The World of Angels (Malaikah) & Demon (Jinn) In Islam Religion - Muhammad Vandestra - ebook
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In common folklore, angels or malaikah are thought of as good forces of nature, hologram images, or illusions. Western iconography sometimes depicts angels as fat cherubic babies or handsome young men or women with a halo surrounding their head. In Islamic doctrine, they are real created beings who will eventually suffer death, but are generally hidden from our senses.They are not divine or semi-divine, and they are not God’s associates running different districts of the universe. Also, they are not objects to be worshipped or prayed to, as they do not deliver our prayers to God. They all submit to God and carry out His commands.In the Islamic worldview, there are no fallen angels: they are not divided into ‘good’ and ‘evil’ angels. Human beings do not become angels after death. Satan is not a fallen angel, but is one of the jinn (demon), a creation of God parallel to human beings and angels.Angels were created from light before human beings were created, and thus their graphic or symbolic representation in Islamic art is rare. Nevertheless, they are generally beautiful beings with wings as described in Muslim scripture.Angels form different cosmic hierarchies and orders in the sense that they are of different size, status, and merit.The greatest of them is Gabriel. The Prophet of Islam actually saw him in his original form. Also, the attendants of God’s Throne are among the greatest angels. They love the believers and beseech God to forgive them their sins. Throughout history humankind has been attracted to the supernatural. Spirits, ghosts and many other strange creatures have filled our minds and captured our imaginations. Strange and beguiling spectres have at times lead people to commit the greatest of all sins – Shirk. So are these spirits real? Are they more than just figments of our imagination, or shadows moulded from smoke and illusion? Well, according to Muslims they are very real. Spirits, ghosts, banshees, poltergeists and phantoms can all be explained when one understands the Islamic concept of spirits – the world of the Jinn (Demon).The Arabic word Jinn is from the verb ‘Janna’ and means to hide or conceal. The Jinn or Demon are so called because they conceal themselves from people’s sight. The words janeen (foetus) and mijann (shield) come from the same root. Jinn or demon, as the name suggests, are normally invisible to humans. The jinn are part of God’s creation. They were created from fire before the creation of Adam and humankind.And indeed, We created man from dried (sounding) clay of altered mud. And the jinn (Demon), We created aforetime from the smokeless flame of fire (Quran 15:26-27)According to the traditions of Prophet Muhammad the angels were created from light, the jinn from fire and humankind from “what has been described to you”. (meaning clay) God created the angels, jinn and humankind for no other purpose then to worship Him.“I did not create the Jinn and mankind except to worship Me.” (Quran 51:56)Jinn (Demon) exist in our world but they live on their own. Jinn have their own distinct nature and features and they generally remain hidden from humankind. Jinn and humans do have some common traits, the most important of which is free will and with it the ability to choose between good and evil, right and wrong. The jinn eat and drink, they marry, have children and die.

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The World of Angels (Malaikah) & Demon (Jinn) In Islam Religion

By

Muhammad Vandestra

2017

This is a work of fiction. Similarities to real people, places, or events are entirely coincidental.

THE WORLD OF ANGELS (MALAIKAH) & DEMON (JINN) IN ISLAM RELIGION

First edition. September 8, 2017.

Copyright © 2017 Muhammad Vandestra.

ISBN: 978-1370718368

Written by Muhammad Vandestra.

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Table of Contents

Title Page

Copyright Page

Content

Preface

Belief In Angels (Malaikah)

The Number of Angels

The Names of Angels

Angelic Abilities

Tasks of the Angels

The World of Angels (Malaikah)

God Bestowed Might & Power Upon The Angels

The Connections Between Angels & Humankind

The World of Jinn (Demon)

Who Is Satan?

Jinn (Demon) Exist Amongst Us But Apart From Us

Fortunetelling In Islam

Realm of the Jinn (Demon)

The Islamic Ruling on Fortune-telling

Visitation of Fortune-tellers

Belief in Fortune-tellers

Sorcery/Magic From Islamic Perspective

Author Biography

Content

Preface

Belief In Angels (Malaikah)

The World of Angels (Malaikah)

The World of Jinn (Demon)

Fortunetelling In Islam

Sorcery/Magic from Islamic Perspective

Author Biography

Preface

In common folklore, angels or malaikah are thought of as good forces of nature, hologram images, or illusions.  Western iconography sometimes depicts angels as fat cherubic babies or handsome young men or women with a halo surrounding their head.  In Islamic doctrine, they are real created beings who will eventually suffer death, but are generally hidden from our senses.

They are not divine or semi-divine, and they are not God’s associates running different districts of the universe.  Also, they are not objects to be worshipped or prayed to, as they do not deliver our prayers to God.  They all submit to God and carry out His commands.

In the Islamic worldview, there are no fallen angels: they are not divided into ‘good’ and ‘evil’ angels.  Human beings do not become angels after death.  Satan is not a fallen angel, but is one of the jinn (demon), a creation of God parallel to human beings and angels.

Angels were created from light before human beings were created, and thus their graphic or symbolic representation in Islamic art is rare.  Nevertheless, they are generally beautiful beings with wings as described in Muslim scripture.

Angels form different cosmic hierarchies and orders in the sense that they are of different size, status, and merit.

The greatest of them is Gabriel.  The Prophet of Islam actually saw him in his original form.  Also, the attendants of God’s Throne are among the greatest angels.  They love the believers and beseech God to forgive them their sins. 

Throughout history humankind has been attracted to the supernatural.  Spirits, ghosts and many other strange creatures have filled our minds and captured our imaginations.  Strange and beguiling spectres have at times lead people to commit the greatest of all sins – Shirk. So are these spirits real?  Are they more than just figments of our imagination, or shadows moulded from smoke and illusion? Well, according  to Muslims they are very real.   Spirits, ghosts, banshees, poltergeists and phantoms can all be explained when one understands the Islamic concept of spirits – the world of the Jinn (Demon).

Jinn, is a word not completely unheard of by English speakers. Notice the similarity between Jinn and Geni. TV and the movies have all played their part in depicting genies as playful creatures able to fulfill all of humankind’s wishes. The geni in the television series “I Dream of Jeanie” was a young woman who always managed to create playful mischief, and in Disney animated film “Aladdin”, the genie was depicted as loveable rouge. Despite this the jinn are not part of a harmless fairy story; they are very real and can pose a very real threat to humankind.

However God, the Most Wise, has not left us defenceless. He explained the nature of the jinn very clearly. We know their methods and motives because God has revealed these things to us in the Quran and in the traditions of Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him. He has given us the “weapons” to protect ourselves and the means to resist his persuasion. First however, we must be clear about just exactly what jinn are.

The Arabic word Jinn is from the verb ‘Janna’ and means to hide or conceal. The Jinn or Demon are so called because they conceal themselves from people’s sight. The words janeen (foetus) and mijann (shield) come from the same root. Jinn or demon, as the name suggests, are normally invisible to humans. The jinn are part of God’s creation. They were created from fire before the creation of Adam and humankind.

And indeed, We created man from dried (sounding) clay of altered mud. And the jinn (Demon), We created aforetime from the smokeless flame of fire (Quran 15:26-27)

According to the traditions of Prophet Muhammad the angels were created from light, the jinn from fire and humankind from “what has been described to you”. (meaning clay) God created the angels, jinn and humankind for no other purpose then to worship Him.

“I did not create the Jinn and mankind except to worship Me.” (Quran 51:56)

Jinn exist in our world but they live on their own. Jinn have their own distinct nature and features and they generally remain hidden from humankind.  Jinn and humans do have some common traits, the most important of which is free will and with it the ability to choose between good and evil, right and wrong. The jinn eat and drink, they marry, have children and die.

Belief In Angels (Malaikah)

In common folklore, angels or malaikah are thought of as good forces of nature, hologram images, or illusions.  Western iconography sometimes depicts angels as fat cherubic babies or handsome young men or women with a halo surrounding their head.  In Islamic doctrine, they are real created beings who will eventually suffer death, but are generally hidden from our senses.

They are not divine or semi-divine, and they are not God’s associates running different districts of the universe.  Also, they are not objects to be worshipped or prayed to, as they do not deliver our prayers to God.  They all submit to God and carry out His commands.

In the Islamic worldview, there are no fallen angels: they are not divided into ‘good’ and ‘evil’ angels.  Human beings do not become angels after death.  Satan is not a fallen angel, but is one of the jinn (demon), a creation of God parallel to human beings and angels.

Angels were created from light before human beings were created, and thus their graphic or symbolic representation in Islamic art is rare.  Nevertheless, they are generally beautiful beings with wings as described in Muslim scripture.

Angels form different cosmic hierarchies and orders in the sense that they are of different size, status, and merit.

The greatest of them is Gabriel.  The Prophet of Islam actually saw him in his original form.  Also, the attendants of God’s Throne are among the greatest angels.  They love the believers and beseech God to forgive them their sins.  They carry the Throne of God, about whom the Prophet Muhammad, may the mercy and blessings of God be upon him, said:

"I have been given permission to speak about one of the angels of God who carry the Throne.  The distance between his ear-lobes and his shoulders is equivalent to a seven-hundred-year journey." (Abu Daud)

They do not eat or drink.  The angels do not get bored or tired of worshipping God:

"They celebrate His praises night and day, nor do they ever slacken." (Quran 21:20)

The Number of Angels

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