Wydawca: Harmakis Edizioni Kategoria: Humanistyka Język: angielski Rok wydania: 2017

Uzyskaj dostęp do tej
i ponad 25000 książek
od 6,99 zł miesięcznie.

Wypróbuj przez
7 dni za darmo

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

e-czytniku kup za 1 zł
tablecie  
smartfonie  
komputerze  
Czytaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Liczba stron: 54

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostępny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacji Legimi na:

Androida
iOS
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?

Ebooka przeczytasz na:

e-czytniku EPUB kup za 1 zł
tablecie EPUB
smartfonie EPUB
komputerze EPUB
Czytaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?

Pobierz fragment dostosowany na:

Zabezpieczenie: watermark

Opis ebooka The Symbolism of the Tarot - Peter D. Ouspensky

Pyotr Demianovich Ouspenskii (known in English as Peter D. Ouspensky,  5 March 1878 – 2 October 1947), was a Russian mathematician and esotericist known for his expositions of the early work of the Greek-Armenian teacher of esoteric doctrine George Gurdjieff, whom he met in Moscow in 1915. He was associated with the ideas and practices originating with Gurdjieff from then on. He shared the (Gurdjieff) "system" for 25 years in England and the United States, having separated from Gurdjieff in 1924 personally, for reasons he explains in the last chapter of his book In Search of the Miraculous.All in all, Ouspensky studied the Gurdjieff system directly under Gurdjieff's own supervision for a period of ten years, from 1915 to 1924. His book In Search of the Miraculous is a recounting of what he learned from Gurdjieff during those years. While lecturing in London in 1924, he announced that he would continue independently the way he had begun in 1921. Some, including his close pupil Rodney Collin, say that he finally gave up the system in 1947, just before his death, but his own recorded words on the subject ("A Record of Meetings", published posthumously) do not clearly endorse this judgement, nor does Ouspensky's emphasis on "you must make a new beginning" after confessing "I've left the system".

Opinie o ebooku The Symbolism of the Tarot - Peter D. Ouspensky

Fragment ebooka The Symbolism of the Tarot - Peter D. Ouspensky

Peter D. Ouspensky

THE SYMBOLISM OF THE TAROT

© Harmakis Edizioni

Division S.E.A. Servizi Editoriali Avanzati,

Registered office in Via Volga 44 - 52025 Montevarchi (AR) ITALY

Headquarters the same aforementioned.

Editorial Director: Paola Agnolucci

www.harmakisedizioni.org - info@harmakisedizioni.org

Novembre 2017

© Layout and graphic processing: Paola Agnolucci

ISBN: 9788885519381
Questo libro è stato realizzato con StreetLib Writehttp://write.streetlib.com

Indice dei contenuti

WHAT IS THE TAROT?

CARD I THE MAGICIAN

CARD O THE FOOL

CARD II THE HIGH PRIESTESS

CARD XXI THE WORLD

CARD III THE EMPRESS

CARD XX JUDGEMENT

CARD IV THE EMPEROR

CARD XIX THE SUN

CARD V THE CHARIOT

CARD XVIII THE MOON

CARD VI THE LOVERS

CARD XVII THE STAR

CARD VII THE HIEROPHANT

CARD XVI THE TOWER

CARD VIII POWER

CARD XV THE DEVIL

CARD IX THE HERMIT

CARD XIV TIME (TEMPERANCE)

​ CARD X THE WHEEL OF CHANCE

CARD XIII DEATH

CARD XI JUSTICE

CARD XII THE HANGED MAN

Peter D. Ouspensky

WHAT IS THE TAROT?

No study of occult philosophy is possible without an acquaintance with symbolism, for if the words occultism and symbolism are correctly used, they mean almost one and the same thing. Symbolism cannot be learned as one learns to build bridges or speak a foreign language, and for the interpretation of symbols a special cast of mind is necessary; in addition to knowledge, special faculties, the power of creative thought and a developed imagination are required. One who understands the use of symbolism in the arts, knows, in a general way, what is meant by occult symbolism. But even then a special training of the mind is necessary, in order to comprehend the 'language of the Initiates', and to express in this language the intuitions as they arise.

There are many methods for developing the 'sense of symbols' in those who are striving to understand the hidden forces of Nature and Man, and for teaching the fundamental principles as well as the elements of the esoteric language. The most synthetic, and one of the most interesting of these methods, is the Tarot.

In its exterior form the Tarot is a pack of cards used in the south of Europe for games and fortune-telling. These cards were first known in Europe at the end of the fourteenth century, when they were in use among the Spanish gypsies.

A pack of Tarot contains the fifty-two ordinary playing cards with the addition of one 'picture card' to every suit, namely, the Knight, placed between the Queen and the Knave. These fifty-six cards are divided into four suits, two black and two red and have the following designation: sceptres (clubs), cups (hearts), swords (spades), and pentacles or disks (diamonds). In addition to the fifty-six cards the pack of Tarot has twenty-two numbered cards with special names:

1. The Magician 13. Death2. The High Priestess14.Temperance3. The Empress15. The Devil4. The Emperor16. The Tower5. The Chariot (7)17. The Star6. The Lovers18.The Moon7. The Heirophant (5)19.The Sun8. Strength20.Judgement9. The Hermit21. The World10. The Wheel of Fortune0. The Fool11.Justice12.The Hanged Man

This pack of cards, in the opinion of many investi-gators, represents the Egyptian hieroglyphic book of seventy-eight tablets, which came to us almost miraculously. The history of the Tarot is a great puzzle.

During the Middle Ages, when it first appeared historically, there existed a tendency to build up synthetic code symbolical or logical systems of the same sort as Ars Magna by Raymond Lully.

But productions similar to the Tarot exist in India and China, so that we cannot possibly think it one of those systems created during the Middle Ages in Europe; it is also evidently connected with the Ancient Mysteries and the Egyptian Initiations. Although its origin is in oblivion and the aim of its author or authors quite unknown, there is no doubt whatever that it is the most complete of Hermetic symbolism we possess.

Although represented as a pack of cards, the Tarot really is something quite different. It can be 'read' in a variety of ways. As one instance, I shall give a metaphysical interpretation of the general meaning or of the general content of the book of Tarot, that is to say, its metaphysical title, which will plainly show that this work could not have been invented by illiterate gypsies of the fourteenth century.

The Tarot falls into three divisions: The first part has twenty-one numbered cards; the second part has one card 0; the third part has fifty-six cards, i. e., the four suits of fourteen cards. Moreover, the second part appears to be a link between the first and third parts, since all the fifty-six cards of the third part together are equal to the card 0.

Now, if we imagine twenty-one cards disposed in the shape of a triangle, seven cards on each side, a point in the centre of the triangle represented by the zero card, and a square round the triangle (the square consisting of fifty-six cards, fourteen on each side), we shall have a representation of the relation between God, Man and the Universe, or the relation between the world of ideas, the consciousness on man and the physical world.

The triangle is God (the Trinity) or the world of ideas, or the noumenal world. The point is man's soul. The square is the visible, physical or phenomenal world. Potentially, the point is equal to the square, which means that all the visible world is contained in man's consciousness, is created in man's soul. And the soul itself is a point having no dimension in the world of the spirit, symbolized by the triangle. It is clear that such an idea could not have originated with ignorant people and clear also that the Tarot is something more than a pack of playing or fortune-telling cards.

H. P. Blavatsky mentions the Tarot in her works, and we have some reason for believing that she studied the Tarot. It is known that she loved to 'play patience'. We do not know what she read in the cards as she played this game, but the author was told

that Madame Blavatsky searched persistently and for a long time for a MSS on the Tarot.