The Complete Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln - Abraham Lincoln - ebook
Opis

This edition includes an extensive and hard to find Lincoln biography by Professor John Frost, L.L.D. It contains the seven original volume with Lincoln's works from 1832 through 1865. "I have endured," wrote Lincoln not long before his death, "a great deal of ridicule without much malice, and have received a great deal of kindness not quite free from ridicule." On Easter Day, 1865, the world knew how little this ridicule, how much this kindness, had really signified. Thereafter, Lincoln the man became Lincoln the hero, year by year more heroic, until to-day, with the swift passing of those who knew him, his figure grows ever dimmer, less real. This should not be. For Lincoln the man, patient, wise, set in a high resolve, is worth far more than Lincoln the hero, vaguely glorious. Invaluable is the example of the man, intangible that of the hero. And, though it is not for us, as for those who in awed stillness listened at Gettysburg with inspired perception, to know Abraham Lincoln, yet there is for us another way whereby we may attain such knowledge-through his words-uttered in all sincerity to those who loved or hated him. Cold, unsatisfying they may seem, these printed words, while we can yet speak with those who knew him, and look into eyes that once looked into his. But in truth it is here that we find his simple greatness, his great simplicity, and though no man tried less so to show his power, no man has so shown it more clearly.

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The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln

Complete Constitutional Edition

Edited by Arthur Brooks Lapsley With an Introduction by Theodore Roosevelt The Essay on Lincoln by Carl Schurz The Address on Lincoln by Joseph Choate

Contents:

ABRAHAM LINCOLN – A CONCISE BIOGRAPHY

INTRODUCTORY

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

ABRAHAM LINCOLN: AN ESSAY BY CARL SHURZ

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, BY JOSEPH H. CHOATE

THE WRITINGS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

1832

ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF SANGAMON COUNTY.

1833

TO E. C. BLANKENSHIP.

RESPONSE TO REQUEST FOR POSTAGE RECEIPT

1836

ANNOUNCEMENT OF POLITICAL VIEWS.

RESPONSE TO POLITICAL SMEAR

TO MISS MARY OWENS.

1837

SPEECH IN ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

OPPOSITION TO MOB-RULE

PROTEST IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE ON THE SUBJECT OF SLAVERY.

TO MISS MARY OWENS.

TO JOHN BENNETT.

TO MARY OWENS.

LEGAL SUIT OF WIDOW v.s. Gen. ADAMS

LINCOLN AND TALBOTT IN REPLY TO GEN. ADAMS.

Gen. ADAMS CONTROVERSY—CONTINUED

1838

TO Mrs. O. H. BROWNING—A FARCE

1839

REMARKS ON SALE OF PUBLIC LANDS

TO ——— ROW.

SPEECH ON NATIONAL BANK

TO JOHN T. STUART.

1840

CIRCULAR FROM WHIG COMMITTEE.

TO JOHN T. STUART.

RESOLUTION IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

RESOLUTION IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

REMARKS IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

REMARKS IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

1841

TO JOHN T. STUART—ON DEPRESSION

REMARKS IN THE ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE.

CIRCULAR FROM WHIG COMMITTEE.

AGAINST THE REORGANIZATION OF THE JUDICIARY.

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED—MURDER CASE

STATEMENT ABOUT HARRY WILTON.

TO MISS MARY SPEED—PRACTICAL SLAVERY

1842

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED—ON MARRIAGE

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED.

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED—ON DEPRESSION

TO G. B. SHELEDY.

TO GEORGE E. PICKETT—ADVICE TO YOUTH

ADDRESS BEFORE THE SPRINGFIELD WASHINGTONIAN TEMPERANCE SOCIETY,

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED.

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED—ON MARRIAGE CONCERNS

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED.

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED.

A LETTER FROM THE LOST TOWNSHIPS

LOST TOWNSHIPS

INVITATION TO HENRY CLAY.

CORRESPONDENCE ABOUT THE LINCOLN-SHIELDS DUEL.

TO J. SHIELDS.

TO A. LINCOLN FROM JAS. SHIELDS

MEMORANDUM OF INSTRUCTIONS TO E. H. MERRYMAN,

TO JOSHUA F. SPEED.

TO JAMES S. IRWIN.

1843

RESOLUTIONS AT A WHIG MEETING AT SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS, MARCH 1, 1843.

CIRCULAR FROM WHIG COMMITTEE.

TO JOHN BENNETT.

JOSHUA F. SPEED.

TO MARTIN M. MORRIS.

TO MARTIN M. MORRIS.

TO GEN. J. J. HARDIN.

FIRST CHILD

1844

TO Gen. J. J. HARDIN.

1845

SELECTION OF CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATES

TO ——— WILLIAMS,

ABOLITION MOVEMENT

1846

REQUEST FOR POLITICAL SUPPORT

TO JOHN BENNETT.

TO N. J. ROCKWELL.

TO JAMES BERDAN.

TO JAMES BERDAN.

VERSES WRITTEN BY LINCOLN AFTER A VISIT TO HIS OLD HOME IN INDIANA

SECOND CHILD

TO MORRIS AND BROWN

TO WILLIAM H. HERNDON

TO WILLIAM H. HERNDON.

RESOLUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

REMARKS IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

1848

DESIRE FOR SECOND TERM IN CONGRESS

SPEECH ON DECLARATION OF WAR ON MEXICO

REPORT IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, JANUARY 19, 1848.

TO WILLIAM H. HERNDON—LEGAL WORK

REGARDING SPEECH ON MEXICAN WAR

TO WILLIAM H. HERNDON.

ON THE MEXICAN WAR

REPORT IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

REPORT IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

REMARKS IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, MARCH 29, 1848.

TO ARCHIBALD WILLIAMS.

REMARKS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

ON TAYLOR'S NOMINATION

DEFENSE OF MEXICAN WAR POSITION

ON ZACHARY TAYLOR NOMINATION

SPEECH IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG POLITICIANS

SALARY OF JUDGE IN WESTERN VIRGINIA

NATIONAL BANK

YOUNG v.s. OLD—POLITICAL JEALOUSY

GENERAL TAYLOR AND THE VETO

SPEECH DELIVERED AT WORCESTER, MASS., ON SEPT. 12, 1848.

HIS FATHER'S REQUEST FOR MONEY

1849

BILL GRANTING LANDS TO THE STATES TO MAKE RAILWAYS AND CANALS

ON FEDERAL POLITICAL APPOINTMENTS

MORE POLITICAL PATRONAGE REQUESTS

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

TO THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL.

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

TO THOMPSON.

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

TO J. GILLESPIE.

REQUEST FOR GENERAL LAND-OFFICE APPPOINTMENT

REQUEST FOR A PATENT

TO THE SECRETARY OF INTERIOR.

TO W. H. HERNDON.

TO J. GILLESPIE.

RESOLUTIONS OF SYMPATHY WITH THE CAUSE OF HUNGARIAN FREEDOM,

TO Dr. WILLIAM FITHIAN.

SPRINGFIELD, Dec. 15, 1849.

1850

RESOLUTIONS ON THE DEATH OF JUDGE NATHANIEL POPE.

NOTES FOR LAW LECTURE

1851

LETTERS TO FAMILY MEMBERS

TO JOHN D. JOHNSTON.

TO C. HOYT.

TO JOHN D. JOHNSTON.

PETITION ON BEHALF OF ONE JOSHUA GIPSON

TO J. D. JOHNSTON.

TO J. D. JOHNSTON.

Nov. 4, 1851

TO JOHN D. JOHNSTON.

TO JOHN D. JOHNSTON.

1852

EULOGY ON HENRY CLAY,

CHALLENGED VOTERS

1853

LEGAL OFFICE WORK

TO JOSHUA R. STANFORD.

1854

NEBRASKA MEASURE

TO A. B. MOREAU.

REPLY TO SENATOR DOUGLAS—PEORIA SPEECH

REQUEST FOR SENATE SUPPORT

TO T. J. HENDERSON.

TO J. GILLESPIE.

POLITICAL REFERENCES

TO T. J. HENDERSON.

1855

LOSS OF PRIMARY FOR SENATOR

RETURN TO LAW PROFESSION

TO O. H. BROWNING.

TO H. C. WHITNEY.

RESPONSE TO A PRO-SLAVERY FRIEND

1856

REQUEST FOR A RAILWAY PASS

SPEECH DELIVERED BEFORE THE FIRST REPUBLICAN STATE CONVENTION

POLITICAL CORRESPONDENCE

ON OUT-OF-STATE CAMPAIGNERS

REPUBLICAN CAMPAIGN SPEECH

ON THE DANGER OF THIRD-PARTIES

TO JESSE K. DUBOIS.

TO HARRISON MALTBY.

TO Dr. R. BOAL.

TO HENRY O'CONNER, MUSCATINE, IOWA.

AFTER THE DEMOCRATIC VICTORY OF BUCHANAN

TO Dr. R. BOAL.

1857

RESPONSE TO A DOUGLAS SPEECH

TO WILLIAM GRIMES.

ARGUMENT IN THE ROCK ISLAND BRIDGE CASE.

TO JESSE K. DUBOIS.

TO JOSEPH GILLESPIE.

TO J. GILLESPIE.

TO H. C. WHITNEY.

1858

ANOTHER POLITICAL PATRONAGE REFERENCE

POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

BRIEF AUTOBIOGRAPHY,

THE LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES I

SPEECH AT CHICAGO, JULY 10, 1858.

SPEECH AT SPRINGFIELD, JULY 17, 1858.

CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN LINCOLN AND DOUGLAS

MR. LINCOLN TO MR. DOUGLAS.

Mr. DOUGLAS TO Mr. LINCOLN.

Mr. LINCOLN TO Mr. DOUGLAS.

FIRST JOINT DEBATE, AT OTTAWA,

SECOND JOINT DEBATE, AT FREEPORT,

Mr. LINCOLN'S REJOINDER.

THIRD JOINT DEBATE, AT JONESBORO,

INTERROGATORIES:

CAMPBELL'S REPLY.

THE LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATES II

LINCOLN AND DOUGLAS FOURTH DEBATE, AT CHARLESTON, SEPTEMBER 18, 1858.

Mr. LINCOLN'S REJOINDER.

FIFTH JOINT DEBATE, AT GALESBURGH, OCTOBER 7, 1858

SIXTH JOINT DEBATE, AT QUINCY, OCTOBER 13, 1858.

Mr. LINCOLN'S REJOINDER.

LAST DEBATE, AT ALTON, OCTOBER 15, 1858

Mr. LINCOLN'S REPLY

1858

TO SYDNEY SPRING, GRAYVILLE, ILL.

TO H. C. WHITNEY.

TO J. W. SOMERS.

TO A. CAMPBELL.

TO J. GILLESPIE.

TO JOHN MATHERS, JACKSONVILLE, ILL.

TO JOSEPH GILLESPIE.

TO B. C. COOK.

TO HON. J. M. PALMER.

TO ALEXANDER SYMPSON.

TO J. O. CUNNINGHAM.

ON SLAVERY IN A DEMOCRACY.

TO B. C. COOK.

TO DR. WILLIAM FITHIAN, DANVILLE, ILL.

FRAGMENT OF SPEECH AT PARIS, ILL.,

SPEECH AT CLINTON, ILLINOIS,

FRAGMENT OF SPEECH AT EDWARDSVILLE, ILL.,

VERSE TO "LINNIE"

NEGROES ARE MEN

TO A. SYMPSON.

SENATORIAL ELECTION LOST AND OUT OF MONEY

THE FIGHT MUST GO ON

REALIZATION THAT DEBATES MUST BE SAVED

TO H. C. WHITNEY.

TO H. D. SHARPE.

TO A. SYMPSON.

ON BANKRUPTCY

NOTES OF AN ARGUMENT.

Section Ten of our Constitution requires that it should be general,

A LEGAL OPINION BY ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

TO M. W. DELAHAY.

TO W. M. MORRIS.

TO H. L. PIERCE AND OTHERS.

TO T. CANISIUS.

TO THE GOVERNOR, AUDITOR, AND TREASURER OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS.

ON LINCOLN'S SCRAP BOOK

1859

FIRST SUGGESTION OF A PRESIDENTIAL OFFER.

TO S. GALLOWAY.

IT IS BAD TO BE POOR.

SPEECH AT COLUMBUS, OHIO.

SPEECH AT CINCINNATI OHIO, SEPTEMBER 17, 1859

ON PROTECTIVE TARIFFS

ON MORTGAGES

FRAGMENT OF SPEECH AT LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS,

TO G. W. DOLE, G. S. HUBBARD, AND W. H. BROWN.

TO G. M. PARSONS AND OTHERS.

AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

ON NOMINATION TO THE NATIONAL TICKET

1860

SPEECH AT THE COOPER INSTITUTE, NEW YORK FEBRUARY 27, 1860

SPEECH AT NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, MARCH 6, 1860

RESPONSE TO AN ELECTOR'S REQUEST FOR MONEY

TO J. W. SOMERS.

ACCUSATION OF HAVING BEEN PAID FOR A POLITICAL SPEECH

TO H. TAYLOR.

TELEGRAM TO A MEMBER OF THE ILLINOIS DELEGATION

REPLY TO THE COMMITTEE SENT BY THE CHICAGO CONVENTION TO INFORM

ACCEPTANCE OF NOMINATION AS REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT

To C. B. SMITH.

FORM OF REPLY PREPARED BY MR. LINCOLN,

TO E. B. WASHBURNE.

TO S. HAYCRAFT.

ABRAHAM OR "ABRAM"

UNAUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY

TO HANNIBAL HAMLIN.

TO A. JONAS.

TO JOHN B. FRY.

TO THURLOW WEED

SLOW TO LISTEN TO CRIMINATIONS

TO HANNIBAL HAMLIN

TO E. B. WASHBURNE.

TO W. H. HERNDON.

TO L. M. BOND.

LETTER SUGGESTING A BEARD

EARLY INFORMATION ON ARMY DEFECTION IN SOUTH

TO HANNIBAL HAMLIN

TO SAMUEL HAYCRAFT.

TO ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS

TO HANNIBAL HAMLIN

BLOCKING "COMPROMISE" ON SLAVERY ISSUE

OPINION ON SECESSION

SOME FORTS SURRENDERED TO THE SOUTH

TO A. H. STEPHENS.

SUPPORT OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE CLAUSE

TO D. HUNTER.

TO I. N. MORRIS

ATTEMPT TO FORM A COALITION CABINET

1861

TO WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

TO W. H. SEWARD.

TO E. D. MORGAN

PATRONAGE CLAIMS

FAREWELL ADDRESS AT SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS,

REMARKS AT TOLONO, ILLINOIS, FEBRUARY 11, 1861

REPLY TO ADDRESS OF WELCOME, INDIANAPOLIS,

ADDRESS TO THE LEGISLATURE OF INDIANA, AT INDIANAPOLIS,

INTENTIONS TOWARD THE SOUTH

ADDRESS TO THE GERMAN CLUB OF CINCINNATI, OHIO,

ADDRESS TO THE LEGISLATURE OF OHIO AT COLUMBUS

ADDRESS AT STEUBENVILLE, OHIO,

ADDRESS AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

ADDRESS AT CLEVELAND, OHIO,

ADDRESS AT BUFFALO, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT ROCHESTER, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT SYRACUSE, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT UTICA, NEW YORK,

REPLY TO THE MAYOR OF ALBANY, NEW YORK

REPLY TO GOVERNOR MORGAN OF NEW YORK, AT ALBANY,

ADDRESS TO THE LEGISLATURE OF NEW YORK, AT ALBANY,

ADDRESS AT TROY, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT HUDSON, NEW YORK.

ADDRESS AT PEEKSKILL, NEW YORK,

ADDRESS AT FISHKILL LANDING

REMARKS AT THE ASTOR HOUSE, NEW YORK CITY, FEBRUARY 19, 1861

ADDRESS AT NEW YORK CITY,

REPLY TO THE MAYOR OF NEW YORK CITY,

ADDRESS AT JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY

REPLY TO THE MAYOR OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY,

ADDRESS IN TRENTON AT THE TRENTON HOUSE,

ADDRESS TO THE SENATE OF NEW JERSEY

ADDRESS TO THE ASSEMBLY OF NEW JERSEY,

REPLY TO THE MAYOR OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA,

ADDRESS IN THE HALL OF INDEPENDENCE, PHILADELPHIA,

REPLY TO THE WILMINGTON DELEGATION,

ADDRESS AT LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA,

ADDRESS TO THE LEGISLATURE OF PENNSYLVANIA, AT HARRISBURG,

REPLY TO THE MAYOR OF WASHINGTON, D.C.,

REPLY TO A SERENADE AT WASHINGTON, D.C.,

WASHINGTON, SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 1861

FIRST INAUGURAL ADDRESS, MARCH 4, 1861

REFUSAL OF SEWARD RESIGNATION

REPLY TO THE PENNSYLVANIA DELEGATION,

REPLY TO THE MASSACHUSETTS DELEGATION,

TO SECRETARY SEWARD

REPLY TO THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS

TO SECRETARY SEWARD

TO J. COLLAMER

TO THE POSTMASTER-GENERAL.

NOTE ASKING CABINET OPINIONS ON FORT SUMTER.

ON ROYAL ARBITRATION OF AMERICAN BOUNDARY LINE

AMBASSADORIAL APPOINTMENTS

TO G. E. PATTEN.

RESPONSE TO SENATE INQUIRY RE. FORT SUMTER

PREPARATION OF FIRST NAVAL ACTION

TO ——— STUART.

TO THE COMMANDANT OF THE NEW YORK NAVY-YARD.

TO LIEUTENANT D. D. PORTER

RELIEF EXPEDITION FOR FORT SUMTER

ORDER TO CAPTAIN SAMUEL MERCER.

SECRETARY SEWARD'S BID FOR POWER

REPLY TO SECRETARY SEWARD'S MEMORANDUM

REPLY TO A COMMITTEE FROM THE VIRGINIA CONVENTION, APRIL 13, 1861

PROCLAMATION CALLING FOR 75,000 MILITIA,

PROCLAMATION OF BLOCKADE, APRIL 19, 1861

TO GOVERNOR HICKS AND MAYOR BROWN.

TO GOVERNOR HICKS.

ORDER TO DEFEND FROM A MARYLAND INSURRECTION

PROCLAMATION OF BLOCKADE, APRIL 27, 1861

REMARKS TO A MILITARY COMPANY, WASHINGTON, APRIL 27, 1861

LOCALIZED REPEAL OF WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS

MILITARY ENROLLMENT OF ST. LOUIS CITIZENS

CONDOLENCE OVER FAILURE OF FT. SUMTER RELIEF

PROCLAMATION CALLING FOR 42,034 VOLUNTEERS,

COMMUNICATION WITH VICE-PRESIDENT

ORDER TO COLONEL ANDERSON,

PROCLAMATION SUSPENDING THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS IN FLORIDA,

TO SECRETARY WELLES.

PRESIDENT LINCOLN'S CORRECTIONS OF A DIPLOMATIC DESPATCH

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR,

TO GOVERNOR MORGAN.

TO CAPTAIN DAHLGREEN.

LETTER OF CONDOLENCE TO ONE OF FIRST CASUALTIES

TO COLONEL BARTLETT.

MEMORANDUM ABOUT INDIANA REGIMENTS.

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

TO THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

TO N. W. EDWARDS

TO SECRETARY CAMERON.

HON. SECRETARY OF WAR.

TO THE KENTUCKY DELEGATION.

August 5, 1861.

ORDER AUTHORIZING GENERAL SCOTT TO SUSPEND THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS, JULY

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS IN SPECIAL SESSION,

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TO THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL

MEMORANDA OF MILITARY POLICY SUGGESTED BY THE BULL RUN DEFEAT. JULY 23,

TO THE GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

TO SECRETARY CHASE.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

ORDER TO UNITED STATES MARSHALS.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

TO SECRETARY CAMERON.

PROCLAMATION OF A NATIONAL FAST-DAY, AUGUST 12, 1861.

TO JAMES POLLOCK.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR O. P. MORTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FREMONT,

PROCLAMATION FORBIDDING INTERCOURSE WITH REBEL STATES, AUGUST 16, 1861.

TO SECRETARY CAMERON.

TO GOVERNOR MAGOFFIN,

TO GENERAL FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNORS

TO GENERAL FREMONT.

TO MRS. FREMONT.

TO JOSEPH HOLT,

TO GENERAL SCOTT

TO SECRETARY CAMERON.

TO GENERAL FREMONT,

To O. H. BROWNING.

MEMORANDUM FOR A PLAN OF CAMPAIGN

TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

TO THE VICEROY OF EGYPT.

ORDER AUTHORIZING SUSPENSION OF THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS.

TO SECRETARY OF INTERIOR.

TWO SONS WHO WANT TO WORK

TO GENERAL THOMAS W. SHERMAN.

TO GENERAL CURTIS, WITH INCLOSURES.

WASHINGTON, October 24, 1861

WASHINGTON, October 24, 1861

ORDER RETIRING GENERAL SCOTT AND APPOINTING

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON.

ORDER APPROVING THE PLAN OF GOVERNOR GAMBLE OF MISSOURI.

REPLY TO THE MINISTER FROM SWEDEN.

INDORSEMENT AUTHORIZING MARTIAL LAW IN SAINT LOUIS.

OFFER TO COOPERATE AND GIVE SPECIAL LINE OF INFORMATION TO HORACE GREELEY

ORDER AUTHORIZING GENERAL HALLECK TO SUSPEND THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS,

ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

LETTER OF REPRIMAND TO GENERAL HUNTER

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HALLECK.

1862

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. C. BUELL.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TO THE PEOPLE OF MARYLAND,

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

MESSAGES OF DISAPPOINTMENT WITH HIS GENERALS

TO GENERAL D. C. BUELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUELL.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

INDORSEMENT ON LETTER FROM GENERAL HALLECK,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR ANDREW.

TO GENERAL D. C. BUELL.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

PRESIDENT'S GENERAL WAR ORDER NO. 1

TO SECRETARY STANTON,

PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL WAR ORDER NO. 1.

OPPOSITION TO McCLELLAN'S PLANS

Memorandum accompanying Letter of President Lincoln to General McClellan,

TO WM. H. HERNDON.

RESPITE FOR NATHANIEL GORDON

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

TO GENERALS D. HUNTER AND J. H. LANE.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 1, RELATING TO POLITICAL PRISONERS.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS. WASHINGTON CITY, February 15, 1862

FIRST WRITTEN NOTICE OF GRANT

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 2.—IN RELATION TO STATE PRISONERS.

ORDER RELATING TO COMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE.

SPEECH TO THE PERUVIAN MINISTER,

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS RECOMMENDING COMPENSATED EMANCIPATION.

INDORSEMENT ON LETTER FROM GOVERNOR YATES.

PRESIDENT'S GENERAL WAR ORDER NO.2.

PRESIDENT'S GENERAL WAR ORDER NO.3.

INTERVIEW BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT AND SOME BORDER SLAVE STATE

PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL WAR ORDER NO.3.

FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL MCCLELLAN.

SPEECH TO A PARTY OF MASSACHUSETTS GENTLEMAN

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

GIFT OF SOME RABBITS

INSTRUCTION TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

PROCLAMATION RECOMMENDING THANKSGIVING FOR VICTORIES,

ABOLISHING SLAVERY IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO POSTMASTER-GENERAL

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE, MAY 1, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

RESPONSE TO EVANGELICAL LUTHERANS, MAY 6, 1862

TELEGRAM TO FLAG-OFFICER L. M. GOLDSBOROUGH.

FURTHER REPRIMAND OF McCLELLAN

TO FLAG-OFFICER L. M. GOLDSBOROUGH,

PROCLAMATION RAISING THE BLOCKADE OF CERTAIN PORTS.

1862

RECOMMENDATION OF NAVAL OFFICERS

TO THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

SPEECH TO THE 12TH INDIANA REGIMENT, MAY [15?] 1862

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

MEMORANDUM OF PROPOSED ADDITIONS TO INSTRUCTIONS OF ABOVE DATE

MILITARY EMANCIPATION

FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

PROCLAMATION REVOKING GENERAL HUNTER'S ORDER OF MILITARY EMANCIPATION,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. E. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL RUFUS SAXTON.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL D. S. MILES.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. W. GEARY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

ORDER TAKING MILITARY POSSESSION OF RAILROADS.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY CHASE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. SAXTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. SAXTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. SAXTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

HISTORY OF CONSPIRACY OF REBELLION

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GOVERNOR ANDREW.

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MARCY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FREMONT

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MARCY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL I. McDOWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT. WASHINGTON, June 12, 1862.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TO GENERAL J. C. FREMONT.

TO GENERAL C. SCHURZ.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TREATY WITH MEXICO

VETO OF A CURRENCY BILL

SPEECH AT JERSEY CITY, JUNE 24, 1862.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

ORDER CONSTITUTING THE ARMY OF VIRGINIA.

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAMS TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

WAR DEPARTMENT, June, 28, 1862

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

TELEGRAM TO FLAG-OFFICER L. M. GOLDSBOROUGH.

To GOVERNOR MORTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY SEWARD. WAR DEPARTMENT, June 30, 1862.

CALL FOR TROOPS. NEW YORK, June 30, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

TELEGRAMS TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

WASHINGTON, D.C., June 30, 1862.

CALL FOR 300,000 VOLUNTEERS, JULY 1, 1862.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, July 1, 1862

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING TAXES IN REBELLIOUS STATES, JULY 1, 1862.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, JULY 1, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

CIRCULAR LETTER TO THE GOVERNORS.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

MEMORANDUM OF AN INTERVIEW BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL McCLELLAN

ORDER MAKING HALLECK GENERAL-IN-CHIEF.

ORDER CONCERNING THE SOUTHWEST BRANCH OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON. WAR DEPARTMENT, July 11, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK. WAR DEPARTMENT, July 11, 1862.

APPEAL TO BORDER-STATES IN FAVOR OF COMPENSATED EMANCIPATION.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

ACT OF COMPENSATED EMANCIPATION

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO SOLOMON FOOT.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS. July 17, 1862.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS. July 17, 1862.

FELLOW-CITIZENS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

ORDER IN REGARD TO BEHAVIOR OF ALIENS

ORDER AUTHORIZING EMPLOYMENT OF "CONTRABANDS."

WARNING TO REBEL SYMPATHIZERS

HOLD MY HAND WHILST THE ENEMY STABS ME

TO CUTHBERT BULLITT.

TO LOYAL GOVERNORS.

BROKEN EGGS CANNOT BE MENDED

TO COUNT GASPARIN.

SPEECH AT A WAR MEETING, WASHINGTON, AUGUST 6, 1862

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR ANDREW. August 12, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN. August 12, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. R. CURTIS. August 12, 1862.

ADDRESS ON COLONIZATION TO A DEPUTATION OF COLORED MEN.

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER AT CAMP CHASE, OHIO.

TO HIRAM BARNEY.

NOTE OF INTRODUCTION.

TO Mrs. PRESTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE OR GENERAL PARKE.

TO G. P. WATSON.

TO HORACE GREELEY.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR YATES.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR RAMSEY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL HAUPT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL HAUPT.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL HAUPT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BANKS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

ORDER TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. G. WRIGHT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. E. WOOL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B, McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. C. BUELL.

TELEGRAM TO T. WEBSTER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO GOVERNOR CURTIN. September 11, 1862.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL C. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. G. WRIGHT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO A. HENRY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

REPLY TO REQUEST THE PRESIDENT ISSUE A PROCLAMATION OF EMANCIPATION.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. G. WRIGHT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO J. K. DUBOIS. WASHINGTON, D.C.,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR MORTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL KETCHUM.

PRELIMINARY EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, SEPTEMBER 22, 1862.

PROCLAMATION SUSPENDING THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS,

REPLY TO SERENADE, SEPTEMBER 24, 1862.

RECORD EXPLAINING THE DISMISSAL OF MAJOR JOHN J. KEY

TO HANNIBAL HAMLIN.

TO GENERAL HALLECK.

REMARKS TO THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC AT FREDERICK, MARYLAND,

TELEGRAM FROM GENERAL HALLECK

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCLELLAN.

TO T. H. CLAY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. T. BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR PIERPOINT.

EXECUTIVE ORDER ESTABLISHING A PROVISIONAL COURT IN LOUISIANA.

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL JAMESON.

GENERAL McCLELLAN'S TIRED HORSES

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

MEMORANDUM.

ORDER RELIEVING GENERAL G. B. McCLELLAN

TELEGRAM TO M. F. ODELL.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL LOWE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. POPE.

TO COMMODORE FARRAGUT.

ORDER CONCERNING BLOCKADE.

ORDER CONCERNING THE CONFISCATION ACT.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

GENERAL ORDER RESPECTING THE OBSERVANCE OF THE SABBATH DAY

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BLAIR

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

TO GOVERNOR SHEPLEY.

ORDER PROHIBITING THE EXPORT OF ARMS AND MUNITIONS OF WAR.

DELAYING TACTICS OF GENERALS

TO CARL SCHURZ.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TO ATTORNEY-GENERAL BATES.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

ON EXECUTING 300 INDIANS

ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, DECEMBER 1, 1862.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TELEGRAM TO H. J. RAYMOND.

TELEGRAM TO B. G. BROWN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS. December 8, 1862.

TO GENERAL S. R. CURTIS.

TO J. K. DUBOIS.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TO FERNANDO WOOD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL H. H. SIBLEY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR GAMBLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TO SECRETARIES SEWARD AND CHASE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR ANDREW.

TO T. J. HENDERSON.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC

LETTER OF CONDOLENCE

TO SECRETARY OF WAR.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR GAMBLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO H. J. RAYMOND.

1863

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION, JANUARY 1, 1863.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS

TO GENERAL S. R. CURTIS.

TO SECRETARY WELLES.

TO GENERAL S. L CURTIS.

TO CALEB RUSSELL AND SALLIE A. FENTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO B. G. BROWN.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE, JANUARY 8, 1863.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, WASHINGTON, January 7, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. R. CURTIS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

INSTRUCTION TO THE JUDGE-ADVOCATE-GENERAL.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. JANUARY 14, 1863.

TO SECRETARY OF WAR.

PRINTING MONEY

TO THE WORKING-MEN OF MANCHESTER, ENGLAND.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

FITZ-JOHN PORTER COURT-MARTIAL.

FROM GENERAL HALLECK TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

ORDER RELIEVING GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE AND MAKING OTHER CHANGES.

TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TO THURLOW WEED.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK.

TO THE WORKING-MEN OF LONDON, ENGLAND.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK. [Cipher.] WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C.,

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO SIMON CAMERON.

TO ALEXANDER REED.

TELEGRAM TO J. K. DUBOIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER

PROCLAMATION CONVENING THE SENATE, FEBRUARY 28, 1863

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR TOD,

PROCLAMATION RECALLING SOLDIERS TO THEIR REGIMENTS, MARCH 10, 1863

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO J. O. MORTON.

GRANT'S EXCLUSION OF A NEWSPAPER REPORTER

TO BENJAMIN GRATZ.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. A. HURLBUT.

QUESTION OF RAISING NEGRO TROOPS

PROCLAMATION APPOINTING A NATIONAL FAST-DAY.

LICENSE OF COMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE.

TO GENERAL D. HUNTER.

PROCLAMATION ABOUT COMMERCIAL INTERCOURSE, APRIL 2, 1863

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

OPINION ON HARBOR DEFENSE.

TELEGRAM TO THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER IN COMMAND AT NASHVILLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO ADMIRAL S. P. DUPONT.

TO GENERAL D. HUNTER AND ADMIRAL S. F. DUPONT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. HOOKER.

ON COLONIZATION ARRANGEMENTS

STATEHOOD FOR WEST VIRGINIA, APRIL 20, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO W. A. NEWELL.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. BUTTERFIELD.

GENERALS LOST

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL R. INGALLS.

TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

DRAFTING OF ALIENS

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTTERFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR

TELEGRAM TO A. G. HENRY.

TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

FACTIONAL QUARRELS

TELEGRAM TO JAMES GUTHRIE.

TO SECRETARY OF WAR.

ORDERS SENDING C. L. VALLANDIGHAM BEYOND MILITARY LINES.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 20, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. A. HURLBUT.

TELEGRAM TO ANSON STAGER.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL HAGGARD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BUCKINGHAM.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TO ERASTUS CORNING.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TO J. K. DUBOIS AND OTHERS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL LUDLOW.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER. [Cipher.] EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTTERFIELD.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. GRIMSLEY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO J. P. HALE.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TO ERASTUS CORNING AND OTHERS.

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL TYLER.

RESPONSE TO A "BESIEGED" GENERAL

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL KELLEY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. C. SCHENCK.

NEEDS NEW TIRES ON HIS CARRIAGE

CALL FOR 100,000 MILITIA TO SERVE FOR SIX MONTHS, JUNE 15, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO P. KAPP AND OTHERS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEAGHER.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL BLISS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO JOSHUA TEVIS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR TOD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DINGMAN.

TO B. B. MALHIOT AND OTHERS.

TO GENERAL J. M. SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

TO SECRETARY OF WAR.

TELEGRAM TO MAJOR VAN VLIET.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL COUCH.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL PECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SLOCUM.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BOYLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK.

FURTHER DEMOCRATIC PARTY CRITICISM

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR PARKER.

TELEGRAM TO A. K. McCLURE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL COUCH. [Cipher] WASHINGTON CITY, June 30, 1863. 3.23

TO GENERAL D. HUNTER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

REASSURING SON IN COLLEGE

ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEWS FROM GETTYSBURG.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FRENCH. [Cipher] WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C.,

CONTINUED FAILURE TO PURSUE ENEMY

RESPONSE TO A SERENADE,

SURRENDER OF VICKSBURG TO GENERAL GRANT

TELEGRAM FROM GENERAL HALLECK TO GENERAL G. C. MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL THOMAS.

NEWS OF GRANT'S CAPTURE OF VICKSBURG

TELEGRAM TO F. F. LOWE.

TELEGRAM TO L. SWETT AND P. F. LOWE.

TELEGRAM TO J. K. DUBOIS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK.

TO GENERAL GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. M. SCHOFIELD.

SON IN COLLEGE DOES NOT WRITE HIS PARENTS

INTIMATION OF ARMISTICE PROPOSALS

PROCLAMATION FOR THANKSGIVING, JULY 15, 1863

TELEGRAM TO L. SWETT.

TELEGRAM TO SIMON CAMERON.

TELEGRAM TO J. O. BROADHEAD.

TO GENERAL LANE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR MORTON.

TO GOVERNOR PARKER

TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. M. SCHOFIELD

TO POSTMASTER-GENERAL BLAIR

TO SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

LETTER TO GOVERNOR PARKER.

To GENERAL G. G. MEADE. (Private.)

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. B. BURNSIDE.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

ORDER OF RETALIATION.

TO GENERAL S. A. HURLBUT.

TELEGRAM FROM GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

TO GENERAL J. A. McCLERNAND.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

To J. H. HACKETT.

TO F. F. LOWE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. GRIMSLEY.

TO CRITICS OF EMANCIPATION

TO JAMES CONKLING.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. M. SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. G. MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO F. C. SHERMAN AND J. S. HAYES.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL CRAWFORD.

TELEGRAM TO L. SWETT.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO J. C. CONKLING.

TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

POLITICAL MOTIVATED MISQUOTATION IN NEWSPAPER

ORDER CONCERNING COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.

TELEGRAM TO J. SEGAR.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO F. C. SHERMAN AND J. S. HAYES.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL WHEATON.

TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO H. H. SCOTT.

TELEGRAM TO J. G. BLAINE.

PROCLAMATION SUSPENDING WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS, SEPTEMBER 15, 1863.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. SPEED.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHENCK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

REQUEST TO SUGGEST NAME FOR A BABY

TELEGRAM TO MRS. ARMSTRONG.

TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

MILITARY STRATEGY

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO O. M. HATCH AND J. K. DUBOIS.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

PROCLAMATION OPENING THE PORT OF ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

MRS. LINCOLN'S REBEL BROTHER-IN-LAW KILLED

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL McCALLUM.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO F. S. CORKRAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL TYLER

TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. M. SCHOFIELD.

PROCLAMATION FOR THANKSGIVING, OCTOBER 3, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. M. SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TO C. D. DRAKE AND OTHERS.

THE CASE OF DR. DAVID M. WRIGHT

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. G. MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO WAYNE McVEIGH.

TO THURLOW WEED.

TO L. B. TODD.

AID TO MRS. HELM, MRS. LINCOLN'S SISTER

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO T. W. SWEENEY.

TELEGRAM TO T. C. DURANT.

COMMENT ON A NOTE.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

CALL FOR 300,000 VOLUNTEERS, OCTOBER 17, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

TELEGRAM TO W. B. THOMAS

TELEGRAM TO J. WILLIAMS AND N. G. TAYLOR.

TELEGRAM TO T. C. DURANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. C. SCHENCK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL R. C. SCHENCK.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TO E. B. WASHBURNE.

TO SECRETARY CHASE.

TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TO VICE-PRESIDENT HAMLIN.

TO J. W. GRIMES.

TELEGRAM TO P. F. LOWE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

MEMORANDUM.

TELEGRAM TO W. H. SEWARD.

TO POSTMASTER-GENERAL BLAIR.

TO GOVERNOR BRADFORD.

TO J. H. HACKETT

TELEGRAM TO W. H. SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, November 3, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL A. E. BURNSIDE. WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, November

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. G. MEADE.

ORDER CONCERNING THE EXPORT OF TOBACCO PURCHASED BY FOREIGN NATIONS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SCHOFIELD.

TELEGRAM TO HIRAM BARNEY.

TELEGRAM TO J. MILDERBORGER.

TELEGRAM to E. H. AND E. JAMESON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

TO SECRETARY CHASE

ADDRESS AT GETTYSBURG

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO E. P. EVANS.

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL GRANT.

TO C. P. KIRKLAND.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF UNION SUCCESS IN EAST TENNESSEE.

PROCLAMATION OF AMNESTY AND RECONSTRUCTION. DECEMBER 8, 1863.

ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, DECEMBER 8, 1863.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS. WASHINGTON D. C., December 8, 1863.

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE. WASHINGTON, D. C., December 8, 1863.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TO JUDGE HOFFMAN.

TELEGRAM TO MARY GONYEAG.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING DISCRIMINATING DUTIES, DECEMBER 16, 1863.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HURLBUT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TO O. D. FILLEY.

TELEGRAM TO MILITARY COMMANDER AT POINT LOOKOUT.

TELEGRAM TO MILITARY COMMANDER AT POINT LOOKOUT.

TELEGRAM TO U. F. LINDER.

TO GENERAL N. P. BANKS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

1864

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SULLIVAN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR PIERPOINT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BRAMLETTE.

TO GENERAL Q. A. GILLMORE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BROUGH. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, January 15,

TO CROSBY AND NICHOLS.

TO GENERAL P. STEELE.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, JANUARY 20, 1864

ORDER APPROVING TRADE REGULATIONS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL FOSTER.

TELEGRAM TO E. STANLEY.

TO GENERAL H. W. HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SICKLES.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BRAMLETTE.

COLONIZATION EXPERIMENT

ORDER FOR A DRAFT OF FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND MEN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR YATES.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR MURPHY.

THE STORY OF THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SEDGWICK.

TELEGRAM TO HORACE MAYNARD.

TO W. M. FISHBACK.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL STEELE.

TELEGRAM TO A. ROBINSON.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING BLOCKADE, FEBRUARY 18, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO COMMANDER BLAKE.

TELEGRAM FROM WARREN JORDAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ROSECRANS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL STEELE.

TO GENERAL F. STEELE.

DESERTERS DEATH SENTENCES REMITTED

FEMALE SPY

TO W. JAYNE.

TO E. H. EAST.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TO SECRETARY CHASE.

TO GENERAL THOMAS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL STEELE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

ORDER IN REGARD TO THE EXPORTATION OF TOBACCO BELONGING TO THE FRENCH

TELEGRAM TO UNITED STATES MARSHAL, LOUISVILLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

MESSAGE TO SENATE.

ADDRESS TO GENERAL GRANT,

ORDER ASSIGNING U. S. GRANT COMMAND OF THE ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR MURPHY.

TO GENERAL HAHN. (Private.)

CALL FOR TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND MEN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

PASS FOR GENERAL D. E. SICKLES.

ORDER TO GOVERNOR HAHN.

REMARKS AT A FAIR IN THE PATENT OFFICE,

REPLY TO A COMMITTEE FROM THE WORKINGMEN'S ASSOCIATION OF NEW YORK,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

CORRESPONDENCE WITH GENERAL C. SCHURZ.

PROCLAMATION ABOUT AMNESTY,

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TO GENERAL G. G. MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TO A. G. HODGES.

TO MRS. HORACE MANN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

LECTURE ON LIBERTY

TO CALVIN TRUESDALE.

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER COMMANDING AT FORT WARREN.

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER COMMANDING AT FORT WARREN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

INDORSEMENT ON OFFER OF TROOPS, APRIL 23, 1864.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO JOHN WILLIAMS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL THOMAS.

TO GOVERNOR MURPHY.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS, APRIL 28, 1864.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ROSECRANS.

TO MRS. S. B. McCONKEY.

RECOMMENDATION OF THANKSGIVING.

RESPONSE TO A SERENADE,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL LEW WALLACE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS,

TO P. B. LOOMIS.

RESPONSE TO A METHODIST DELEGATION, MAY 14, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR YATES. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, May 18, 1864.

ARREST AND IMPRISONMENT OF IRRESPONSIBLE NEWSPAPER REPORTERS AND EDITORS

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL B. P. BUTLER.

ORDER CONCERNING THE EXEMPTION OF AMERICAN CONSULS FROM MILITARY SERVICE

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR MORTON AND OTHERS. EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 21, 1864

TELEGRAM TO CHRISTIANA A. SACK. WAR DEPARTMENT WASHINGTON, D. C., May 21,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BROUGH. WASHINGTON CITY, May 24, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, May 25,1864.

MEMORANDUM CONCERNING THE TRANSPORTATION OF THE NEW YORK NAVAL BRIGADE.

TO P. A. CONKLING AND OTHERS.

INDORSEMENT ON A LETTER TOUCHING THE REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL MEADE. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, June 6, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS. WASHINGTON, June 8, 1864.

REPLY TO THE COMMITTEE NOTIFYING PRESIDENT LINCOLN OF HIS RENOMINATION,

PLATFORM OF THE UNION NATIONAL CONVENTION HELD IN BALTIMORE, MD., JUNE 7

REPLY TO A DELEGATION FROM THE NATIONAL UNION LEAGUE,

REPLY TO A DELEGATION FROM OHIO,

ADDRESS TO THE ENVOY FROM THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS,

REMARKS TO AN OHIO REGIMENT,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL L. THOMAS. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, June 13,

TELEGRAM TO THOMAS WEBSTER. WASHINGTON, D. C., June 13, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, June 15, 1864. 7 A.M.

ADDRESS AT A SANITARY FAIR IN PHILADELPHIA,

TO ATTORNEY-GENERAL BATES.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS. WASHINGTON, June 24, 1864.

LETTER ACCEPTING THE NOMINATION FOR PRESIDENT.

TO GENERAL P. STEELE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL GRANT. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, June 29, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO DAVID TOD.

TO J. L. SCRIPPS.

FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR.

PROCLAMATION SUSPENDING THE WRIT OF HABEAS CORPUS,

PROCLAMATION FOR A DAY OF PRAYER, JULY 7, 1864.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING A BILL "TO GUARANTEE TO CERTAIN STATES,

TO HORACE GREELEY.

TELEGRAM TO J. W. GARRETT. WASHINGTON, D. C., July 9, 1864

TELEGRAM FROM GENERAL HALLECK TO GENERAL WALLACE.

TELEGRAM TO T. SWAN AND OTHERS. WASHINGTON, D. C., July 10, 1864. 9.20

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. WASHINGTON CITY, July TO, 1864.2 P.M.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, July 11, 1864. 8 A.M.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., July 12, 1864. 11.30

TELEGRAM AND LETTER TO HORACE GREELEY. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, July

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, JULY 15, 1864.

SAFE CONDUCT FOR CLEMENT C. CLAY AND OTHERS,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. [WASHINGTON] July 17. 1864. 11.25 A.M.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. HUNTER WASHINGTON JULY 17, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN.

ANNOUNCEMENT CONCERNING TERMS OF PEACE.

PROCLAMATION CALLING FOR FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND VOLUNTEERS,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO J. L. WRIGHT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. HUNTER. (Cipher.)

TO GOVERNOR CURTIN, ENCLOSING A LETTER TO WILLIAM O. SNIDER.

PRESENTATION OF A CANE

FROM JOHN HAY TO J. C. WELLING.

TO COLONEL, FIRST N. Y. VETERAN CAVALRY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN.

FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL HALLECK.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON. WASHINGTON, July 27, 1864.

TO Mrs. ANNE WILLIAMSON,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U, S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO HORACE GREELEY.

TELEGRAM TO HORACE GREELEY.

ON DISLOYAL FAMILY MEMBER

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN.

INTERVIEW WITH JOHN T. MILLS,

ENDORSEMENT OF APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT, AUGUST 15, 1864.

TO H. J. RAYMOND.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS, AUGUST 18, 1864.

INDORSEMENT CONCERNING AN EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS, AUGUST 18, 1864.

ADDRESS TO THE 164TH OHIO REGIMENT,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D. C., August

ADDRESS TO THE 166TH OHIO REGIMENT,

MEMORANDUM.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, August 26,

TELEGRAM TO B. H. BREWSTER. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D. C., August

ORDER CONCERNING COTTON.

TO COLONEL HUIDEKOPER.

PROCLAMATION OF THANKSGIVING,

ORDERS OF GRATITUDE AND REJOICING.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, September 3, 1864.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, September 3, 1864.

TO MRS. GURNEY.

REPLY TO A COMMITTEE OF COLORED PEOPLE FROM BALTIMORE

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR PICKERING.

ORDER OF THANKS TO HUNDRED-DAY TROOPS FROM OHIO.

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO JAMES G. BLAINE. WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C., September

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL SLOUGH.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN. WASHINGTON, D. C., September 17,1864.

TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN.

INDORSEMENT CONCERNING AN EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS, SEPTEMBER 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL P. SHERIDAN. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, September

TO GENERAL HITCHCOCK,

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TO POSTMASTER-GENERAL BLAIR.

ORDER CONCERNING THE PURCHASE OF PRODUCTS IN INSURRECTIONARY STATES.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. T. SHERMAN. WASHINGTON, D. C., September 27, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D.C., September 29,1864.

INDORSEMENT.

ORDER RETURNING THANKS TO THE VOLUNTEERS FOR ONE HUNDRED DAYS

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

INDORSEMENT ON A MEMORANDUM BY GENERAL McDOWELL, OCTOBER 7, 1864

TO H. W. HOFFMAN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN.

TELEGRAM TO ROBERT T. LINCOLN, Cambridge, Mass.:

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., October 12, 1864.

RESPONSE TO A SERENADE,

PROCLAMATION OF THANKSGIVING, OCTOBER 20, 1864.

TELEGRAM To J. G. NICOLAY. WASHINGTON, D. C., October 21, 1864. 9.45 P.M.

TO WILLIAM B. CAMPBELL AND OTHERS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. H. THOMAS. WASHINGTON, D. C., October 23, 1864 5

TELEGRAM TO T. T. DAVIS. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D.C., October 31,

PROCLAMATION ADMITTING NEVADA INTO THE UNION

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURBRIDGE.

TELEGRAM TO NAVAL OFFICER AT MOBILE BAY.

TELEGRAM TO SAILORS' FAIR, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

TELEGRAM TO A. H. RICE.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY SEWARD. WASHINGTON, November 8, 1864.

RESPONSE TO A SERENADE, NOVEMBER 9, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO H. W. HOFFMAN. WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON, D. C. November 10,

ON DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENT

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. O. BURBRIDGE. WASHINGTON, D.C., November 10, 1864.

WASHINGTON, D.C., November 10, 1864. GOVERNOR BRAMLETTE, Frankfort, Ky.:

TO GENERAL S. A. HURLBUT.

REPLY TO MARYLAND UNION COMMITTEE, NOVEMBER 17, 1864.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING BLOCKADE, NOVEMBER 19, 1864

FIVE-STAR MOTHER

TO J. PHILLIPS.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR BRAMLETTE. WASHINGTON, D. C. NOVEMBER 22, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN, WASHINGTON, D.C., NOVEMBER 25, 1864

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ROSECRANS. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON D.C., NOV.

MEMORANDUM,

ORDER CONCERNING THE STEAMER "FUNAYMA SOLACE."

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CONGRESS,

RESPONSE TO A SERENADE, DECEMBER 6, 1864.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR HALL.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL FASLEIGH.

ORDER APPOINTING COMMISSIONERS

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G, H. THOMAS. WASHINGTON, D.C., December 16, 1864.

ORIGIN OF THE "GREENBACK" CURRENCY

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER IN COMMAND AT CHATTANOOGA. EXECUTIVE MANSION,

CALL FOR 300,000 VOLUNTEERS, DECEMBER 19, 1864.

SHERMAN'S MARCH TO THE SEA

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER IN COMMAND AT LEXINGTON.

TO J. MACLEAN.

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER IN COMMAND AT NASHVILLE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL WARNER.

1865

TELEGRAM TO J. WILLIAMS.

MESSAGE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL GRANT.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS,

TO SCHUYLER COLFAX.

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING COMMERCE, JANUARY 10, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL B. F. BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL B. F. BUTLER.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. M. DODGE. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, January

FIRST OVERTURES FOR SURRENDER FROM DAVIS

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DODGE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ORD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. M. DODGE.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON.

REPLY TO A COMMITTEE, JANUARY 24, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL GRANT.

EARLY CONSULTATIONS WITH REBELS

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY OF WAR TO GENERAL ORD.

INDORSEMENT ON A LETTER FROM J. M. ASHLEY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

INSTRUCTIONS TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT FOR THE ABOLISHING OF SLAVERY

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, February 1, 1865

TELEGRAM TO MAJOR ECKERT. WASHINGTON, D. C., February 1, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., February 2, 1865

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY SEWARD, WASHINGTON, D. C., February 2, 1865.

ORDER TO MAKE CORRECTIONS IN THE DRAFT.

TO PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL.

TELEGRAM TO LIEUTENANT-COLONEL GLENN.

TO GOVERNOR SMITH.

MESSAGE TO CONGRESS.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, February

RESULT OF THE ELECTORAL COUNT

CHRONOLOGIC REVIEW OF PEACE PROPOSALS

Afterwards Mr. Blair dictated for and authorized me to make an entry on

Afterwards the Secretary of War placed in my hands the following telegram,

MESSAGE TO THE SENATE. WASHINGTON, February 10, 1865

MR. SEWARD TO MR. ADAMS.

TO ADMIRAL DAVID D. PORTER.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. POPE.

TO THE COMMANDING OFFICERS IN WEST TENNESSEE

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. POPE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL POPE.

PROCLAMATION CONVENING THE SENATE IN EXTRA SESSION,

TELEGRAM TO OFFICER IN COMMAND AT HARPER'S FERRY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL POPE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, February 25, 1865

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., February 27, 1865.

TO T. W. CONWAY.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., March 2, 1865.

TELEGRAM FROM SECRETARY STANTON TO GENERAL GRANT.

SECOND INAUGURAL ADDRESS, MARCH 4, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL JOHN POPE.

TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. WASHINGTON, D. C., March 8, 1865.

PROCLAMATION OFFERING PARDON TO DESERTERS,

TELEGRAM TO H. T. BLOW.

LETTER TO THURLOW WEED,

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL ROUGH AND OTHERS.

ADDRESS TO AN INDIANA REGIMENT,

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING INDIANS,

ORDER ANNULLING THE SENTENCE

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. POPE.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL ORD.

TELEGRAM TO JUDGE SCATES.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL W. S. HANCOCK.

ANOTHER FEMALE SPY

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U.S. GRANT. CITY POINT, April 1, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAMS TO SECRETARY STANTON. CITY POINT, VIRGINIA, April 2, 1865. 8.30

TELEGRAM TO MRS. LINCOLN. CITY POINT, VA., April 1, 1865.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL U. S. GRANT.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. WEITZEL.

TELEGRAM TO SECRETARY STANTON.

LET THE THING BE PRESSED.

NOTE ON A CARD TO SECRETARY STANTON.

RESPONSE TO A CALL,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. H. GORDON.

PROCLAMATION CLOSING CERTAIN PORTS, APRIL 11, 1865.

PROCLAMATION OPENING THE PORT OF KEY WEST,

PROCLAMATION CLAIMING EQUALITY OF RIGHTS WITH ALL MARITIME NATIONS,

LAST PUBLIC ADDRESS,

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. WEITZEL.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL G. WEITZEL. WASHINGTON, D.C., April 12, 1865.

INTERVIEW WITH SCHUYLER COLFAX ON THE MORNING OF APRIL 14, 1865.

TO GENERAL VAN ALLEN.

LINCOLN'S LAST WRITTEN WORDS

The Papers and Writings of Abraham Lincoln

Jazzybee Verlag Jürgen Beck

86450 Altenmünster, Germany

ISBN: 97838496200103

www.jazzybee-verlag.de

[email protected]

ABRAHAM LINCOLN – A CONCISE BIOGRAPHY

THE life of Abraham Lincoln is a most potent illustration of the fact that good parts make great actors. A typical American from boyhood to death, he started with nothing, utilizing every opportunity for advancement, and honestly earning a right to live forever enshrined in the heart of his country.

The Republican party was born of public necessity during the administration of Washington and the elder Adams, and kept its organization and faith till 1833, when it was temporarily dissolved. Twenty-three years later it was re-formed for the defence of freedom of the person, of speech, and of the press, and for resistance to the usurpations resulting from the substitution of the Calhoun policy for that of the Declaration of Independence. The choice of Abraham Lincoln for President marked the victory of the reformed party, and the immortal standard-bearer led them on to greater triumphs.

The Lincolns originally came from England, settling in Hingham, Mass., about 1638; thence they moved to Pennsylvania; and, in 1782, again westward; till Abraham Lincoln, grandfather of the President, entered four hundred acres of land on the south side of Licking Creek, under a government warrant, and built a log cabin near Fort Beargrass, the site of the present city of Louisville, Ky. In the second year of their Kentucky settlement, Abraham and one of his sons were at work in the field when waylaid by an Indian, who fired from ambush, and killed the father. Two elder sons were chopping wood in the forest near at hand. One of them ran for help; the other turned to the cabin, seized the ever-ready rifle, and, looking through one of the port-holes, he saw the Indian grasp his youngest brother, Tom, then only six years old, and start with him for the woods. Levelling the rifle, he shot the Indian , and the boy, liberated by the death of his captor, sprang to his feet, and fled to the cabin; thus, almost miraculously, the father of President Lincoln was saved from the Indians.

In the wilderness of Kentucky there were few gleams of light; no schools, and scanty means for acquiring even the art of reading and writing; and here, in the rude life of the frontier, in ignorance and poverty, the father of President Lincoln grew to be a man. He was unable to read until after his marriage; but to his credit it should be said that he resolved that no child of his should ever be crippled as he had been. He married Nancy Hanks, and took the young bride to a rude log cabin which he had built for himself near Nolin Creek, in what is now Larue County, Ky. In this cabin, on the 12th of February, 1809, Abraham Lincoln was born. While he was yet an infant, the family removed to another log cabin not far distant, and in these two Lincoln spent the first seven years of his life.

His mother was a woman of great force of character, and passionately fond of reading. President Lincoln often said of her, that his earliest recollections of his mother were of sitting at her feet, and listening to the tales and legends that she read. She was also a skilful hunter, and with her rifle more than once brought down the bear and deer, while with her hands she dressed the flesh and prepared it for the family table, and wrought garments for the family from the skins.

When Abraham Lincoln was in his seventh year, Zachariah Riney moved into the neighborhood, and the lad was sent to school to him. Riney was a Catholic, however, and the Protestant children attending his humble school were withdrawn whenever any religious exercises were held. A little later he had the opportunity of being taught by Caleb Hazel for three months. Lincoln was a full-grown lad when he first saw a church; and his first notion of public speaking was taken from the itinerant preacher, Parson Elkin, who now and then passed their way.

Thomas Lincoln being of a somewhat unsettled nature, like many another pioneer, thought that he saw better advantages farther west; and listening to the wonderful tales of rich soil, abundant game, fine timber, and good pasturage in Indiana, he resolved to go West. He found a newcomer who was willing to take his partly improved farm and log cabin for ten barrels of whiskey and twenty dollars in cash. Aided by his boys he built a flat-boat, and launched it upon Rolling Fork, which empties into the Ohio, loaded his ten barrels of whiskey and heavier articles of furniture upon it, and floated off down the Ohio; but the frail craft upset, and with what little could be saved from the wreck, Thomas Lincoln landed at Thompson's Ferry, and there found an ox-cart to transport him with his slender stock of valuables to Spencer County, Ind., about eighteen miles from the river. The children, left at home with their mother, attended school, and snared game for the family table. One bed-ticking filled with dried forest leaves sufficed for their rest at night, and early in the morning the future President was out chopping wood for the day's fire.

At last the father returned, and the long journey to Indiana was undertaken. At night they slept on the fragrant pine-twigs, and by day they plodded on their way toward the Ohio River. By all sorts of expedients the little family contrived to get from one home to the other, where, on a grassy knoll in the heart of the untrodden forest, they fixed upon the site of their future dwelling. A hunter's camp was all that could be built to shelter them during their first winter. One side was entirely open, except as it was screened with the half-dressed skins of wild animals. Here the future President spent his first winter in the State of Indiana.

Thorns were used for pins in his home; bits of bone covered with cloth did duty for buttons; crusts of rye bread, well burned, were substituted for coffee; the dried leaves of sundry native herbs took the place of tea. Corn-whiskey tempered with water was a common drink of the country, and one of the readiest forms of business currency. There were no neighbors to drop in with friendly gossip, no boats to vex the waters of the western rivers. Even when one of the settlers of that region knew how to write, it would require months sometimes for his letter to reach the eastern world; and only as a faint echo now and then came a whisper of politics and national affairs.

James Madison was the President of the United States, and the country was greatly disturbed over the admission of Missouri, the extension of slavery, and other matters of great moment , but little or none of the excitement ever reached the log cabin. Through the winter Abraham Lincoln aided his father in felling logs for a more substantial cabin; and in the spring all the available neighbors were convened, the logs were rolled out of the woods, and one by one fitted into their places in the shape of four walls. Gables were fixed in position with wooden pins, and the log cabin was complete. The floor was the solid ground, and the cracks between the logs were " chinked " with thin strips of wood. No wonder that little " Abe " mastered the art of splitting rails, and imbibed a knowledge of woodcraft which clung to him forever.

During their first year in Indiana the mother was stricken down by hard work, exposure, and continual anxiety, and died on the 5th of October. There were no funeral ceremonies, for there was no one to conduct them; but long after, when the spot where she lay was covered with the wreck of the forest and almost hidden, her son was wont to say, " All that I am or hope to be, I owe to my mother."

Boys of the present age, turning languidly over the piles of books at their command, would wonder at the little stock that made Abraham Lincoln's heart glad in those sad times. His library consisted of the Bible, " Aesop's Fables," and "Pilgrim's Progress." On these three his literary tastes were formed. He read the books till he could repeat from memory many chapters of the Bible, the most striking passages of Bunyan's story, and every one of Aesop's fables. Then he secured a copy of the lives and characters of eminent men, and from the day when he first read the biography of the great Kentuckian, Lincoln dated his undying admiration for Henry Clay. Then he obtained Ramsay's "Life of Washington , " and hearing of another "Life of Washington,"" written by Weems, he made a long journey to borrow it, and joyfully carried it home in the bosom of his hunting-shirt. A storm at night washed through the chinks of the logs in the cabin, and damaged the book, and with a heavy heart he carried it back to Mr. Crawford, who had loaned it to him. He offered to do any thing in settlement which Mr. Crawford thought fair and just, and it was finally agreed that Abe should "pull fodder" for three days for Mr. Crawford.

" Does that pay for the book, or for the damage done to it? " asked the boy, taking his first lesson in worldly wisdom. Mr. Crawford "allowed" that he had considered the book practically worthless, and that the work paid for it, so that it became the first book that Abraham Lincoln purchased , and discolored and blistered though it was, it was to him of incalculable value.

In the autumn of 1819 Thomas Lincoln went off into Kentucky, leaving the children to take care of themselves; but in December he returned, bringing a new mother for them, and a store of what to the children of the wilderness seemed a gorgeous array of housekeeping utensils; a table, chairs, a bureau, crockery, knives, forks, and other incidentals, which to-day are considered the necessaries of life; but which, until then, the Lincoln family had lived without. The new mother and her stepson became fast friends from the start, and she said of him afterward, " He never gave me a cross word or look, and never refused in fact or appearance to do any thing that I requested of him." From this time, matters began to look brighter in the Lincoln family. Neighbors became more abundant, and the school, with its coveted facilities for obtaining knowledge, was within reach.

At the age of seventeen, an accident led Lincoln into the vicinity of Booneville. There hearing that one of the famous Breckinridges of Kentucky was to speak for the defence in a murder trial, he went on to Booneville, and in dumb wonder listened to the first important speech which he had ever heard. Lincoln could not restrain himself; and as the eminent lawyer passed out of the court-house, he found himself intercepted by a tall, over-grown youth, awkward, horny-handed, and evidently of the poorer class, who timidly held out his hand to him. But the aristocratic Breckinridge stared in surprise at the intrusive stranger, and hastily passed without further notice the future President of the United States. The boy had learned a grand lesson in oratory, however, and he was as grateful to Breckinridge for it as he would have been had the great man been as gracious to him then as he was years afterward, when he was reminded by the President in Washington of the little incident in Boonville. From that moment his enthusiasm for speech-making knew no bounds. His father was at last obliged to interfere, and forbid his making speeches during work hours. The old man grumbled, " When Abe begins to speak, all hands stop work to hear him."

In every possible sense of the word, at twenty years of age, Abraham Lincoln was a self-made man. What he had learned, he had learned by himself; what he knew, he knew with absolute accuracy. Self-taught, self-dependent, self-reliant.

In the spring of 1830 the entire family made another move to the West, across the prairies to Illinois, near to the village of Decatur. The entire outfit consisted of one wagon, drawn by four oxen, and driven by Abraham Lincoln. When at last the family were well settled upon the new ground, young Lincoln determined that it was time for him to strike out for himself. He was twenty-one years old, and able and anxious to earn his own living. He engaged himself with a party that was taking a flat-boat loaded with produce down the river to New Orleans. Thus he visited the land of slavery, and saw its peculiar institutions, and thus he formed his first opinions of slavery. He succeeded so well with the cargo that the owner employed him to take charge of a country store at New Salem, Ill., where he at once established himself as a great favorite.