The Way To Wealth - Benjamin Franklin - ebook
Opis

Benjamin Franklin's writings have inspired millions throughout the years, and his advice on how to earn and save money is timeless. "The Way To Wealth" was an essay written by Benjamin Franklin in 1758. He was on a journey to England and resented the time wasted waiting for the ship to sail (it was anchored in New York for 2 weeks) that he began collecting adages and advice from 25 years worth of publication of Poor Richard's Alamanac (Spelled Alamanack at the time). Because the poor man couldn't afford books, he would spend his earnings on yearly almanacs filled with astrology, jokes, stories, and other works of amusement. In Poor Richard's Alamanac, Franklin copied some of the more popular pieces of advice, slightly modified, and also included original works of his own

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The Way To Wealth

Benjamin Franklin

Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

Chapter 4

Introduction

Dr. Franklin, wishing to collect into one piece all the sayings upon the following subjects, which he had dropped in the course of publishing the Almanacks called "Poor Richard," introduces Father Abraham for this purpose. Hence it is, that Poor Richard is so often quoted, and that, in the present title, he is said to be improved. Notwithstanding the stroke of humour in the concluding paragraph of this address, Poor Richard (Saunders) and Father Abraham have proved, in America, that they are no common preachers. And shall we, brother Englishmen, refuse good sense and saving knowledge, because it comes from the other side of the water?

Chapter 1

COURTEOUS READER,

I have heard that nothing gives an author so great pleasure, as to find his works respectfully quoted by others. Judge, then, how much I must have been gratified by an incident I am going to relate to you. I stopped my horse, lately, where a great number of people were collected at an auction of merchants' goods. The hour of the sale not being come, they were conversing on the badness of the times; and one of the company called to a plain, clean, old man, with white locks, 'Pray, Father Abraham, what think you of the times? Will not those heavy taxes quite ruin the country! How shall we be ever able to pay them? What would you advise us to?'——Father Abraham stood up, and replied, 'If you would have my advice, I will give it you in short; "for a word to the wise is enough," as Poor Richard says.' They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and, gathering round him, he proceeded as follows:

'Friends,'