Value for life. Respect for all life. - J Horsfield @ Hearts Minds Media - darmowy ebook
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The value and respect for all life. To include artificial in the future?by Hearts and Minds MediaThe value and respect for all life. To include artificial in the future?Respect for all lifeWe humans have big brains and advanced technology, but it does not mean we are superior and have dominance over nature. Sadly, we have taken it for granted that Earth and all its riches, including animals, were created for our benefit.We, like all other life forms, are part of nature. We depend on one another for survival. Humans, like other forms of life, cannot live without a healthy environment. It is only right that we take care of nature.“Any society which does not insist upon respect for all life must necessarily decay.” ~ Albert Einstein ~"Let us develop respect for all living things. Let us try to replace violence and intolerance with understanding and compassion. And love." ~ Jane Goodall ~"Nature holds the key to our aesthetic, intellectual, cognitive and even spiritual satisfaction." ~ E. O. Wilson ~Considering human beings and the sanctity of life in modern society.

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VALUE FOR LIFE. RESPECT FOR ALL LIFE.

Artifical life?

J Horsfield @ Hearts Minds Media

PRONOUN

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Copyright © 2017 by J Horsfield @ Hearts Minds Media

Interior design by Pronoun

Distribution by Pronoun

ISBN: 9781641861984

TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Measure Of A Man (episode)

Summary

Teaser

Act One

Act Two

Act Three

Act Four

Act Five

Memorable quotes

The value and respect for all life. To include artificial in the future?

Hearts Minds Media 2017

RESPECT FOR ALL LIFE

We humans have big brains and advanced technology, but it does not mean we are superior and have dominance over nature. Sadly, we have taken it for granted that Earth and all its riches, including animals, were created for our benefit.

We, like all other life forms, are part of nature. We depend on one another for survival. Humans, like other forms of life, cannot live without a healthy environment. It is only right that we take care of nature.

“Any society which does not insist upon respect for all life must necessarily decay.” ~ Albert Einstein ~

“Let us develop respect for all living things. Let us try to replace violence and intolerance with understanding and compassion. And love.“ ~ Jane Goodall ~

“Nature holds the key to our aesthetic, intellectual, cognitive and even spiritual satisfaction.“ ~ E. O. Wilson ~

Considering human beings and the sanctity of life in modern society.

From CS Lewis on intellectualism without humanity. Appropriate for movements which aim at removing humanity from humans. Men without Chests/Hearts.. Those who lack them lack the specifically human element, the trunk that unites intellectual man with visceral (animal) man, and may be called “men without chests”. The final chapter describes the ultimate consequences of this debunking: a distant future in which the values and morals of the majority are controlled by a small group who rule by a “perfect” understanding of psychology, and who in turn, being able to “see through” any system of morality that might induce them to act in a certain way, are ruled only by their own unreflected whims. In surrendering rational reflection on their own motivations, the controllers will no longer be recognizably human, the controlled will be robot-like, and the Abolition of Man will have been completed.

It is difficult to resist the conclusion that 20th century man has decided to abolish himself. Tired of the struggle to be himself, he has created boredom out of his own affluence, impotence out of his own erotomania, and vulnerability out of his own strength. He himself blows the trumpet, that brings the walls of his own cities crashing down. Until at last, having educated himself into imbecility, having drugged and polluted himself into stupefaction, he keels over a weary old brontosaurus and becomes extinct.

–Malcolm Muggeridge

British journalist of the 20th century

“In the 1950s kids lost their innocence.

They were liberated from their parents by well-paying jobs, cars, and lyrics in music that gave rise to a new term –the generation gap.

In the 1960s, kids lost their authority.

It was a decade of protest–church, state, and parents were all called into question and found wanting. Their authority was rejected, yet nothing ever replaced it.

In the 1970s, kids lost their love. It was the decade of me-ism dominated by hyphenated words beginning with self.

Self-image, Self-esteem, Self-assertion....It made for a lonely world. Kids learned everything there was to know about sex and forgot everything there was to know about love, and no one had the nerve to tell them there was a difference.

In the 1980s, kids lost their hope.

Stripped of innocence, authority and love and plagued by the horror of a nuclear nightmare, large and growing numbers of this generation stopped believing in the future.

In the 1990s kids lost their power to reason. Less and less were they taught the very basics of language, truth, and logic and they grew up with the irrationality of a postmodern world.

In the new millennium, kids woke up and found out that somewhere in the midst of all this change, they had lost their imagination. Violence and perversion entertained them till none could talk of killing innocents since none was innocent anymore.”

– Ravi Zacharias, Recapturing the Wonder of life..

The phrase “culture of life“ is a term used in discussion of moral theology, especially that of the Catholic Church. Its proponents describe it as a way of life based upon the theological truth that human life at all stages from conceptionthrough natural death is sacred. As such, a “culture of life” opposes practices destructive of human life, often including abortion, euthanasia, studies and medicines involving embryonic stem cells, contraception, capital punishment, unjust war, sadistic humiliation, narcissism, and excessive selfishness.

In United States politics, social conservatives frequently use the term “culture of life” in opposition to abortion and embryonic stem cell research.[1] In 2005, 68% of White evangelical Protestants in the United States opposed abortion, 58% opposed euthanasia and 15% opposed the death penalty.[2]

ORIGINS

Although various authors used the term from time to time, the expression “culture of life” entered popular parlance from Pope John Paul II, who first used it in a World Youth Day tour of the United States in 1993. Speaking to journalists at Stapleton International Airport near Denver, Colorado, the Pope denounced abortion and euthanasia, stating that “The culture of life means respect for nature and protection of God’s work of creation. In a special way, it means respect for human life from the first moment of conception until its natural end.”[3]CardinalBernard Law reiterated the theme, urging Americans to “spread the culture of life over the culture of death.

Beyond Holy Scripture, one possible source for this philosophy is the Didache, a first-century Christian document which exposes the doctrine of two ways: the way of life and the way of death. This work is part of the Magisterium of the Catholic Church, and Popes often cite it.

The Pope returned to the theme in April 1995 through the encyclical Evangelium vitae ("Gospel of Life"):

In our present social context, marked by a dramatic struggle between the culture of life and the culture of death, there is need to develop a deep critical sense capable of discerning true values and authentic needs.

Some of the issues that are included in the Catholic Church’s description of the culture of life include:

Opposition to

abortion

Opposition to

human sterilization

(Pope Paul VI,

Humanae vitae

, no. 14)

(CCC no. 2399)

(CCC nos. 2374-2375, 2379)

Opposition to human

cloning

(CCC no. 2378)

Opposition to

contraception

(Pope Paul VI,

Humanae vitae

, nos. 15-18)

Opposition to human

embryonic stem cell

and fetal research, coupled with support for

adult stem cell

research

[4]

Opposition to

euthanasia

(CCC nos. 2276-2279)

Opposition to

murder

and

suicide

(CCC nos. 2268-2269)

(CCC nos. 2280-2283)

Opposition to

capital punishment

(CCC no. 2267)

(St. John Paul II,

Evangelium vitae

, no. 56)

Opposition to

unjust war

(CCC nos. 2307-2317)

Promotion of

agape

love and

charity

[5]

[6]

Promotion of

matrimony

,

maternity

,

fatherhood

,

life

,

chastity

,

fidelity

, and

virtue

[7]

Promotion of

organ donation

(CCC no. 2296)

UNITED STATES POLITICS[]

Following the promulgation of the Pope’s encyclical, advocates of a culture of life founded Culture of Life Foundation and Institute in the United States to promote the concepts behind Evangelium vitae. Pope John Paul II recognized and blessed the foundation in 1997.[8] The “culture of life” entered the mainstream of United States politics on 3 October 2000, during the U.S. presidential election campaign. Texas Governor George W. Bush cited the term during a televised debate against Vice PresidentAl Gore; Bush expressed concerns that Mifepristone, then newly approved as an abortifacient pill, would cause more women to abort their pregnancies, whereas his goal was to make abortions more rare and to “promote a culture of life.” Bush said: