Through Hell - Arthur Young - ebook
Opis

The hero of this hazardous exploration Through Hell is Hiprah Hunt , a lecturer, reformer, ex-preacher, poet and president of a Dante Club. Hiprah Hunt has no tolerance for the modern philosophy that denies the existence of Hell. As a preacher he was what men of the present day call a “back number.” Despite “higher criticism” he continually and earnestly advocates the justice of future punishment , and for this reason is known in the town where he lives as “Hell-fire Hunt.” Not unlikely his belief in a Demon-haunted Hell ruled over by a personal Devil is in part due to atavism, for Mr. Hunt is a descendant of the illustrious Hunts who lent their aid to the extermination of witches in that part of New England where witchcraft once flourished. As President of a Dante Club he collected many books on the subject of future retribution. Among them (some 80 volumes) he chiefly prizes Dante’s Inferno. Whenever he is given an opportunity he will deliver a lecture on Dante and his work. In short, Hell books have so thoroughly absorbed his mind that he becomes convinced that the under-world is as much a reality as the upper one. As a result of continual thinking on one subject, and that subject a hot one, it was frequently hinted that Mr. Hunt’s brains were shrivelling up. Whether that is true or not, he became imbued with the idea that he must find the Infernal Regions and prove to the world that the place is not a myth .

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 34

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS

Arthur Young

Through Hell

UUID: 9396784a-d382-11e8-a34a-17532927e555
This ebook was created with StreetLib Writehttp://write.streetlib.com

Table of contents

READ THIS FIRST.

CANTO I.

CANTO II.

CANTO III.

CANTO IV.

CANTO V.

CANTO VI.

CANTO VII.

CANTO VIII.

CANTO IX.

CANTO X.

CANTO XI.

CANTO XII.

CANTO XIII.

CANTO XIV.

CANTO XV.

CANTO XVI.

CANTO XVII.

CANTO XVIII.

CANTO XIX.

CANTO XX.

CANTO XXI.

CANTO XXII.

CANTO XXIII.

CANTO XXIV.

CANTO XXV.

CANTO XXVI.

CANTO XXVII.

CANTO XXVIII.

CANTO XXIX.

CANTO XXX.

CANTO XXXI.

CANTO XXXII.

CANTO XXXIII.

CANTO XXXIV.

CANTO XXXV.

CANTO XXXVI.

CANTO XXXVII.

CANTO XXXVIII.

CANTO XXXIX.

CANTO XL.

CANTO XLI.

CANTO XLII.

CANTO XLIII.

CANTO XLIV.

CANTO XLV.

CANTO XLVI.

CANTO XLVII.

CANTO XLVIII.

CANTO XLIX.

CANTO L.

CANTO LI.

CANTO LII.

CANTO LIII.

CANTO LIV.

CANTO LV.

CANTO LVI.

CANTO LVII.

CANTO LVIII.

CANTO LIX.

CANTO LX.

CANTO LXI.

CANTO LXII.

CANTO LXIII.

CANTO LXIV.

CANTO LXV.

SATAN.

King of the Infernal Empire, and President of the "Consolidated Penal Industries” of his realm.

A Series of Pictures and Notes of Travel Illustrating theAdventures of a Modern Dante in the Infernal RegionsAlso Other Pictures of the Same Subterranean World

BYARTHUR YOUNG

READ THIS FIRST.

The hero of this hazardous exploration through Hell is Hiprah Hunt, a lecturer, reformer, ex-preacher, poet and president of a Dante Club.

Hiprah Hunt has no tolerance for the modern philosophy that denies the existence of Hell. As a preacher he was what men of the present day call a “back number.”

Despite “higher criticism” he continually and earnestly advocates the justice of future punishment, and for this reason is known in the town where he lives as “Hell-fire Hunt.”

Not unlikely his belief in a Demon-haunted Hell ruled over by a personal Devil is in part due to atavism, for Mr. Hunt is a descendant of the illustrious Hunts who lent their aid to the extermination of witches in that part of New England where witchcraft once flourished.

As President of a Dante Club he collected many books on the subject of future retribution. Among them (some 80 volumes) he chiefly prizes Dante’s Inferno. Whenever he is given an opportunity he will deliver a lecture on Dante and his work. In short, Hell books have so thoroughly absorbed his mind that he becomes convinced that the under-world is as much a reality as the upper one.

As a result of continual thinking on one subject, and that subject a hot one, it was frequently hinted that Mr. Hunt’s brains were shrivelling up. Whether that is true or not, he became imbued with the idea that he must find the Infernal Regions and prove to the world that the place is not a myth.

In the Fall of 1900 Mr. Hunt mysteriously disappeared from home. For six weeks nothing was seen or heard of him. When he returned he set to work immediately and wrote a poem consisting of sixty-eight cantos of blank verse, curiously mixed with prose, quotations and numerous foot-notes. This poem, he declares, is the account of a six weeks’ journey through Hell.

Mr. Hunt’s original manuscript which is in possession of the writer, together with odd charts, maps, diagrams and thermometric records, all of them bearing marks of having come from a very hot region, are strong proofs of the authenticity of his exploration.

Perhaps it is unnecessary to add that the author has taken many liberties with Mr. Hunt’s text. The condition of the documents necessitated certain guess-work, and he has freely added a number of Inferno pictures that were drawn long before Hiprah Hunt’s valuable papers came to his notice.

If he has illuminated the dark and serious subject with a suspicion of fun—it is meant to convey the hope he feels for all sinners like himself, that some relief of a slightly humorous nature may be found even in Hell.

A. Y.