Fairy Stories and Fables - James Baldwin - ebook
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The longer stories in this book are called Fairy Stories, because that is the name by which such tales are always known to children; and yet only a very few contain any direct reference to fairies. The most of them have to do with talking animals and with strange incidents and transformations such as have always delighted the childish fancy. They have been drawn from a variety of sources; and liberty has been taken to make such changes in the narratives as seemed most necessary to adapt them to the understanding and needs of the children of our own time and country.   Free renderings, they may be called, of some of the most popular folktales of foreign lands. The Three Bears, Tom Thumb, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Tom Tit Tot are old English favorites dressed in modern garb; Little Red Riding Hood, Puss in Boots, Princet and the Golden Blackbird, and Drakesbill and his Friends are variants of the well-known French versions by Perrault, Marelles, and Sebillot; Little Tuppen and The Three Goats named Bruse are from Norwegian sources; and the rest are founded upon German originals. In the retelling of these tales care has been taken to avoid whatever might distress the most sensitive child as well as everything that could give a wrong bias to his moral nature or distort his perception of the beautiful and the true.

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Fairy Stories and Fables

James Baldwin

Illustrated by Arthur Rackham

Little Red-Riding Hood & Animals (Arthur Rackham)

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2017 by e-Kitap Projesi

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ISBN: 978-605-9496-60-5

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Table of Contents

About the Author:

CONCERNING THESE STORIES

LITTLE TUPPEN

THE DOG AND THE WOLF

THE MICE AND THE CAT

THE FOX IN THE WELL

THE THREE BEARS

THE DEER

THE WISE GOAT

THE THREE GOATS NAMED BRUSE

THE WOLVES, THE DOGS, AND THE SHEEP

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE

THE SILLY KID

THE THREE PIGS

THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

THE DOG AND THE SHADOW

LITTLE, RED RIDING HOOD

THE QUARREL

THE MILKMAID AND HER PAIL

THE STORYOF TOM THUMB

THE FOX WHO LOST HIS TAIL

THE WIND AND THE SUN

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK

THE FOX OUTWITTED

THE FARMER AND HIS SONS

THE BATTLE OF THE BEASTS

THE OLD LION

A WISE CROW

PETER AND THE MAGIC GOOSE

TWO FOOLISH BIRDS

THE LION'S SHARE

TOM TIT TOT

THE DOG IN THE MANGER

THE CAMEL AND HIS MASTER

CINDERELLA; OR, THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

THE MOUSE AND THE LION

THE FOX AND THE CRANE

PRINCET AND THE GOLDEN BLACKBIRD

THE FOOLISH TORTOISE

THE ANT AND THE CRICKET

PUSS IN BOOTS

THE HARES

DRAKESBILL AND HIS FRIENDS

THE TREE AND THE REEDS

THE NEST BUILDERS

THE LARK AND THE FARMER

THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE

Oh, dream not helm or harness

The sign of valor true;

Peace hath higher tests of manhood

Than battle ever knew.

- John G. Whittier

About the Author:

 

James Baldwin(1841 - 1925)

According to his biography in the Junior Book of Authors (1951), Baldwin, a native of Indiana and largely self-educated, began teaching at the age of 24. After several years he became superintendent of the graded schools in Indiana, a post he held for 18 years. The last 37 years of his life he worked with publishers, first with Harper and Brothers and later with the American Book Company. In addition to editing school books, he started writing books of his own. After the publication in 1882 of The Story of Siegfried, he went on to write more than 50 others.

His influence was widely felt because at one time it was estimated that of all the school books in use in the United States, over half had been written or edited by him. Unfortunately, his works are much less widely known today. So far as known, only some of his books are in print and published today.

 

Books:

Date

Story

Category

1882

The Story of Siegfried

Legends

1883

The Story of Roland

Legends

1887

A Story of the Golden Age of Greek Heroes

Mythology

1895

Fairy Stories and Fables

Readers

1895

Old Greek Stories

Mythology

1896

Fifty Famous Stories Retold

Collective Biography

1897

Four Great Americans

Collective Biography

1903

The Wonder-Book of Horses

Mythology

1904

Abraham Lincoln, A True Life

----

1905

Thirty More Famous Stories Retold

Collective Biography

1905

Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children

Adapted Literature

1907

An American Book of Golden Deeds

Ethical Faith Stories

1910

Stories of Don Quixote Written A new for Children

Fiction

1912

The Sampo

Legends

1912

Fifty Famous People

Collective Biography

1914

In My Youth

Individual Biography

 

***

 

 

CONCERNING THESE STORIES

The longer stories in this book are called Fairy Stories, because that is the name by which such tales are always known to children; and yet only a very few contain any direct reference to fairies. The most of them have to do with talking animals and with strange incidents and transformations such as have always delighted the childish fancy. They have been drawn from a variety of sources; and liberty has been taken to make such changes in the narratives as seemed most necessary to adapt them to the understanding and needs of the children of our own time and country. Free renderings, they may be called, of some of the most popular folktales of foreign lands. The Three Bears, Tom Thumb, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Tom Tit Tot are old English favorites dressed in modern garb; Little Red Riding Hood, Puss in Boots, Princet and the Golden Blackbird, and Drakesbill and his Friends are variants of the well-known French versions by Perrault, Marelles, and Sebillot; Little Tuppen and The Three Goats named Bruse are from Norwegian sources; and the rest are founded upon German originals. In the retelling of these tales care has been taken to avoid whatever might distress the most sensitive child as well as everything that could give a wrong bias to his moral nature or distort his perception of the beautiful and the true. The language, although not childish in form, is so adapted to the com­prehension of young children, that the stories may be read by them without difficulty—affording a greater pleasure, it is hoped, than any that could be derived from the mere hearing of them from the lips of others.

Most of the shorter stories, or Fables, are derived from the col­lection usually ascribed to Æsop, but of which Æsop was in nowise the author. An effort has been made to give them, in each in­stance, a form which is attractive to young readers and under­standable by them. In the case of The Ant and the Cricket, the well-known popular poem is repeated with but slight variations. In none of these Fables has the editor altered the generally accepted order of the narrative, or changed the purport of the lesson intended to be taught.

 

 

LITTLE TUPPEN

 

ONE day an old hen whose name was Cluck-cluck went into the woods with her little chick Tuppen to get some blueberries to eat. But a berry stuck fast in the little one's throat, and he fell upon the ground, choking and gasping. Cluck-cluck, in great fright, ran to fetch some water for him.

She ran to the Spring and said: "My dear Spring, please give me some water. I want it for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Spring said: "I will give you some water if you will bring me a cup."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to the Oak-tree and said: "Dear Oak-tree, please give me a cup. I want it for the Spring; and then the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Oak-tree said: "I will give you a cup if some one will shake my branches."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to Maid Marian, the wood-cutter's child, and said: "Dear Maid Marian, please shake the Oak-tree's branches; and then the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The wood-cutter's child, Maid Marian, said: "I will shake the Oak-tree's branches if you will give me some shoes."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to the Shoemaker and said: "Dear Shoemaker, please give me some shoes. I want them for Maid Marian, the wood-cutter's child; for then Maid Marian will shake the Oak-tree's branches, and the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Shoemaker said: "I will give you some shoes if you will give me some leather."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to Moo-moo, the Ox, and said: "Dear Moo-moo, please give me some leather. I want it for the Shoemaker; for then the Shoemaker will give me some shoes, and I will give the shoes to Maid Marian, and Maid Marian will shake the Oak-tree's branches, and the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Ox, Moo-moo, said: "I will give you some leather if you will give me some corn."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to the Farmer and said: "Dear Farmer, please give me some corn. I want it for Moo-moo, the Ox; for then the Ox will give me some leather; and I will give the leather to the Shoemaker, and the shoemaker will give me shoes, and I will give the shoes to Maid Marian, and Maid Marian will shake the Oak-tree's branches, and the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Farmer said: "I will give you some corn if you will give me a plow."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to the Blacksmith and said: "Dear Blacksmith, please give me a plow. I want it for the Farmer; for then the Farmer will give me some corn, and I will give the corn to the Ox, and the Ox will give me leather, and I will give the leather to the Shoemaker, and the Shoemaker will give me shoes, and I will give the shoes to Maid Marian, and Maid Marian will shake the Oak-tree's branches, and the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The Blacksmith said: "I will give you a plow if you will give me some iron."

Then Cluck-cluck ran to the busy little Dwarfs who live under the mountains and have all the iron that is found in the mines. "Dear, dear Dwarfs," she said, "please give me some of your iron. I want it for the Blacksmith; for then the Blacksmith will give me a plow, and I will give the plow to the Farmer, and the Farmer will give me corn, and I will give the corn to the Ox, and the Ox will give me leather, and I will give the leather to the Shoemaker, and the Shoemaker will give me shoes, and I will give the shoes to Maid Marian, and Maid Marian will shake the Oak-tree's branches, and the Oak-tree will give me a cup, and I will give the cup to the Spring, and the Spring will give me water for my little chick Tuppen, who lies choking and gasping under the blueberry bush in the green woods."

The little Dwarfs who live under the mountains had pity on poor Cluck-cluck, and they gave her a great heap of red iron ore from their mines.

Then she gave the iron to the Blacksmith, and the plow to the Farmer, and the corn to the Ox, and the leather to the Shoemaker, and the shoes to Maid Marian; and Maid Marian shook the Oak-tree, and the Spring got the acorn cup, and Cluck-cluck carried it full of water to her little chick Tuppen.

 

Then little Tuppen drank the water, and was well again, and ran chirping and singing among the long grass, as if nothing had happened to him.

 

 

THE DOG AND THE WOLF

ONE warm day a Dog lay down under a tree in a field, and was soon fast asleep. In a little while a Wolf came out of the woods and was about to seize him and eat him up.

"Cousin Wolf," cried the Dog, "don't you see how thin I am? I am not fit for you to eat now. If you will only wait a few days, you will find that I shall make you a better meal. Master is going to have a big dinner next week, and then there will be so much to eat that I shall grow plump and fat."

 

"Well, if that is the case," said the Wolf, "I think I will wait a little while. You may go now, and live till after the dinner."

In two weeks the Wolf came back, but the Dog was not in the field. He was asleep on the house top.

"Come down, and let me see how fat you are," said the Wolf.

The Dog woke up and said: "Cousin Wolf, if you ever find me asleep in the field again, you may eat me. But if you are wise, you will not wait till after the master has had that big dinner."

 

 

THE MICE AND THE CAT

AN OLD Cat was in a fair way to kill all the Mice in the barn. One day the Mice met to talk about the great harm that she was doing them. Each one told of some plan by which to keep out of her way.

"Do as I say," said a gray-bearded Mouse who was thought to be very wise,—"Do as I say: Hang a bell to the Cat's neck, and then when we hear it ring, we shall know that she is coming."

"Good! good!" said all the rest; and they ran to get the bell.

 

"Now, which one of you will hang it to the Cat's neck?" asked the wise one with the gray beard.

"Not I! not I!" cried all the Mice at once.

 

THE FOX IN THE WELL

A FOX was going through a field one day, and fell into a well. He was not hurt at all, but he could not get out. He called for help as loud as he could, but no one heard him for a long time. By and by a Wolf passed that way and stopped to listen. Then he went to the edge of the well and looked down.

 

"Who is there?" he asked. "Dear Wolf, it is I," cried the Fox; "and I am so glad that you have come. You will help me out, I am sure."

"Poor little Foxie!" said the Wolf; "how did you get down there? How long have you been there? It must be very damp so deep down in a well like this. I do pity you with all my heart. You might catch cold in such a place; and how sad it would be if you were to die!"

"Oh, Wolf, Wolf!" cried the Fox. "This is no time to talk. Help me out, quick, and then pity me afterwards."

 

 

THE THREE BEARS

 

NOT far from the edge of a pleasant wood there once lived three Bears. They were kind, good Bears, not rude, wild fellows like those that live now; and they had built for themselves a snug little house, with one door and one window, and a wild vine running over the roof. But the strangest thing about them was that they were all just alike except in size. One of them was a Little Wee Bear, and one was a Middle-sized Bear, and one was a Great Huge Bear.

They had everything in their house that three Bears could want. They had a little wee bowl for the Little Wee Bear, and a middle-sized bowl for the Middle-sized Bear, and a great huge bowl for the Great Huge Bear. They had a little wee chair for the Little Wee Bear, and a middle-sized chair for the Middle-sized Bear, and a great huge chair for the Great Huge Bear. And they had a little wee bed for the Little Wee Bear, and a middle-sized bed for the Middle-sized Bear, and a great huge bed for the Great Huge Bear. And that was all.

One morning they had soup for breakfast; but when it was first poured into their bowls it was so hot that they could not touch their tongues to it.

 

"Let us take a walk over the hill," said the Middle-sized Bear; "and, by the time we get back, the soup will be cool enough to eat."

They were very good-natured Bears, even when they were hungry, and so without another word they all went out for the walk. The Great Huge Bear went first, the Middle-sized Bear went next, and the Little Wee Bear went last.

They had not been gone long when a little girl named Silver-hair came that way. When she saw the snug little house with the wild vine running over the roof, she wondered whose it could be. Then she stopped and peeped in at the window. She thought it was a very queer house, and in a little while she went round to the door and knocked.

Nobody answered. She wondered if all the people were asleep. She knocked again, very loud. They must be away from home. She lifted the latch softly, and the door opened. Everything seemed so cozy in the little sitting room that she thought she would step inside for a few minutes and rest herself, for indeed she was very, very tired.

She looked around. There were the three bowls of soup on the floor, where they had been put to cool. She was hungry, and thought it would be so nice to try a mouthful of the soup.

She tasted that which was in the largest bowl; but it was too cold. Then she tasted that which was in the middle-sized bowl; but it was too hot. Then she tasted that which was in the little bowl; and it was so good that she ate it all up.

On the other side of the room were three chairs, all just alike except in size, and she thought it would be very nice to sit down and rest before going home. She first tried the great huge chair; but it was too high. Then she tried the middle-sized chair; but it was too broad. Then she tried the little chair; and, since it was just right, she sat down in it so hard that she broke it in pieces.

She next looked at the beds in the bedroom, and thought how nice it would be to take a short nap before going home. She first tried the great huge bed; but it was too soft. Then she tried the middle-sized bed; but it was too hard. Then she tried the little bed; and, since it was just right, she lay down upon it and was soon fast asleep.

While she was sleeping, the three bears came home from their walk. They were hungry, and they made haste to look into the bowls. The Great Huge Bear took up his bowl first:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TASTING MY SOUP!"

he roared.

Then the Middle-sized Bear took up his bowl:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TASTING MY SOUP!"

he growled.

Then the Little Wee Bear took up his bowl:—

"Somebody has been tasting my soup,

and has eaten it all up!"

he whined.

Then they went across the room to sit in their chairs. The Great Huge Bear tried his chair first:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR!"

he roared.

Then the Middle-sized Bear tried his chair:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR"

he growled.

Then the Little Wee Bear tried his chair:—

"Somebody has been sitting in my chair,

and has broken it in pieces!"

he whined.

 

After that they went into the bedroom. The Great Huge Bear saw his bed first:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TUMBLING MY BED!"

he roared.

Then the Middle-sized Bear saw his bed:—

"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN TUMBLING MY BED!"

he growled.

And then the Little Wee Bear saw his bed:—

"Somebody has been tumbling my bed,"

he cried in a shrill piping voice,

"and here she is now!"

The noise made by the Little Wee Bear caused Silver-hair to wake up. When she opened her eyes and saw the three Bears so close to her, she was badly scared. She sprang up, and ran out of the house as fast as she could. The three Bears went to the door to look after her, and saw her running through the woods towards her own home. But they didn't follow her; they were too kind and good for that.

 

And that is all that I know about little Silver-hair and the three Bears that lived in their snug little house with the wild vine running over the roof.

 

 

THE DEER

ONE warm day a Deer went down to a brook to get a drink. The stream was smooth and clear, and he could see himself in the water. He looked at his horns and was very proud of them, for they were large and long and had many branches. But when he saw his feet he was ashamed to own them, they were so slim and small.