Volleyball Drills - Chris Kroeger - ebook

Volleyball Drills ebook

Chris Kroeger

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Opis

This book features basic drills and games designed to help players improve every aspect of their game. It is a working manual of organized and demanding drills from which practice lessons may be created. Each drill includes a detailed explanation of the purpose, setup, and execution, as well as variations and teaching points.

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Chris Kroeger (Institute of Sports Science – University Kiel, Germany) is instructor of the FIVB (International Volleyball Federation) and has conducted Coaches and Teachers Courses in more than 20 countries since 1985. He has won several National Youth and Student Titles.

Volleyball Drills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This book has been very carefully prepared, but no responsibility is taken for the correctness of the information it contains. Neither the author nor the publisher can assume liability for any damages or injuries resulting from information contained in this book.

Chris Kroeger

VOLLEYBALL DRILLS

 

 

Meyer & Meyer Sport

 

 

British Library Cataloguing in Publication DataA catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

Volleyball DrillsMaidenhead: Meyer & Meyer Sport (UK) Ltd., 2014ISBN: 9781782550242

All rights reserved, especially the right to copy and distribute, including the translation rights. No part of this work may be reproduced—including by photocopy, microfilm or any other means—processed, stored electronically, copied or distributed in any form whatsoever without the written permission of the publisher.

© 2014 by Meyer & Meyer Sport (UK) Ltd.Aachen, Auckland, Beirut, Budapest, Cairo, Cape Town, Dubai, Hägendorf, Indianapolis, Maidenhead, Singapore, Sydney, Tehran, WienMember of the World Sport Publishers’ Association (WSPA)Printed by: B.O.S.S Druck und Medien GmbH, GermanyISBN: 9781782550242eISBN 9781782553564E-Mail: [email protected]

CONTENTS

Preface

Key

Part 1: Serving Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 2: Receiving Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 3: Setting Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 4: Attacking Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 5: Blocking Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 6: Defensive Drills

Drills under simplified conditions

Drills for game-like situations

Drills for competition

Part 7: Basic Games for Beginners

Credits

PREFACE

This book contains a collection of approved drills and games that are suitable for trainings with learners and intermediate volleyball players. Additional information, especially concerning techniques (FIVB Technical Posters), drill designs and coaching principles (FIVB Coaches Manual 2011) can be found on the FIVB website:

http://www.fivb.org/EN/Technical-Coach/http://www.fivb.org/EN/Development/ The main “tools” of a coach basically consist of the ability to transform selected exercises into drills. The coach usually shapes the exercises by determining the following factors:

• precise, coherent and measurable explanations of the drills

• qualitative and quantitative criteria for determining success

• measurement of the drills’ effectiveness -intensity, extent and the recovery.

The load specifications should be set in relation to the actual dynamics of a competition:

• above a standard competition: the load of the drill is above a standard competition

• like a standard competition: the load of the drill is equal to a standard competition

• beneath a standard competition: the load of the drill is less in comparison to a standard competition.

Players who cannot actively participate in drills can take over the following functions:

• be the target area (the position of the setter in receiving drills)

• give feedback (counting of repetitions, qualitative feedback)

• collect balls (especially if they are rolling on the court)

• supply the coach or server with balls

• pass or hit balls (in defensive drills)

• be the referee.

The supervision and control of a drill are important in order to make it effective and work properly. The role the coach takes for the drill must be defined. In accordance with that definition, these are his options:

• a drill conducted by the coach (the coach needs good skills with the ball because he/she is an active part of the drill)

• a drill initiated by the coach (the rally is started by the coach, but in the following the drill is supervised without any active participation)

• a whole drill led by the players (the players are also supervising the drill).

According to the form of the drill, the location and different movement concepts will have direct influence on certain aspects of the coach’s observation. This means that in (3) the location of the coach may be on a neighbor’s court, whereas in (2) he/she might only observe certain transitions (e.g., transition from block to counterattack). Moreover, in (1) the coach could also observe only the individual defense technique of a single player.

Depending on the capacity of the gym, it is recommended to work on technique improvements only with smaller groups, while the majority of the group should be playing basic games or should be performing drills. After a couple of minutes, the small group changes with some players from the big group.

In order to hold basic games and drills the following equipment is useful:

• ball boxes (can be any available kind of containers; e.g., in a gym, one big or two small gymnastic boxes)

• platform for the coach at the net (two or more gymnastic boxes for a quick change of positions)

• playing areas and sectors (antennas, glue-strip, ties, pads, ropes)

• target areas (gymnastic hoops, cones, mats)

• visualization of balls’ and players’ paths (blackboard, magnet board).

CHOOSE

• Determine a focus for the training.

• Determine an exercise.

• Shape the exercise to a drill.

PRESENT

• Clarification of the objective

* Explain: what is important?

* Control and supervision standards for the coach

* Control standards for the players

• Organization

* Who? Number of players

* Where? Tactical instruction + space of action

* When? Time and space structures of the ball and players

* What? Equipment

DISTRIBUTE ROLES

• Determine the kind of supervision of the drill.

• Specify the responsibility and the consequences.

• Illustrate the organization of the balls and paths (of players and balls) using examples.

PERFORM

• The players need time to get into a flow/rhythm.

• The coach has to take up his/her suitable observation position.

• Allow time for the reflection.

SUPERVISE

• Look for accordance with the objective and deviations from it.

• Give feedback.

• Draw conclusions.

Pattern for a movement exercise (basic game or drill)

KEY

01 SERVING DRILLS

DRILL 1.1

Drills under simplified conditions

Equipment

• Every player is holding one ball

Drill Objective

Creation of a motion concept concerning the flap movement of the top-spin service.

Drill Description

The player is holding the ball in the left hand in a reachable distance in front of the right shoulder. Now, the player is performs the flap movement without dropping the ball (right-hander).

Drill Variations

• A partner is holding the ball in front of the playing arm of his/her partner

• Perform the flap movement with closed eyes

• Hit the ball with the hand in various spots (sidespin)

• Perform the same drill, but use your weak hand

Teaching Points

• Make sure to stand firmly

• The correct movement of the elbow is important

• The flap movement can be supported verbally by saying:

1. (elbow in the) “back” (of the head)

2. (elbow in) “front” (of the head)

3. “hit” (the ball)

DRILL 1.2

Drills under simplified conditions

Equipment

• Every player is holding one ball

Drill Objective

Creation of a motion concept concerning the jump service in three steps: 1. Runup. 2. Throw-off + run-up. 3. Regulated overall movement.

Drill Description

The players are standing on the court. The attack line functions as the base line.

Step 1: The players simulate the throw-off movement without a ball and try to internalize the take-off movement. The landing takes place on both legs in the attacking area.

Step 2: Instead of hitting the ball across the net, the players perform the service movement with their weak hand. Keep in mind to hit the ball in the highest possible spot.

Step 3: The players hit the ball across the net from variable positions and distances. Increase the distance of the run-up to the net as the net height is raised.

Drill Variations

• Support your run-up rhythm, verbally (stage 1)

• Vary your run-up direction (straight, curved); (stage 1)

• Use different types of balls (stage 2)

• Perform the overall movement with a tennis ball (stage 3)

Teaching Points

• Constantly increase the distance of the run-up and the run-up speed

• Variation in the throw-off techniques

DRILL 1.3

Drills under simplified conditions

Equipment

• Every player is holding one ball

Drill Objective

Accuracy

Drill Description

Perform a service against a wall and vary your distance from it (4-10 meters).

At the height of approximately 2.5-2.8m there are several targets attached to the wall (e.g., glue strip). Try to hit these targets and catch your ball before it hits the ground.

Drill Variations

• Instead of hitting the ball, throw it at the targets

• Increase the distance after successfully hitting the targets

• Perform an extra task before you catch the ball — extra tasks could include performing a 360° body rotation or putting both hands on the ground

• Perform a bump pass before you catch the ball

Teaching Points

• Improve your service accuracy by trying to hit smaller targets

DRILL 1.4

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• Two players are holding one ball

• Target areas (gymnastic-hoops, cardboard)

Drill Objective

Accuracy

Drill Description

A and B are standing in a target area. Alternately, they serve the balls in such a way that the partner can catch the ball without leaving his/her area. Both vary their position.

Drill Variations

• Form a group of four. On both sides of the court, two players stand behind each other — the first player is server, and the second player is receiver. If the service was successful, the partners switch their positions.

• Vary your service technique

• Both players stand in the target area

• Perform a bump pass before catching the ball

Teaching Points

• Slowly increase the distance between the target areas

• Try different angles if straight-line service is being performed well

DRILL 1.5

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• Two players are holding one ball

Drill Objective

The follow-up movement after the service into the field

Drill Description

Player A and B perform the throw-off simultaneously and hit the balls into a target area on the opposite field. The ball should be hit in such a way that the opponent isn’t able to catch it.

Drill Variations

• Instead of catching the ball right away, perform a vertical bump pass first and catch the ball afterward

• Competition with point count: signal is given for the throw-off

• First, practice this drill on one half of the longitudinal field

Teaching Points

• Slowly increase the distance between A and B (3m—6m—9m)

• The competition shouldn’t affect the serving technique

DRILL 1.6

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• Every player is holding one ball

• Target areas (cones, cardboard)

Drill Objective

Accuracy

Drill Description

The court is divided into six or more target areas (depending on the skills of the players). Every target area requires a certain number of trials. If the player is successful, he/she earns points.

Drill Variations

• Before performing the service, the player announces which of the target areas he/she will serve into

• Try different serving techniques

Teaching Points

• Depending on the level of performance, the sectors can vary in size

• Begin to practice one half of the court and proceed with practicing on the whole court

DRILL 1.7

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• Two players are holding one ball

• Sectors on the net (antennas)

Drill Objective

Accuracy

Drill Description

Two players face each other. The net is divided into smaller sectors with the use of antennas. The players serve the ball to each other (through the net sectors). During the drill, the distance to the net is constantly increased.

Drill Variations

• Vary the size of the sectors (glue strip between the antennas)

• Practice different serving techniques

Teaching Points

• The side drift in the trajectory of the float service is easier to detect if extra lines (90° angle to the net) are put on the ground

• Suitable for competition, as well

• Form groups and serve simultaneously through the different net sectors

DRILL 1.8

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• In groups of three players with two balls

Drill Objective

Internalization of the right place of contact at the ball during service

Drill Description

A stands very close to the net (1-2m) and serves a ball across the lowered net to B, who catches the ball and passes it on to C (later bump pass). In the same time A serves the ball, player B passes a second ball to C, who passes it to A (via ground pass). C varies his/her position so that B has to pass the ball at different angles.

Drill Variations

• The distance between A and B is slowly increased

• Use different serving techniques

Teaching Points

• The intensity of hitting is important in regard to the relatively short time intervals

DRILL 1.9

Drills for game-like situations

Equipment

• Two players are holding one ball

Drill Objective