The Suicide Squad - Murder Bund - Emile Tepperman - ebook
Opis

A KEEN October wind was cutting across the Drive from the Hudson when Stephen Klaw came out of the side street. He stopped in the lee of the corner apartment building, and lit a cigarette. He did not at once put out the match, but held it cupped in front of his face so that his clean-cut though rugged features were illuminated. Almost at once, a woman came darting from the shadows of the park across the street. She was dressed in a black rain coat, and wore no hat. Her dark hair streamed out behind her as she ran, in zig-zag fashion, as if wounded. And the great spreading stain of crimson upon the black background of the raincoat, just underneath the heart, testified to the wound. Under her right arm she was clutching a small black leather brief case, which seemed to be more precious to her than the life blood which was pouring from her body.Before she had taken half a dozen steps across the wide expanse of Riverside Drive toward Stephen Klaw, a man's voice rose in a triumphant shout, hoarse and vindictive: "There she is!"The man came tearing out from the park, a little farther down the block. At the same time, two other men broke from cover, at other points along the Drive. They had evidently been combing the park for her. All three of them converged upon her. They had peculiar weapons—the stocks resembled those of Thompson sub-machine guns, but the barrels were sawed-off so that they were only about six inches long.Stephen Klaw's lips pursed tightly when he saw those guns in the hands of the three men. He spat the cigarette from his lips, and thrust his hands down into his jacket pockets. They emerged almost at once, each gripping an automatic...

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 82

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS

THE SUICIDE SQUAD - MURDER BUND

..................

Emile Tepperman

ENDYMION PRESS

Thank you for reading. If you enjoy this book, please leave a review or connect with the author.

All rights reserved. Aside from brief quotations for media coverage and reviews, no part of this book may be reproduced or distributed in any form without the author’s permission. Thank you for supporting authors and a diverse, creative culture by purchasing this book and complying with copyright laws.

Copyright © 2016 by Emile Tepperman

Interior design by Pronoun

Distribution by Pronoun

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. A WOMAN DIES

2. CODE FOR KILLERS

3. ALIASES CAN’T FOOL DEATH

4. BROKEN PROMISE

5. THE LAIR OF TREBIZOND

1. A WOMAN DIES

..................

A KEEN OCTOBER WIND WAS cutting across the Drive from the Hudson when Stephen Klaw came out of the side street. He stopped in the lee of the corner apartment building, and lit a cigarette. He did not at once put out the match, but held it cupped in front of his face so that his clean-cut though rugged features were illuminated.

Almost at once, a woman came darting from the shadows of the park across the street. She was dressed in a black rain coat, and wore no hat. Her dark hair streamed out behind her as she ran, in zig-zag fashion, as if wounded. And the great spreading stain of crimson upon the black background of the raincoat, just underneath the heart, testified to the wound.

Under her right arm she was clutching a small black leather brief case, which seemed to be more precious to her than the life blood which was pouring from her body.

Before she had taken half a dozen steps across the wide expanse of Riverside Drive toward Stephen Klaw, a man’s voice rose in a triumphant shout, hoarse and vindictive: “There she is!”

The man came tearing out from the park, a little farther down the block. At the same time, two other men broke from cover, at other points along the Drive. They had evidently been combing the park for her. All three of them converged upon her. They had peculiar weapons—the stocks resembled those of Thompson sub-machine guns, but the barrels were sawed-off so that they were only about six inches long.

Stephen Klaw’s lips pursed tightly when he saw those guns in the hands of the three men. He spat the cigarette from his lips, and thrust his hands down into his jacket pockets. They emerged almost at once, each gripping an automatic.

The first of those three pursuing men dropped to one knee, and aimed his sawed-off machine gun, while the other two raised their weapons to their shoulders to fire as they ran. All three muzzles were concentrated upon the back of the staggering woman. Either they had not seen the slim, almost boyish figure of Stephen Klaw, or else they did not connect him with their quarry.

Klaw’s eyes were cold and hard as he fired both automatics from the hip. The men on the extreme right and left of the running woman fell as those two automatics began their spiteful, deadly barking. They never even fired their weapons.

But the third, directly behind the woman, was shielded from Klaw by her staggering body.

The fellow saw his advantage at once, and dropped flat on the ground, raising his sawed-off machine gun and pulling the trip at the same time. A burst of scattering lead belched from the mouth of the vicious weapon, spreading over a radius of twenty feet, something like the buckshot from a small gauge shotgun.

Stephen Klaw had anticipated this tactic. There was only one thing he could do, and he did it without reflection or hesitation. Almost before his two automatics had ceased thundering, he launched himself in a flying tackle, straight at the running woman. He reached her a split instant before the sawed-off machine gun belched forth its lead.

Klaw’s shoulder struck the woman’s legs and she fell over him, landing so that his body was between her and the machine-gunner. The spray of lead whistled through the air, just above their heads. The man had fired high, evidently hoping to riddle the woman’s body from the waist up. Only a few of the pellets arced low enough to strike Klaw, and he barely felt them as he fired his right-hand automatic from his prone position on the ground. His slug took the machine-gunner square in the forehead, and the man just relaxed and lay still.

Stephen sprang to one knee and knelt beside the dark-haired woman. She was trying feebly to stir. A moan escaped from her lips. The wound in her breast was bleeding profusely, and though she had escaped the leaden hail from the machine gun, Klaw could see at a glance that she had not long to live. She raised a haggard face to his.

“Did—did they get you—too?”

He put a hand on her shoulder. “No. Only a few little nicks. I’ll be able to pluck them out, easily.”

“Thank... God... you’re safe. I knew... they were looking... for me ... in the park. But I had to... keep the appointment with you. They got me ... with a lucky shot when I escaped with the brief case. I wouldn’t have lasted... much longer...”

“I got the three of them,” Stephen Klaw said grimly. “If that’s any consolation. Now, I’m going to call an ambulance—”

“No, no. I’m... through—done for. Take the brief case. It contains the list... I promised to get for you. All the names of the Executive Council... of... Skull and Swastika Corps!”

Klaw took the black leather case. He did not open it. He bent low over the dying woman.

“You’ve done a great service for your country, Mary Watson—”

“No, no. It’s only... small part. You... must do the... rest. I got all names except the... leader’s. His name was... Franz Trebizond... in Germany. I don’t know... what name he uses in this country. That is for you ... to find...”

The blood was pumping out of her body at an appalling rate. She should have been dead, but she was clinging to life by a terrible effort of naked will power.

“Look out for... Franz Trebizond. He is clever, ruthless—a blond beast without mercy or heart. And watch for the woman, Lisa Monterey. She is ... bad as he...”

Mary Watson gasped, and a spasm went through her body. But she held on to life for another moment, with a grim purposeful effort.

“You must promise me... one thing more...”

“Anything you ask,” Steve said.

“Promise to look after my daughter, Sue. They—the Skull and Swastika Corps—will try to hurt her because of what I did to them.” She shuddered, and pressed a hand against her breast as if to stem the tide of spilling blood for one instant more. “I—I can’t bear to think of Sue in the hands of those monsters. They... know dreadful tortures... they know where to find every living nerve in a girl’s body. They would keep her in agony for days and days—”

“No, they won’t,” Stephen Klaw said grimly. He took a deep breath. “I give you my word, Mary Watson,” he said solemnly, “and I give you the word of Kerrigan and Murdoch too. The three of us will see to it that nothing happens to Sue Watson—while we’re alive!”

A look of ineffable happiness came into the swiftly-dimming eyes of Mary Watson, erasing the mask of pain from her features. Her body relaxed, giving way at last to the sweet, blank nothingness of death.

She lay still....

2. CODE FOR KILLERS

..................

STEPHEN KLAW PUT A FINGER upon the artery in her throat. There was no pulse, no life. Slowly, he picked up the brief case, and rose to his feet. As he looked down upon the still body of Mary Watson, there was a tight gray bleakness in his face, which had not been there before.

Sounds arose about him, in the quiet night air. Fifty heads were poked out of apartment house windows, and voices called out in fright and in execration.

“There’s the murderer... He killed the woman... It’s the Skull and Swastika again—I recognize those machine guns! Call the police! Catch him! Catch the murderer!”

Men were running out of the corner house, others were coming from up and down the street. From a ground floor window a man’s voice came clearly, high- pitched and keen: “Operator! Operator! Get police headquarters! It’s a killing! The Skull and Swastika...”

Stephen Klaw paid no attention to the shouts, to the people who stared out of the window, or to those who were in the street. His lips moved faintly as he stood over the body of the dark-haired woman.

“I don’t like leaving you here, Mary Watson, dead in the gutter. But you were a brave woman. You would understand.”

Instinctively, his right hand, holding the still-hot automatic, rose to his forehead in mute salute. Then, with the brief-case under his left arm, and an automatic in each hand, he turned and strode away down the same side-street from which he had come. He looked neither to the right nor to the left, walking as if all those shouting, gesticulating, threatening people did not even exist.

They kept their distance, too, for the sight of those dead bodies on the ground, and of the automatics in his hands, was enough to deter the boldest of them from attempting to stop him.

But they yelled and they screamed, and they blasphemed against him.

“Dammed Nazi,” he heard. And, “He’s a Skull and Swastika gunman. Get the yellow rat!”