The Dutch Shoe Mystery - Ellery Queen - ebook
Opis

Queen visits an operating theater to witness a surgery, but finds a murder instead The son of a police detective, Ellery Queen grew up in a bloody atmosphere. Since he started lending his deductive powers to the New York City homicide squad, he has seen more than his fair share of mangled corpses. Though he is accustomed to gore, the thought of seeing a living person sliced open makes him ill. So when a doctor invites him to sit in on an operation, Queen braces his stomach. As it happens, his stomach is spared, but his brain must go to work. The patient is Abigail Doorn, a millionairess in a diabetic coma. To prepare her for surgery, the hospital staff has stabilized her blood sugar level and wheeled her to the operating theater - but just before the first incision, the doctors realize she is dead, strangled while lying unconscious on her gurney. Queen came to the hospital to watch surgeons work, but now it's his time to operate. Review quote: "A new Ellery Queen book has always been something to look forward to for many years now." - Agatha Christie "Ellery Queen is the American detective story." - Anthony Boucher, author of Nine Times Nine "A great way to visit Moscow without having to live there." - San Jose Mercury News Biographical note: Ellery Queen was a pen name created and shared by two cousins, Frederic Dannay (1905-1982) and Manfred B. Lee (1905-1971), as well as the name of their most famous detective. Born in Brooklyn, they spent forty-two years writing, editing, and anthologizing under the name, gaining a reputation as the foremost American authors of the Golden Age "fair play" mystery. Although eventually famous on television and radio, Queen's first appearance came in 1928, when the cousins won a mystery-writing contest with the book that was later published as The Roman Hat Mystery. Their character was an amateur detective who uses his spare time to assist his police inspector uncle in solving baffling crimes. Besides writing the Queen novels, Dannay and Lee cofounded Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, one of the most influential crime publications of all time. Although Dannay outlived his cousin by nine years, he retired Queen upon Lee's death.

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CONTENTS

Cover

About the Book

About the Author

Title Page

Copyright Page

Dedication

FOREWORD

CHARACTER LIST

PART ITALE OF TWO SHOES

1

OPERATION

2

AGITATION

3

VISITATION

4

REVELATION

5

STRANGULATION

6

EXAMINATION

7

IMPERSONATION

8

CORROBORATION

9

IMPLICATION

10

MANIFESTATION

11

INTERROGATION

12

EXPERIMENTATION

13

ADMINISTRATION

14

ADORATION

15

COMPLICATION

16

ALIENATION

17

MYSTIFICATION

18

CONDENSATION

PART IIDISAPPEARANCE OF A CABINET

19

DESTINATION

20

CAPITULATION

21

DUPLICATION

22

ENUMERATION

23

TRIPLICATION???

24

REEXAMINATION

25

SIMPLIFICATION

26

EQUATION

Challenge

TO THE READER

PART III

DISCOVERY OF A DOCUMENT

27

CLARIFICATION

28

ARGUMENTATION

29

TERMINATION

30

EXPLANATION

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About the Book

Queen visits an operating theater to witness a surgery, but finds a murder instead

The son of a police detective, Ellery Queen grew up in a bloody atmosphere. Since he started lending his deductive powers to the New York City homicide squad, he has seen more than his fair share of mangled corpses. Though he is accustomed to gore, the thought of seeing a living person sliced open makes him ill. So when a doctor invites him to sit in on an operation, Queen braces his stomach. As it happens, his stomach is spared, but his brain must go to work.

The patient is Abigail Doorn, a millionairess in a diabetic coma. To prepare her for surgery, the hospital staff has stabilized her blood sugar level and wheeled her to the operating theater - but just before the first incision, the doctors realize she is dead, strangled while lying unconscious on her gurney. Queen came to the hospital to watch surgeons work, but now it’s his time to operate.

Review quote:

“A new Ellery Queen book has always been something to look forward to for many years now.”  - Agatha Christie

“Ellery Queen is the American detective story.” - Anthony Boucher, author of Nine Times Nine 

“A great way to visit Moscow without having to live there.” - San Jose Mercury News

About the Author

Ellery Queen was a pen name created and shared by two cousins, Frederic Dannay (1905–1982) and Manfred B. Lee (1905–1971), as well as the name of their most famous detective. Born in Brooklyn, they spent forty-two years writing, editing, and anthologizing under the name, gaining a reputation as the foremost American authors of the Golden Age “fair play” mystery.

Although eventually famous on television and radio, Queen’s first appearance came in 1928, when the cousins won a mystery-writing contest with the book that would eventually be published as The Roman Hat Mystery. Their character was an amateur detective who uses his spare time to assist his police inspector uncle in solving baffling crimes. Besides writing the Queen novels, Dannay and Lee cofounded Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, one of the most influential crime publications of all time. Although Dannay outlived his cousin by nine years, he retired Queen upon Lee’s death.

The Dutch Shoe Mystery

Ellery Queen

 

BASTEI ENTERTAINMENT

 

Bastei Entertainment is an imprint of Bastei Lübbe AG

 

Copyright © 2014 by Bastei Lübbe AG, Schanzenstraße 6-20, 51063 Cologne, Germany

 

For the original edition:

Copyright © 2013 by The Mysterious Press, LLC, 58 Warren Street, New York, NY. U.S.A.

 

Copyright © 1931 by Ellery Queen; copyright renewed 1959 by Ellery Queen

 

Project management: Lori Herber

Cover adaptation: Christin Wilhelm, www.grafic4u.de

Cover design by Jim Tierney

 

E-book production: Jouve Germany GmbH & Co. KG

 

ISBN 978-3-95859-405-0

 

www.luebbe.de

www.bastei-entertainment.com

 

All rights reserved, including without limitation the right to reproduce this e-book or any portion thereof in any form or by any means, whether electronic or mechanical, now known or hereinafter invented, without the express written permission of the publisher.

 

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, businesses, companies, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.

 

To DR. S. J. ESSENSON

FOR HIS INVALUABLE ADVICE ON CERTAIN MEDICAL MATTERS

FOREWORD

THE DUTCH SHOE MYSTERY (a whimsicality of title which will explain itself in the course of reading) is the third adventure of the questing Queens to be presented to the public. And for the third time I find myself delegated to perform the task of introduction. It seems that my labored articulation as oracle of the previous Ellery Queen novels discouraged neither Ellery’s publisher nor that omnipotent gentleman himself. Ellery avers gravely that this is my reward for engineering the publication of his fictionized memoirs. I suspect from his tone that he meant “reward” to be synonymous with “punishment”!

There is little I can say about the Queens, even as a privileged friend, that the reading public does not know or has not guessed from hints dropped here and there in Opus 1* and Opus 2.* Under their real names (one secret they demand be kept) Queen père and Queen fils were integral, I might even say major, cogs in the wheel of New York City’s police machinery. Particularly during the second and third decades of the century. Their memory flourishes fresh and green among certain ex-officials of the metropolis; it is tangibly preserved in case records at Centre Street and in the crime mementoes housed in their old 87th Street apartment, now a private museum maintained by a sentimental few who have excellent reason to be grateful.

As for contemporary history, it may be dismissed with this: the entire Queen ménage, comprising old Inspector Richard, Ellery, his wife, their infant son and gypsy Djuna, is still immersed in the peace of the Italian hills, to all practical purpose retired from the manhunting scene. …

I remember clearly the gasp of horror, the babble of conjecture that rippled outward from New York, spreading through the civilized world, when it was learned that Abigail Doorn, the mighty, had been murdered like any poor defenseless devil. She was of course a figure of international stature—an eccentric whose least financial operation, whose quietest benefaction, whose most ordinary family affair were automatically front-page news. Distinctly a “press personality,” she was one of perhaps two dozen in the past decade who, struggle or protest as they might, could not escape the all-seeing eye of the journalistic and consequently the lay world.

Ellery’s pertinacity in resolving the strange and perplexing circumstances which accompanied Abigail Doorn’s death, his masterly manipulation of the many people involved—some famous, some wealthy, some merely notorious—and his astonishing revelations at the last, added considerably to the prestige of the old Inspector and privately, needless to say, magnified Ellery’s reputation as adviser extraordinary to the Police Department.

Please bear in mind that the story about which The Dutch Shoe Mystery revolves is in essence truth, although from policy names have been altered and for fictional purposes certain details revised.

In this puzzling chase Ellery indisputably reaches the full blossom of his mental prowess. Not even the maze of the Monte Field investigation or the remarkable complexity of the French murder case demanded more of that amazing intellect. I firmly believe that no keener deductive mind has ever, in fact or fiction, probed the murky depths of criminal psychology or unraveled the twisted skeins of criminal deception. I wish you pleasure in the reading!

J. J. McC.

*The Roman Hat Mystery; The French Powder Mystery; Signet Books, The New American Library, Inc.

CHARACTERS

ABIGAIL DOORN a millionairess

HULDA DOORN an heiress

HENDRIK DOORN an ovis ebenus

SARAH FULLER a companion

DR. FRANCIS JANNEY a Head Surgeon

DR. LUCIUS DUNNING a diagnostician

EDITH DUNNING a sociologist

DR. FLORENCE PENNINI an obstetrician

DR. JOHN MINCHEN a Medical Director

DR. ARTHUR LESLIE a surgeon

DR. ROBERT GOLD an interne

DR. EDWARD BYERS an anæsthetist

LUCILLE PRICE a trained nurse

GRACE OBERMANN a trained nurse

MORITZ KNEISEL a “genius”

JAMES PARADISE a superintendent

ISAAC COBB a “special”

PHILIP MOREHOUSE an attorney

MICHAEL CUDAHY a racketeer

THOMAS SWANSON a mystery

LITTLE WILLIE, JOE GECKO, SNAPPER a bodyguard

BRISTOL a butler

PETE HARPER a newspaperman

HENRY SAMPSON a District Attorney

TIMOTHY CRONIN an assistant D. A.

DR. SAMUEL PROUTY a Medical Examiner

THOMAS VELIE a Detective-Sergeant

LIEUTENANT RITCHIE a District Detective

FLINT, RITTER, PIGGOTT, HESSE, JOHNSON a detective squad

INSPECTOR RICHARD QUEEN a policeman

ELLERY QUEEN an analyst

Part One

TALE OF TWO SHOES

“There are only two detectives for whom I have felt, in my own capacity as hunter-of-men, any deeply underlying sympathy … transcending racial idiosyncrasies and overleaping barriers of space and time. …These two, strangely enough, present the weird contrast of unreality, of fantasm and fact. One has achieved luminous fame between the boards of books; the other as kin to a veritable policeman. …I refer, of course, to those imperishables—Mr. Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street, London, and Mr. Ellery Queen of West 87th Street, New York City.”

—from 30 YEARS ON THE TRAIL

—by Dr. Max Pejchar *

*Ed. Note: Viennese police-consultant

Chapter One

OPERATION

INSPECTOR RICHARD QUEEN’SALTER ego, which was in startling contrast with his ordinarily spry and practical old manner, often prompted him to utter didactic remarks on the general subject of criminology. These professorial dicta were habitually addressed to his son and partner-in-crime-detection, Ellery Queen, in moments when they browsed before their living-room fire, alone except for the slippery shadow of Djuna, the wraith-like gypsy lad who served their domestic needs.

“The first five minutes are the most important,” the old man would say severely, “remember that.” It was his favorite theme. “The first five minutes can save you a heap of trouble.”

And Ellery, reared from boyhood on a diet of detectival advice, would grunt and suck his pipe and stare into the fire, wondering how often a detective was fortunate enough to be on the scene of a crime within three hundred seconds of its commission.

Here he would put his doubt into words, and the old man would nod sadly and agree—yes, it wasn’t very often that such luck came one’s way. By the time the investigator reached the scene the trail was cold, very cold. Then one did what one could to atone for the unsympathetic tardiness of fate. Djuna, hand me my snuff! …

Ellery Queen was no more the fatalist than he was the determinist, or pragmatist, or realist. His sole compromise with isms and ologies was an implicit belief in the gospel of the intellect, which has assumed many names and many endings through the history of thought. Here he swung wide of the fundamental professionalism of Inspector Queen. He despised the institution of police informers as beneath the dignity of original thinking; he pooh-poohed police methods of detection with their clumsy limitations—the limitations of any rule-plagued organization. “I’m one with Kant at least to this extent,” he liked to say, “that pure reason is the highest good of the human hodge-podge. For what one mind can conceive another mind can fathom …”

This was his philosophy in its simplest terms. He was very near to abandoning his faith during the investigation of Abigail Doorn’s murder. Perhaps for the first time in his sharply uncompromising intellectual career, doubt assailed him. Not doubt of his philosophy, which had proved itself many times over in former cases, but doubt of his mental capacity to unravel what another mind had conceived. Of course he was an egoist—“bobbing my head vigorously with Descartes and Fichte,” he used to remark … but for once in the extraordinary labyrinth of events surrounding the Doorn case he had overlooked fate, that troublesome trespasser on the private property of self-determination.

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

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