The Stag Cook Book - Carroll Mac Sheridan - ebook
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It includes favorite recipes from notable American men including Indiana author, politician and diplomat Meredith Nicholson. I wanted to find out a bit more about the book and consequently discovered The New York Herald’s Books and Magazine section on Nov. 5, 1922 carried a review of “The Stag Cook Book” entitled “Justifiable Homicide.” While the title of the review refers more to the introductory pages than to the recipes, the reader is left to question if the book is meant for humor or for serious cookery. 

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Table of contents

CONTENTS

RADISH SALAD

WAFFLES

Ushka

A FAVORITE MENU

SPAGHETTI-MY-STYLE

CONTENTS

The Stag Cook Book

The Stag Cook BookC. MAC SHERIDAN
THE STAG COOK BOOK
WRITTEN FOR MEN BY MEN COLLECTED AND EDITED byC. MAC SHERIDANWith an Introduction by ROBERT H. DAVIS

NEW YORK GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, 1922, BY GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY THE STAG COOK BOOK, II ——— PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dedicated To— THAT GREAT HOST OF BACHELORS AND BENEDICTS ALIKE

who have at one time or another tried to “cook something”; and who, in the attempt, have weakened under a fire of feminine raillery and sarcasm, only to spoil what, under more favorable circumstances, would have proved a chef-d’œuvre.
“They may live without houses and live without books,”
So the saying has gone through the ages,
“But a civilized man cannot live without cooks—”
It’s a libel, as proved by these pages!
For when left by himself in a small kitchenette,
With a saucepan, a spoon and a kettle,
A man can make things that you’ll never forget—
That will put any cook on her mettle.
Where camp fires glow through the still of the night,
Where grills are electric and shiny,
Where kitchens are huge, done in tiling of white,
Where stoves are exceedingly tiny,
Where people are hungry—no matter the place—
A man can produce in a minute
A dish to bring smiles to each skeptical face,
With art—and real food value—in it!
At range and at oven, at (whisper it!) still,
A man is undoubtedly master;
His cooking is done with an air and a skill,
He’s sure as a woman—and faster!
He may break the dishes and clutter the floor,
And if he is praised—he deserves it—
He may flaunt his prowess until he’s a bore. . . .
But, Boy, what he serves—when he serves it!

[viii][ix]

INTRODUCTION By Robert H. Davis

Cooking is a gift, not an art. Eating is an art, not a gift. In combination a grace is developed. No great culinary triumph was ever perfected by accident.

Charles Lamb’s essay on roast pig was responsible for a tidal wave of burnt pork that swept over England in the nineteenth century. Mr. Lamb led a hungry empire to the belief that only through an act of incendiarism could a suckling porker be converted into a delicacy; whereas, as a matter of fact, the perfection of roast pork, golden-brown and unseared by fire, were possible only in the oven.

Lucullus, the good Roman gourmet, had his meals cooked in a mint. He required that his masterpieces be served on gold and silver and crystal, and spread on a table of lapis lazuli. The sauces compiled for him were worth more than the food upon which they were poured. He was the high priest of extravagance and luxury. A single meal stood him a fortune. He had more regard for the cost than for the cooking. It is said that his death was hastened by dyspepsia.

In the early seventies a French nobleman, living in the neighborhood of Barbizon, was found seated at the table with his face in a plate of soup. Because of the fact that a butcher knife had been inserted via the back between his fourth and fifth rib on the left side, he was quite dead. Clues led nowhere. It became one of the mysteries.

Long afterward an old man tottered into the office of the Prefect and announced that he wished to make a confession.

“Proceed,” said the official.

“’Twas I,” responded the ancient, “who delivered the death stroke to the Duke de la —— thirty-five years ago.”

“What inspired you to make this confession?”

“Pride.”

“I do not comprehend. The details, if you please.”

“By profession I was a chef,” said the self-accused. “The Duke, at a fabulous price, enticed me into his service. His first request was that I make for him a perfect consomme. Voilà! For three days I prepared this perfection. With my own hand I placed before him the soup tureen. With my own hand I ladled it out. He inhaled its divine essence; and then, Your Honor, he reached for the salt. Mon Dieu! I destroy him!”

The Prefect embraced the artist and took him out to lunch. Thus art was vindicated and the incident closed. In the chemistry of cooking, “enough is too much.”

The immortals who have contributed recipes to this volume were born with a silver spoon not in their mouths, but in their hands. The cap and apron, not the cap and bells, is the garb in which they perform. Secrets handed down through generations are thrown with a wanton hand on the pages that comprise this volume. Sauces from the south, chowders from New England, barbecued masterpieces from the west, grilled classics from field and stream, ragouts, stews, desserts, dressings are hung within reach of all, like garlic clusters from the rafters of opportunity. Reach up and help yourself.

Be not disturbed by occasional jocund phrases in this symposium. Behind them is probably concealed a savory or a flavor. A long paragraph may conclude with full particulars concerning the architecture of a gastronomic dream. Turn the pages slowly lest you be overwhelmed by the richness of the menu.

The late King Edward, upon bidding the later Carlos of Portugal God-speed back to his native shores, inquired: “By what were you most impressed during your visit to the British Isles?”

“Roast beef,” said Carlos, expanding in ecstasy.

“And what else?” inquired Edward.

“Well,” said Carlos, “the boiled beef wasn’t so damned bad.”

It is one thing to cook food, and another to consume it. This inspired tome is the product of cooks who are not afraid to take their own medicine. The names of many of the dishes catalogued herein lies on the tongues of the mob, but the delicacies themselves do not. This book brings within the reach of all opportunities that up to now have been denied them. Given a first class stove, a few simple ingredients and a copy of this book, hunger can be abolished wherever English is read.

Rossini, the musician, also a chef, after writing the score of The Barber of Seville, was informed by the director that a prelude was required immediately. Rossini repaired to his kitchen, cooked himself a perfect dinner, consumed it alone, and went to bed where in a reclining position with score sheets all about him, he wrote a brilliant introduction to his brilliant opera. Suddenly a gust of wind entered unbidden at the window and scattered the precious sheets about the room. Several disappeared through the lattice. Rossini, heavy with the consequences of his culinary genius, re-wrote a fresher and better prelude, tucked it under his corpulent person and rolled over for a final nap, after which he hastened to the opera house with his masterpiece. His best work was done on a full stomach.

Brillat-Savarin, author of “Gastronomy as a Fine Art,” rather whimsically names “Gasteria” the tenth and fairest of the Muses. The writers of this book name her as the first.

R. H. D.

PART ONE: CONTRIBUTORSPAGEI Meredith Nicholson31WABASH VALLEY STEAKII Rex Beach34ONION CLAM CHOWDERIII Hudson Maxim35SPAGHETTIIV Warren G. Harding36WAFFLESV Ellis Parker Butler31BOUILLABAISSE JOE TILDENVI Jules J. Jusserand38RADISH SALADVII Bruce Barton39RICE PUDDINGVIII Richard Bennett40LIEDERKRANZ Á LA HOOSIERIX Walt Louderback41CORN CHOWDERX Captain Robert A. Bartlett, U.S.A.42COD FISHXI George F. Worts43SWEET POTATO PONEXII Gelett Burgess45PANDOWDYXIII William Allen White46VEGETABLE SALADXIV Irvin S. Cobb48HOG JOWL AND TURNIP GREENS (PADUCAH STYLE)XV Richard Walton Tully49HAWAIIAN CROQUETTES Á LA “THE BIRD OF PARADISE”XVI William Johnston51OYSTERS PECHEURXVII Dr. Charles M. Sheldon52LIKES BREAD AND MILKXVIII James Montgomery Flagg53“JAMES MONTGOMERY SUDS”XIX Roy L. McCardell54“EGGS MUSHROOMETTE”XX Judge Ben B. Lindsey56BRAN MUFFINSXXI Otis Skinner57ARTICHOKES, MISTER ANTONIOXXII Dan Beard58A BURGOOXXIII De Wolf Hopper60RASPBERRY SHORTCAKEXXIV Chick Evans61TOMATO SOUPXXV Joshua A. Hatfield63EGGPLANT SAUTÉ Á L’ALEXANDERPOTATO STICKS ALEXANDERCOLD SAUCE ALEXANDERSUPRÊME OF CHICKEN Á L’ALEXANDERGARNITUREFONDU AU FROMAGE Á L’ALEXANDERPOACHED EGGS EN CROUSTADE Á L’ALEXANDERROMAINE SALAD Á L’ALEXANDERROGNONS DE VEAU Á L’ALEXANDERSTRAWBERRY TARTLETS ALEXANDERBAKED OYSTERS ALEXANDERÉMINCE OF CHICKEN Á L’ALEXANDERXXVI Stewart Edward White69MULLIGANXXVII Oliver Herford70FRIED ELDERBERRY BLOSSOMSXXVIII Reed Smoot71PEACH COBBLERXXIX Ray Long72SHAD ROEDESSERTXXX Kenneth C. Beaton73LOBSTERXXXI John Harvey Kellogg, M. D.75MACARONI WITH CHEESESAVORY POTATOESXXXII Clare Briggs77WAFFLESXXXIII Edward W. Bok78ASPARAGUSXXXIV Charles Hanson Towne80CORN PUDDINGXXXV Jerome D. Kern81TERRAPINXXXVI Daniel Willard82COTTAGE PUDDINGSTRAWBERRY SAUCEXXXVII Houdini83SCALLOPED MUSHROOMS AND DEVILED EGGSTHE MUSHROOM DISHTHE EGGSXXXVIII Charles P. Steinmetz84MEAT LOAFXXXIX Charlie Chaplin86STEAK AND KIDNEY PIEXL Dr. Frank Crane87ROUND STEAKXLI Robert H. Davis89CREAM SAUCE Á LA WORCESTERSHIREXLII John A. Dix90FRIED TROUTXLIII Guy Bates Post91LAMB CURRY Á LA “OMAR, THE TENTMAKER”XLIV Dr. Don Rafael H. Elizalde93SANCOCHOYAPINGACHOXLV Bide Dudley95TOMATO SOPXLVI William Hale Thompson96ROAST BEEFXLVII Booth Tarkington97CORN FLAKESXLVIII T. A. Dorgan98CHILÏ CON CARNEXLIX William de Leftwich Dodge99RAGOUT DE MOUTONL Montague Glass100BOUILLABAISSELI John Philip Sousa103PELOTAS Á LA PORTUGUESESPAGHETTILII Will Hays105CHICKEN PILAULIII Frank Ward O’Malley106RUM-TUM-TIDDYLIV Charles Evans Hughes108CORN BREADLV Walter Prichard Eaton109MINCE PIETHE FILLINGLVI W. T. Benda113POLISH SPECIALTIESBARSHCK WITH USHKAUSHKABURACHKILVII Captain Edward A. Salisbury118SAUCE FOR SPAGHETTIEGGS Á LA SALISBURYFISH Á LA COMMODORETO COOK TROUTVENISON STEAKGOOSEA MAYONNAISE AND A SALAD DRESSINGDUCKS AND LARGE FOWLTEAL, PARTRIDGE AND SMALL FOWLBEANSITALIAN RICESTEAK SAUCELVIII Thomas H. Ince126CHICKEN HALIBUTONION SOUP AU GRATINRICE Á LA MANHATTANLIX George Ade128“SCOLLOPED” OYSTERSLX Lyman Abbott130DEEP APPLE PIELXI Terry Ramsaye131LETTUCE (Á LA RED CREEK)LXII R. L. (Rube) Goldberg133HASHLXIII Channing Pollock134CORN BREADLXIV Hussein Kahn Alai135CHIRIN POLOWLXV William J. Bryan138FRENCH-FRIED ONIONSLXVI Will Irwin139HAM AND EGGSLXVII Douglas Fairbanks140BREAD TARTLXVIII Julian Street141SOLE Á LA MARGUERY AND DUCK WITH ORANGESSOLE Á LA MARGUERYDUCK BIGARADELXIX S. S. McClure143OMELETTE—AND PIELXX Basil King145LOBSTER Á LA KINGLXXI John A. Moroso146SPAGHETTI-FOR-THE-GANGLXXII F. X. Leyendecker148VEAU SAUTÉ MARENGOVOL AU VENT FINANCIÉRELXXIII Eddie Cantor150BOILED BEEF AND HORSERADISH SAUCELXXIV Frazier Hunt151STUFFED CELERYLXXV Wm. Slavins McNutt152ORANGE COMPOTELXXVI Stephen Vincent Benet154ZITELLI’S MACARONI STEWLXXVII James R. Quirk155TOMATO WIGGLELXXVIII Charles W. Eliot156A FAVORITE MENULXXIX H. S. Cumming158VIRGINIA EGG BREADLXXX Joseph Santley159COCOA CREAM CAKELXXXI A. Hamilton Gibbs160SQUAB EN CASSEROLELXXXII Richard Barthelmess161SPICED GRAPESLXXXIII Don Juan R. y Gayangos162EGG PLANT AU GRATINLXXXIV Samuel G. Blythe163TRIPE Á LA MODE DE CAEN Á LA ROY CARRUTHERSLXXXV Charles H. Taylor165CLAM CHOWDERLXXXVI Cyrus H. K. Curtis167BAKED BEANSLXXXVII Frederic Arnold Kummer169SPAGHETTI DIABOLIQUELXXXVIII Albert D. Lasker170CHICKEN PAPRIKALXXXIX Henry Van Dyke171FISH CHOWDERXC Macklyn Arbuckle172SOUTHERN GUMBO Á LA “COUNTY CHAIRMAN”XCI John Taintor Foote174MORELS SAUTÉXCII Maurice Francis Egan176A DIPLOMATIST’S RECEIPT FOR WELSH RABBITXCIII Livingston Farrand178SAUSAGE AND GRIDDLE CAKESXCIV F. Ziegfeld, Jr.179LITTLE CHICKEN TARTSXCV Harold Lloyd181LEMON LAYER CAKEXCVI Luther Burbank183TURKEY Á LA BURBANKXCVII Raymond McKee185TO COOK RABBITSXCVIII Will Deming187VIRGINIA HAMLEMON PIEA DRESSINGXCIX Charles W. Chessar189TIPS ON STEAKSC Arthur T. Vance191SALADE Á LA TURCPANDORA FRENCH DRESSINGWELSH RABBIT Á LA MORGAN ROBERTSONCI Baron de Cartier195WATERZOIE DE VOLAILLECII Dean Cornwell197SPAGHETTI-MY-STYLE

RADISH SALAD

PART TWO: RECIPESBreads—Muffins—Waffles—Etc.BRAN MUFFINS56BREAD AND MILK52CORN BREAD108, 134CORNFLAKES97GRIDDLE CAKES178SWEET POTATO PONE43VIRGINIA EGG BREAD158WAFFLES36, 77Egg DishesDEVILED EGGS83EGGS Á LA SALISBURY119EGGS “MUSHROOMETTE”54EGGS USED WITH ASPARAGUS79HAM AND EGGS139OMELETTE143POACHED EGGS EN CROUSTADE A L’ALEXANDER65Soups—Mulligans—BouillabaisseBARSHCK113BARSHCK WITH USHKA113BEAN SOUP124BURGOO, A58BOUILLABAISSE JOE TILDEN37BOUILLABAISSE100CORN CHOWDER41CLAM CHOWDER165FISH CHOWDER171MULLIGAN69ONION CLAM CHOWDER34ONION SOUP AU GRATIN126SANCOCHO93TOMATO SOUP61WATERZOIE DE VOLAILLE195Fish—Oysters—Lobster—Roe—Etc.BAKED OYSTERS ALEXANDER67CHICKEN HALIBUT126COD FISH42COLD SAUCE ALEXANDER (FOR COLD SALMON)64FISH Á LA COMMODORE119FRIED TROUT90HAWAIIAN CROQUETTES Á LA BIRD OF PARADISE49LOBSTER Á LA KING145LOBSTER (K C B)73OYSTERS PECHEUR51“SCOLLOPED” OYSTERS128SHAD ROE72SOLE Á LA MARGUERY141STEAMED CLAMS97TROUT, TO COOK120Fowl (Domestic and Wild)CHICKEN PAPRIKA170CHICKEN PILAU105CHIRIN POLOW (PERSIAN)135DUCK BIGARADE142DUCKS AND LARGE FOWL122ÉMINCE OF CHICKEN Á L’ALEXANDER68GOOSE, THE BEST WAY TO COOK121LITTLE CHICKEN TARTS179SOUTHERN GUMBO Á LA “COUNTY CHAIRMAN”172SQUAB EN CASSEROLE160SUPRÊME OF CHICKEN Á L’ALEXANDER64SUPRÊME OF CHICKEN Á L’ALEXANDER GARNITURE65TEAL, PARTRIDGE AND SMALL FOWL123TURKEY Á LA BURBANK183Meats—Meat Dishes and SaucesCHILI CON CARNE98CREAM SAUCE Á LA WORCESTERSHIRE89HASH—A NEW METHOD133HAM AND EGGS139HOG JOWL AND TURNIP GREENS48HORSERADISH SAUCE150LAMB CURRY Á LA “OMAR THE TENT MAKER”91MEAT LOAF84PELOTAS Á LA PORTUGUESE103RABBIT, TO COOK185RAGOUT DE MOUTON99ROAST BEEF, TIPS ON COOKING96ROGNONS DE VEAU Á L’ALEXANDER66ROUND STEAK—REALLY DELICIOUS87SANCOCHO (FROM ECUADOR)93SPICED GRAPES161STEAK AND KIDNEY PIE86STEAK SAUCE125STEAK, TIPS ON189TERRAPIN81TRIPE Á LA MODE DE CAEN163USHKA (POLISH)114VEAU SAUTÉ MARENGO148VOL AU VENT FINANCIÈRE149VENISON STEAK120VIRGINIA HAM31WABASH VALLEY STEAK187Vegetables and the LikeARTICHOKES MISTER ANTONIO57ASPARAGUS78BEANS (VARIOUS STYLES)123, 167BURACHKI (POLISH)117EGGPLANT AU GRATIN162EGGPLANT SAUTÉ Á L’ALEXANDER63FRENCH FRIED ONIONS138ITALIAN RICE124MORELS SAUTÉ174POTATO STICKS ALEXANDER63RICE Á LA MANHATTAN127SAVORY POTATOES75“SCOLLOPED” MUSHROOMS83TOMATO SOP95TURNIP GREENS48YAPINGACHO (FROM ECUADOR)94Spaghetti—Macaroni—Etc.MACARONI STEW, ZITELLI’S154MACARONI WITH CHEESE75SPAGHETTI35SPAGHETTI DIABOLIQUE169SPAGHETTI FOR-THE-GANG146SPAGHETTI-MY-STYLE197SPAGHETTI SAUCES118, 146, 154SPAGHETTI WITH PELOTAS103Salads and Salad DressingsDRESSING (FOR STUFFED TOMATOES, COLD MEAT, POTATO SALAD)188LETTUCE Á LA RED CREEK131A MAYONNAISE AND A SALAD DRESSING122PANDORA FRENCH DRESSING192RADISH SALAD38ROMAINE SALAD Á L’ALEXANDER66SALADE Á LA TURC191VEGETABLE SALAD