook

Suman Gupta

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Opis

This book presents a state-of-the-art overview of the relationshipbetween globalization studies and literature and literary studies,and the bearing that they have on each other. It engages with themanner in which globalization is thematized in literary works,examines the relationship between globalization theory and literarytheory, and discusses the impact of globalization processes on theproduction and reception of literary texts. Suman Gupta argues that, while literature has registeredglobalization processes in relevant ways, there has been a missedarticulation between globalization studies and literary studies.Examples are given of some of the ways in which this slippage isnow being addressed and may be taken forward, taking up such themesas the manner in which anti-globalization protests and world citieshave figured in literary works; the ways in which theories ofpostmodernism and postcolonialism, familiar in literary studies,have diverged from and converged with globalization studies; andhow industries to do with the circulation of literature arebecoming globalized. This book is intended for university-level students andteachers, researchers, and other informed readers with an interestin the above issues, and serves as both a survey of the field andan intervention within it.

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Liczba stron: 440




Table of Contents

Cover

Themes in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature and Culture

Title page

Copyright page

Dedication

Acknowledgements

1 The Nuances of Globalization

NARRATIVE PERFORMANCE

TRAVELS OF A TERM

PLAN OF THIS STUDY

2 Movements and Protests

PLUCKING A THEME

ANTI-GLOBALIZATION PROTESTS

PEACE MOVEMENTS

V-DAY

3 Global Cities and Cosmopolis

GLOBAL TEENS

GLOBAL CITIES

GLOBAL CITY TRANSACTIONS

COSMOPOLITAN ORDER AND COSMOPOLIS

VIRTUAL COSMOPOLIS

4 Literary Studies and Globalization

LITERARY ENTANGLEMENTS

TURNING TO LITERARY STUDIES

GLOBALIZATION THEMATIZED

LITERARY TEXT

CULTURE AND IDENTITY

5 Postmodernism and Postcolonialism

POSTMODERNISM

POSTCOLONIALISM

6 Academic Institutional Spaces

ENGLISH STUDIES

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE/WORLD LITERATURE

A NOTE ON TRANSLATION

7 The Globalization of Literature

DYING AUTHORS

LITERARY INDUSTRIES

References

Index

Themes in Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature and Culture

Series Adviser: Rod Mengham

Modernism, Tim Armstrong

Globalization and Literature, Suman Gupta

The Postcolonial Novel, Richard Lane

Copyright © Suman Gupta 2009

The right of Suman Gupta to be identified as Author of this Work has been asserted in accordance with the UK Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

First published in 2009 by Polity Press

Polity Press

65 Bridge Street

Cambridge CB2 1UR, UK

Polity Press

350 Main Street

Malden, MA 02148, USA

All rights reserved. Except for the quotation of short passages for the purpose of criticism and review, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.

ISBN-13: 978-0-7456-4023-5

ISBN-13: 978-0-7456-4024-2 (pb)

ISBN-13: 978-0-7456-5820-9 (Single-user ebook)

ISBN-13: 978-0-7456-5819-3 (Multi-user ebook)

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

The publisher has used its best endeavours to ensure that the URLs for external websites referred to in this book are correct and active at the time of going to press. However, the publisher has no responsibility for the websites and can make no guarantee that a site will remain live or that the content is or will remain appropriate.

Every effort has been made to trace all copyright holders, but if any have been inadvertently overlooked the publisher will be pleased to include any necessary credits in any subsequent reprint or edition.

For further information on Polity, visit our website: www.polity.co.uk

To Ayan-Yue

Don’t kid yourself,

The Child is not father of the Man,

But he may already be il miglior fabbro,

And that’s worrying enough for this dad.

Acknowledgements

I have run various arguments and ideas that figure in this study past friends, and have benefited immensely from their responses. I am particularly grateful to the following for clearing up some of my confusions: Tapan Basu, Taieb Belghazi, Milena Katsarska, Tope Omoniyi, Bob Owens, Zhao Baisheng and, as ever, Xiao Cheng. Andrea Drugan had suggested the theme of this book to me and encouraged me to pursue it; I am grateful for this and will remain so even if she regrets it all later. Thanks are due to my colleagues in the English Department of the Open University for bearing with me while this was being written; and to Roehampton University for continuing to give me access to space and resources. No one but I am responsible for the shortcomings and errors in the following pages.

Suman Gupta

July 2008

1

The Nuances of Globalization

NARRATIVE PERFORMANCE

American novelist Richard Powers’s Plowing the Dark (2000) revolves around an early (1980s) prototype of a virtual reality chamber, the ‘Cavern’. Our familiarity with global electronic networks and virtual environments, which characterizes the new millennium at the portal of which this novel appeared, is prefigured in the ‘Cavern’. Protagonists from different disciplines are invited to use this nascent space to realize their visions and advance their understanding of the world. The main protagonist, artist Adie Klarpol, struggles to find an effective aesthetic output from the ‘Cavern’ and doesn’t achieve much beyond creating a 3-D version of Henri Rousseau’s Jungle paintings. Others (mathematicians, meteorologists, etc.) are more successful in advancing their fields. Economist Ronan O’Reilly, like Klarpol, also reaches towards failure in his engagement with the ‘Cavern’, but, unlike Klarpol’s, it is a grand world-encompassing failure. O’Reilly’s ambition is to use the ‘Cavern’ to create a model of the whole globe, and thereby to compute economic futures by taking into account not just a mass of existing economic data but also all kinds of social and political histories and scenarios. His model works – or ultimately doesn’t – as a visualizable virtual environment: in the ‘Cavern’ a virtual globe containing all the information within easy access is thrown up. O’Reilly can simply step into the globe and see the whole physical-social-economic world from the inside, as it were, and call up and compute with all the data he needs from anywhere in the world. O’Reilly’s achievement is first described in Powers’s economical yet vivid style as follows:

O’Reilly assigned the wand’s thumbwheel to a zoom function. A little scrolling and the Earth swelled to a medicine ball or imploded into an atom. With the rub of a thumb, Afghanistan, as it had lately in the world’s imagination, ballooned from an invisible speck to a billboard that filled the field of view.

When the globe grew large enough, O’Reilly simply stepped inside. The Cavern knew where his head was at all times, and rehung its coordinates accordingly. The crust of countries that the projectors served up looked even better from the underside than from the out. Inside, from the vantage of the earth’s core, O’Reilly could inspect the whole theatre at one glance, with no hidden hemisphere on the far side of a projection. The unbroken surface spread out above him in all directions, like the constellations of the night sky.

He set the wand’s buttons to throw various layers over his planetarium display. The slices of tonal register tracked the range of a variable as it wrestled its way through the proving grounds. Armed with canned data, O’Reilly took the globe out for a test spin. Per capita GDP, in single-year frames. As a function of energy consumption. As a function of consumer spending. All the classical formulae, for which he had only clinical patience, ran as ten-second, color-stabbing short subjects before Our Feature Attraction.

To this clean, coherent display, Ronan fused his ten-dimensional recursive cellular automata. All the furious systems, the flex and tensions of abductors and carpals clasped together in an invisible hand to rock a cradle now eminently observable. On the surface, sunsets and dawns illuminated the familiar jigsaw of the world’s nations. Underneath, a seething snake’s nest of cooperation and competition rippled through the global markets, deciding them. (Powers 2000, 119)

O’Reilly’s extraordinarily ambitious programme fails, it later emerges, because it doesn’t do what it’s designed to do: predict economic futures with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!