The Google Story - PCC - ebook
Opis

The definitive, bestselling account of the company that changed the way we work and live, updated for the twentieth anniversary of Google’s founding with analysis of its most recent bold moves to redefine the world—and its even more ambitious plans for the future. Moscow-born Sergey Brin and Midwest-born Larry Page dropped out of graduate school at Stanford University to, as they said, “change the world” through a powerful search engine that would organize every bit of information on the Web for free. The Google Story takes you deep inside the company’s wild ride from an idea that struggled for funding in 1998 to a firm that today rakes in billions in profits. Based on scrupulous research and extraordinary access to Google, this fast-moving narrative reveals how an unorthodox management style and a culture of innovation enabled a search-engine giant to shake up Madison Avenue, clash with governments that accuse it of being a monopoly, deploy self-driving cars to forever change how we travel, and launch high-flying Internet balloons. Unafraid of controversy, Google is surging ahead with artificial intelligence that could cure diseases but also displace millions of people from their jobs, testing the founders’ guiding mantra: DON’T BE EVIL. Praise for The Google Story “[The authors] do a fine job of recounting Google’s rapid rise and explaining its search business.”—The New York Times “An intriguing insider view of the Google culture.”—Harvard Business Review “An interesting read on a powerhouse company . . . If you haven’t read anything about one of today’s most influential companies, you should. If you don’t read The Google Story, you’re missing a few extra treats.”—USA Today “Fascinating . . . meticulous . . . never bogs down.”—Houston Chronicle

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 41

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS

The Genesis of a Great Idea

Key Thoughts

“Not since Gutenberg invented the modern printing press more than 500 years ago, making books and scientific tomes affordable and widely available to the masses, has any new invention empowered individuals, and transformed access to information, as profoundly as Google. With its colorful, childlike logo set against a background of pure white, Google's magical ability to produce speedy, relevant responses to queries hundreds of millions times daily has changed the way people find information and stay abreast of the news. Woven into the fabric of daily life, Google has seemingly overnight become indispensable. Millions of people use it daily in more than 100 languages and have come to regard Google and the Internet as one. The quest for immediate information on anything and everything is satisfied by ‘googling' it on a computer or cell phone. Men, women and children have come to rely so heavily on Google that they cannot imagine how they ever lived without it.”

David Vise and Mark Malseed

Strange as it may sound considering the fact that Google is today worth more than Disney and General Motors combined, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the two young co-founders of Google never actually set out to change the world. When the company was founded in 1998, it didn't even have a business plan or a definitive business strategy. Instead, all Brin and Page had was an intense desire to do something innovative and to create a workplace where the best and brightest people could do some fun stuff.

Sergey Brin was born in Moscow, Russia on August 21, 1973. At age six, his parents emigrated from Russia to America to escape anti-Semitism and in search of greater freedom and opportunities. Sergey's parents are both highly educated. His mother is now an accomplished scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center while his father teaches math at the University of Maryland. As a result, a good education is highly valued in the Brim household. Sergey received an undergraduate degree from the University of Maryland at age 19 with honors in math and computer science. He was then awarded a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship and enrolled in the doctoral program at Stanford University.

Larry Page was born in Michigan on March 26, 1973. His father Carl had received one of the first computer science degrees ever awarded by the University of Michigan, so Larry grew up using computers all his life. His mother had a master's degree in computer science and worked as a database consultant. Both his parents taught at Michigan State University although they divorced when Larry was eight years old. Larry graduated from the University of Michigan in 1995 majoring in computer engineering and was also accepted into Stanford University's doctoral program.

Larry Page and Sergey Brin met for the first time in 1995 when Sergey was running a new student orientation program at Stanford. They hit it off right away, mainly because both of them liked to argue about anything and everything. Page and Brin considered each other to be obnoxious but an intellectually worthy adversary. Soon, they were sparring verbally about every subject imaginable. Sergey was louder and more extroverted while Larry tended to be quieter and more introspective, but their intellectual dueling laid the foundation for what would ultimately become a lasting friendship.

Since both Page and Brin were the sons of professors, they had always just naturally assumed they too would stay in academia for the balance of their careers. Brin's advisor, Professor Motwani, suggested a good subject for a doctoral thesis would be to look at finding new ways to extract meaningful information from large mountains of data. In the mid-1990s, it was very difficult to find information on the Internet, which resembled a virtual Wild West in many ways—unregulated, unorganized and unruly. This was the era of the first generation search engines like WebCrawler, Lycos, Magellan, Info seek, Excite and HotBot. In response to this need, two other Stanford doctoral candidates, Jerry Yang and David Filo, had started assembling an alphabetized directory assembled by human editors, which would eventually become Yahoo! Motwani suggested to Brin that there might be a smarter and better way to get the job done.

Key Thoughts

“At the same time, Page began hunting around the Web using a new search engine called AltaVista. While it returned somewhat better and faster results than the other search engines, Page noticed something else entirely. In addition to a list of websites, AltaVista's search results included seemingly obscure information about something called‘links. 'Links contributed to the Web's dynamism; computer users seeing a highlighted word or phrase could click on that link if they wanted to learn more, and they would instantly be taken to another webpage. Instead of focusing on AltaVista's main search results, Page began pondering what could be gleaned from analyzing the links.”

David Vise and Mark Malseed