THE FROG PRINCE and other children's stories - Anon E. Mouse - ebook
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THE FROG PRINCE and Other Stories is three children’s stories for the price of one. This book was published after a series of 17 colour illustrations by Walter Crane was put on public display. They are recreated for you in this book with the stories in their original form.THE FROG PRINCE; is an excellent story to teach children the importance of keeping their promises no matter how distasteful they may seem. It also teaches the moral of “Every Cloud has a Silver Lining”.In the tale, a spoiled princess reluctantly befriends the Frog Prince whom she met after dropping a gold ball into a pond. The princess makes a promise she does not intend to keep. The frog visits the Princess in her father’s palace and holds her to account. The King, the Princesses’ father, an honourable man, insists the princess keep her promise. Reluctantly she does and the frog magically transforms into a handsome prince.PRINCESS BELLE-ETOILE is a French literary fairy tale written by Madame d'Aulnoy. A queen, reduced to poverty, started selling sauces to support herself and her three daughters. One day, an old woman came to them and begged a meal. They fed her, and the woman, being a fairy, promised that the next time they wished something without thinking of her, it would come true. For a long time, they could not make a wish without thinking of her. One day, the king came by. The oldest daughter, Roussette, said that if she married the king's admiral, she would make sails for all his ships; the 2nd, Brunette, that if she married the king's brother, she would make him lace enough to fill a castle; the 3rd, Blondine, that if she married the king, she would bear him two sons and a daughter, who would have golden chains about their necks and stars on their foreheads, and jewels would fall from their hair.A favourite of the King repeated their words to him, who summoned the sisters, and soon they were married. A splendid wedding feast was laid on, served on golden dishes. But that’s not where the story ends………….ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP is a well-known Middle Eastern folk tale and was a late addition to “1001 Arabian Nights.”Aladdin is an impoverished youth dwelling in a city in China. He is recruited by a sorcerer from the Maghreb (Sahara), He convinced Aladdin and his mother of his good will by pretending to set up the lad as a merchant. The sorcerer's motive is to persuade young Aladdin to retrieve a wonderful oil lamp from a booby-trapped cave. The sorcerer double-crosses him, and Aladdin finds himself trapped in the cave. Aladdin manages to escape with the lamp and return to his mother. When his mother tries to clean the lamp, so they can sell it, a second far more powerful genie appears who is bound to do their bidding.With the aid of the genie, Aladdin becomes rich and powerful and marries the sultan's daughter, after magically foiling her marriage to the vizier's son. The genie builds Aladdin and his bride a wonderful palace, far more magnificent than the sultan's. But that’s not the end of the story – is it?You’ll have to download these three tales to find out just how these stories end.

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The Frog Prince

and other illustrated stories

By

Walter Crane

The Frog Prince

Princess Belle-Etoile

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp

Originally published by

George Routledge

[1874]

Resurrected by

Abela Publishing, London

[2017]

The Frog Prince

and other illustrated stories

Typographical arrangement of this edition

© Abela Publishing 2017

This book may not be reproduced in its current format in any manner in any media, or transmitted by any means whatsoever, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical ( including photocopy, file or video recording, internet web sites, blogs, wikis, or any other information storage and retrieval system) except as permitted by law without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Abela Publishing,

London

United Kingdom

2017

ISBN-13: 978-X-XXXXXX-XX-X

Email

[email protected]

Website

www.AbelaPublishing.com

Acknowledgements

Abela Publishing acknowledges the work that

Walter Crane

did in a time before well before electronic media was in use.

Contents

The Frog Prince

Princess Belle-Etoile

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp

THE FROG PRINCE.

IN the olden time, when wishing was having, there lived a King, whose daughters were all beautiful; but the youngest was so exceedingly beautiful that the Sun himself, although he saw her very often, was enchanted every time she came out into the sunshine.

Near the castle of this King was a large and gloomy forest, and in the midst stood an old lime-tree, beneath whose branches splashed a little fountain; so, whenever it was very hot, the King's youngest daughter ran off into this wood, and sat down by the side of this fountain; and, when she felt dull, would often divert herself by throwing a golden ball up in the air and catching it. And this was her favourite amusement.

Now, one day it happened, that this golden ball, when the King's daughter threw it into the air, did not fall down into her hand, but on the grass; and then it rolled past her into the fountain. The King's daughter followed the ball with her eyes, but it disappeared beneath the water, which was so deep that no one could see to the bottom. Then she began to lament, and to cry louder and louder; and, as she cried, a voice called out, "Why weepest thou, O King's daughter? thy tears would melt even a stone to pity." And she looked around to the spot whence the voice came, and saw a Frog stretching his thick ugly head out of the water. "Ah! you old water-paddler," said she, "was it you that spoke? I am weeping for my golden ball, which has slipped away from me into the water."

"Be quiet, and do not cry," answered the Frog; "I can give thee good advice. But what wilt thou give me if I fetch thy plaything up again?"

"What will you have, dear Frog?" said she. "My dresses, my pearls and jewels, or the golden crown which I wear?"

The Frog answered, "Dresses, or jewels, or golden crowns, are not for me; but if thou wilt love me, and let me be thy companion and playfellow, and sit at thy table, and eat from thy little golden plate, and drink out of thy cup, and sleep in thy little bed,—if thou wilt promise me all these, then will I dive down and fetch up thy golden ball."

"Oh, I will promise you all," said she, "if you will only get me my ball." But she thought to herself, "What is the silly Frog chattering about? Let him remain in the water with his equals; he cannot mix in society." But the Frog, as soon as he had received her promise, drew his head under the water and dived down. Presently he swam up again with the ball in his mouth, and threw it on the grass. The King's daughter was full of joy when she again saw her beautiful plaything; and, taking it up, she ran off immediately. "Stop! stop!" cried the Frog; "take me with thee. I cannot run as thou canst."