The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare - Bright Summaries - ebook

The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare ebook

Bright Summaries

0,0
22,22 zł

Opis

Unlock the more straightforward side of The Two Gentlemen of Verona with this concise and insightful summary and analysis!

This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare, which explores the problems that can arise when love and friendship come into conflict, and when love is proven to be inconstant. It follows the adventures of the Veronese noblemen Proteus and Valentine, both of whom fall in love with Silvia, the daughter of the Duke of Milan. However, while Valentine’s love is portrayed as genuine, Proteus’s constant deceptions and oath-breaking cast doubt on the sincerity of his emotions – particularly when Julia, the lover he abandoned in Verona, shows up in disguise as a pageboy… The Two Gentlemen of Verona is one of Shakespeare’s lesser-known comedies, and is believed to have been written as early 1589.

Find out everything you need to know about The Two Gentlemen of Verona in a fraction of the time!

This in-depth and informative reading guide brings you:

• A complete plot summary
• Character studies
• Key themes and symbols
• Questions for further reflection

Why choose BrightSummaries.com?

Available in print and digital format, our publications are designed to accompany you on your reading journey. The clear and concise style makes for easy understanding, providing the perfect opportunity to improve your literary knowledge in no time.

See the very best of literature in a whole new light with BrightSummaries.com!

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi lub dowolnej aplikacji obsługującej format:

EPUB

Liczba stron: 21




WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

ENGLISH PLAYWRIGHT AND POET

Born in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1564.Died in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1616.Notable works:Romeo and Juliet (c. 1594), playHamlet (1601), playThe Tempest (1610), play

Hailed as Britain’s greatest dramatist, William Shakespeare wrote and produced around 39 plays, as well as a famous sequence of 154 sonnets and two long narrative poems. He married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children (Susanna, Hamnet, and Judith). As well as a writer, Shakespeare was also an actor and part-owner of his playing company, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men (later the King’s Men). In 1599, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men moved to the purpose-built Globe Theatre, which burned down in an accident involving a theatrical cannon in 1613, before being rebuilt in 1614. Besides providing valuable insight into the Elizabethan and Jacobean times in which he lived and wrote, Shakespeare’s works are often praised as timeless guides to human nature and art that continue to be relevant today.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

THE MISHAPS OF TWO PAIRS OF LOVERS IN ITALY

Genre: playReference edition: Shakespeare, W. (1998) The Two Gentleman of Verona. [Online]. Urbana: Project Gutenberg. [Accessed 18 October 2018]. Available from: <http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1509>1stedition: 1623Themes: love, servitude, constancy, friendship, performance of the self, the power of language

Often thought to be Shakespeare’s earliest play (as it is supposed to have been written around the early 1590s), although not published until the 1623 First Folio edition, The Two Gentlemen of Verona establishes many of the key themes Shakespeare returned to throughout his career as a playwright: the experience of being in love and inconstancy in love, the power of language and art to alter objects, and the nature of life as a performance. This latter theme is embodied in the play by Julia disguising her gender and through the use of a play within the play, a motif Shakespeare returns to in key works such as Hamlet (1603). Although The Two Gentleman of Verona has a reputation as one of Shakespeare’s less frequently performed plays, it has been the subject of a variety of adaptations since it was first written. Defying the conventions of pure comedies or tragedies, the play challenges audiences and readers to reconcile its comic tone and neat resolution with the inconstancies and misdeeds it contains. As a result, it functions as a useful introduction to Shakespeare’s self-awareness of the limits of genre.