The Complete Works of William Shakespeare - William Shakespeare - ebook
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William Shakespeare was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet, and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

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The complete works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

 

 

First digital edition 2017 by Anna Ruggieri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTENTS

The complete works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

SCENE: Rousillon; Paris; Florence; Marseilles - ACT I. SCENE 1. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT I. SCENE 2. Paris. The KING'S palace

ACT I. SCENE 3. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 1. Paris. The KING'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 2. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 3. Paris. The KING'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 4. Paris. The KING'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 5. Paris. The KING'S palace

ACT III. SCENE 1. Florence. The DUKE's palace

ACT III. SCENE 2. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT III. SCENE 3. Florence. Before the DUKE's palace

ACT III. SCENE 4. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT III. SCENE 5.

ACT III. SCENE 6. Camp before Florence

ACT III. SCENE 7. Florence. The WIDOW'S house

ACT IV. SCENE 1. Without the Florentine camp

ACT IV.SCENE 2. Florence. The WIDOW'S house

ACT IV. SCENE 3. The Florentine camp

ACT IV SCENE 4. The WIDOW'S house

ACT IV SCENE 5. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT V. SCENE 1. Marseilles. A street

ACT V SCENE 2. Rousillon. The inner court of the COUNT'S palace

ACT V SCENE 3. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

DRAMATISPERSONAE

SCENE: The Roman Empire - ACT I. SCENE I. Alexandria. CLEOPATRA'S palace

SCENE II. Alexandria. CLEOPATRA'S palace

SCENE III. Alexandria. CLEOPATRA'S palace

SCENE IV. Rome. CAESAR'S house

SCENE V. Alexandria. CLEOPATRA'S palace

ACT II. SCENE I. Messina. POMPEY'S house

SCENE II. Rome. The house of LEPIDUS

SCENE III. Rome. CAESAR'S house

SCENE IV. Rome. A street

SCENE V. Alexandria. CLEOPATRA'S palace

SCENE VI. Near Misenum

DRAMATIS PERSONAE.

SCENE: OLIVER'S house; FREDERICK'S court; and the Forest of Arden - ACT I. SCENE I. Orchard of OLIVER'S house

SCENE II. A lawn before the DUKE'S palace

SCENE III. The DUKE's palace

ACT II. SCENEI. The Forest of Arden

SCENE II. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE III. Before OLIVER'S house

SCENE IV. The Forest of Arden

SCENE V. Another part of the forest

SCENE VI. The forest

SCENE VII. The forest

ACT III. SCENE I. The palace

SCENE II. The forest

SCENE III. The forest

SCENE IV. The forest

SCENE V. Another part of the forest

ACT IV. SCENE I. The forest

SCENE II. The forest

SCENE III. The forest

ACT V. SCENE I. The forest

SCENE II. The forest

SCENE III. The forest

SCENE IV. The forest

SCENE: Ephesus

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS

ACT Il. SCENE 1

ACT III. SCENE 1

ACT IV. SCENE 1

ACT V. SCENE 1

SCENE: Rome andthe neighbourhood; Corioli and theneighbourhood; Antium

ACT I. SCENE I. Rome. A street

SCENE II.Corioli. The Senate House.

SCENE III. Rome. MARCIUS'house

SCENE IV. Before Corioli

SCENE V. Within Corioli. A street

SCENE VI. Near the camp of COMINIUS

SCENE VII. The gates of Corioli

SCENE VIII. A field of battle between the Roman and the Volscian camps

SCENEIX. The Roman camp

SCENE X. The camp of the Volsces

ACT II. SCENEI. Rome. A public place

SCENE II. Rome. The Capitol

SCENE III. Rome. The Forum

ACT III. SCENE I. Rome. A street

SCENE II. Rome. The house of CORIOLANUS

SCENE III. Rome. The Forum

ACT IV. SCENE I. Rome. Before a gate of the city

SCENE II. Rome. A street near the gate

SCENE III. A highway between Rome and Antium

SCENE IV. Antium. Before AUFIDIUS' house

SCENE V. Antium. AUFIDIUS' house

SCENE VI. Rome. A public place

SCENE VII. A camp at a short distance from Rome

ACT V. SCENE I. Rome. A public place

SCENE II. The Volscian camp before Rome

SCENE III. The tent ofCORIOLANUS

SCENE IV. Rome. A public place

SCENE V. Rome. A street near the gate

SCENE VI. Corioli. A public place

SCENE: Britain; Italy

ACT I. SCENE I. Britain. The garden of CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE II. Britain. A public place

SCENE III. Britain. CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENEIV. Rome. PHILARIO'S house

SCENE V. Britain. CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE VI. Britain. The palace

ACT II. SCENE I. Britain. Before CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE II. Britain. IMOGEN'S bedchamber in CYMBELINE'S palace; a trunk in one corner

SCENE III. CYMBELINE'S palace. An ante-chamber adjoining IMOGEN'S apartments

SCENE IV. Rome. PHILARIO'S house

SCENE V. Rome. Another room in PHILARIO'S house

ACT III.SCENE I. Britain. A hall in CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE II. Britain. Another room in CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE III. Wales. A mountainous country with a cave

SCENE IV. Wales, near Milford Haven

SCENE V. Britain. CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE VI. Wales. Before the cave of BELARIUS

SCENE VII. Rome. A public place

ACT IV. SCENE I. Wales. Near the cave of BELARIUS

SCENE II. Wales. Before the cave of BELARIUS

SCENE III. Britain. CYMBELINE'S palace

SCENE IV. Wales. Before the cave of BELARIUS

ACT V. SCENE I. Britain. The Roman camp

SCENE II. Britain. A field of battle between the British and Roman camps

SCENE III. Another part of the field

SCENE IV. Britain. A prison

SCENE V. Britain. CYMBELINE'S tent

SCENE.- Elsinore.

Scene II. Elsinore. A room of state in the Castle.

Scene III. Elsinore. A room in the house of Polonius.

Scene IV. Elsinore. The platform before the Castle.

Scene V. Elsinore. The Castle. Another part of the fortifications.

Act II. Scene I. Elsinore. A room in the house ofPolonius.

ACT III. Scene I. Elsinore. A room in the Castle.

Scene II. Elsinore. hall in the Castle.

Scene III. A room in the Castle.

Scene IV. The Queen's closet.

ACT IV. Scene I. Elsinore. A room in the Castle.

Scene II. Elsinore. A passage in the Castle.

Scene III. Elsinore. A room in the Castle.

Scene IV. Near Elsinore.

Scene V. Elsinore. A room in the Castle.

Scene VI. Elsinore. Another room in theCastle.

Scene VII. Elsinore. Another room in the Castle.

ACT V. Scene I. Elsinore. A churchyard.

Scene II. Elsinore. A hall in the Castle.

SCENE.—England and Wales.

Scene II. London. An apartment of the Prince's.

Scene III. London. The Palace.

ACT II. Scene I. Rochester. An inn yard.

Scene II. The highway near Gadshill.

Scene III. Warkworth Castle.

Scene IV. Eastcheap. The Boar's Head Tavern.

ACT III. Scene I. Bangor. The Archdeacon's house.

Scene II. London. The Palace.

Scene III. Eastcheap. The Boar's Head Tavern.

ACT IV. Scene I. The rebel camp near Shrewsbury.

Scene II. A public road near Coventry.

Scene III. The rebel camp near Shrewsbury.

Scene IV. York. The Archbishop's Palace.

ACT V. Scene I. The King's campnear Shrewsbury.

Scene II. The rebel camp.

Scene III. Plain between the camps.

Scene IV. Another part of the field.

Scene V. Another part of the field.

ACT I. SCENE I. Warkworth. Before NORTHUMBERLAND'S Castle

SCENE II. London. A street

SCENE III. York. The ARCHBISHOP'S palace

ACT II. SCENE I. London. A street

SCENE II. London. Another street

SCENE III. Warkworth. Before the castle

SCENE IV. London. The Boar's Head Tavern in Eastcheap

ACT III. SCENE I. Westminster. The palace

SCENE II. Gloucestershire. Before Justice, SHALLOW'S house

ACT IV. SCENE I. Yorkshire. Within the Forest of Gaultree

SCENE II. Another part of the forest

SCENE III. Another part of the forest

SCENE IV.Westminster. The Jerusalem Chamber

SCENE V. Westminster. Another chamber

ACT V. SCENE I. Gloucestershire. SHALLOW'S house

SCENE II. Westminster. The palace

SCENE III. Gloucestershire. SHALLOW'S orchard

SCENE IV. London. A street

SCENE V. Westminster. Near the Abbey

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

ACT I. SCENE I. London. An ante-chamber in the KING'Spalace

SCENE II. London. The Presence Chamber in the KING'S palace

ACT II. PROLOGUE.

SCENE I. London. Before the Boar's Head Tavern, Eastcheap

SCENE II. Southampton. A council-chamber

SCENE III. Eastcheap. Before the Boar's Head tavern

SCENE IV. France. The KING'S palace

ACT III. PROLOGUE.

SCENE I. France. Before Harfleur

SCENE II. Before Harfleur

SCENE III. Before the gates of Harfleur

SCENE IV. Rouen. The FRENCH KING'S palace

SCENE V. The FRENCH KING'S palace

SCENE VI. The English camp in Picardy

SCENE VII. The French camp near Agincourt

ACT IV. PROLOGUE.

SCENE I. France. The English camp at Agincourt

SCENE II. The French camp

SCENE III. The English camp

SCENE IV. The field of battle

SCENE V. Another part of the field of battle

SCENE VI. Another part of the field

SCENE VII. Another part of the field

SCENE VIII. Before KING HENRY'SPAVILION

ACT V. PROLOGUE.

SCENE I. France. The English camp

SCENE II. France. The FRENCH KING'S palace

SCENE: England and France

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

SCENE 6.

ACT II. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

ACT III. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

ACT IV. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 6.

SCENE 7.

ACT V. SCENE 1.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

SCENE: England

SCENE II. The DUKE OFGLOUCESTER'S house

SCENE III. London. The palace

SCENE IV. London. The DUKE OF GLOUCESTER'S garden

ACT II. SCENE I. Saint Albans

SCENE II. London. The DUKE OF YORK'S garden

SCENE III. London. A hall of justice

SCENE IV. London. A street

ACT III. SCENE I. The Abbey at BurySt. Edmunds

SCENE II. Bury St. Edmunds. A room of state

SCENE III. London. CARDINAL BEAUFORT'S bedchamber

ACT IV. SCENE I. The coast of Kent

SCENE II.Blackheath

SCENE III. Another part of Blackheath

SCENE IV. London. The palace

SCENEV. London. The Tower

SCENE VI. London. Cannon street

SCENE VII. London. Smithfield

SCENE VIII. Southwark

SCENE IX. Killing, worth Castle

SCENE X. Kent. Iden's garden

ACT V. SCENE I. Fields between Dartford and Blackheath

SCENE II. Saint Albans

SCENE III. Fields near Saint Albans

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: England and France

SCENE II. Sandal Castle, near Wakefield, in Yorkshire

SCENE III. Field of battle between Sandal Castle and Wakefield

SCENE IV. Another part of the field

ACT II. SCENE I. A plain near Mortimer's Cross inHerefordshire

SCENE II. Before York

SCENE III. A field of battle between Towton and Saxton, in Yorkshire

SCENE IV. Another part of the field

SCENE V. Another part of the field

SCENE VI. Another part of the field

ACT III. SCENE I. A chase in the north of England

SCENE II. London. The palace

SCENE III. France. The KING'S palace

ACT IV. SCENE I. London. The palace

SCENE II. A plain in Warwickshire

SCENE III. Edward's camp, near Warwick

SCENE IV. London. The palace

SCENE V. A park near Middleham Castle in Yorkshire

SCENE VI. London. The Tower

SCENE VII. Before York

SCENE VIII. London. The palace

ACT V. SCENE I. Coventry

SCENE II. A field of battle near Barnet

SCENE III. Another part of the field

SCENE IV.Plains wear Tewksbury

SCENE V. Another part of the field

SCENE VI. London. The Tower

SCENE VII. London. The palace

KING HENRY THE EIGHTH

ACT I. SCENE 1.

ACT I. SCENE 2.

ACT I. SCENE 3.

ACT I. SCENE 4.

ACT II. SCENE 1.

ACT II. SCENE 2.

ACT II. SCENE 3.

ACT II. SCENE 4.

ACT III. SCENE 1.

ACT III.SCENE 2.

ACT IV. SCENE 1.

ACT IV. SCENE 2.

ACTV. SCENE 1.

ACT V. SCENE 2.

ACT V.SCENE 3.

ACT V. SCENE 4.

ACT V. SCENE 5.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: England and France

ACT I. SCENE 1

ACT II. SCENE 1

ACT III. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

ACT IV. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

ACT V. SCENE 1. England. KING JOHN'S palace

SCENE 2. England. The DAUPHIN'S camp at Saint Edmundsbury

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

SCENE 6.

SCENE 7.

SCENE: Rome, the conspirators' camp near Sardis, and the plainsof Philippi.

SCENE II. A public place.

SCENE III. A street. Thunder and lightning.

ACT II. SCENE I.

SCENE II. Caesar's house. Thunder and lightning.

SCENE III. A street near the Capitol.

SCENE IV.Another part of the same street, before the house of Brutus.

ACT III. SCENE I. Rome. Before the Capitol; the Senate sittingabove. A crowd of people, among them Artemidorus and theSoothsayer.

SCENE II. The Forum.

SCENE III. A street.

ACT IV. SCENE I. A house in Rome. Antony, Octavius, andLepidus, seated at a table.

SCENE II. Camp near Sardis. Before Brutus' tent. Drum.

SCENE III. Brutus' tent.

ACT V. SCENE I. The plains of Philippi.

SCENE II. The field of battle.

SCENE III. Another part of the field.

SCENE IV. Another part of the field.

SCENE V. Another part of the field.

Scene: - Britain.

Scene II. The Earl of Gloucester's Castle.

Scene III. The Duke of Albany's Palace.

Scene IV. The Duke of Albany's Palace.

Scene V. Court before the Duke of Albany's Palace.

ACT II. Scene I. A court within the Castle of the Earl ofGloucester.

Scene II.Before Gloucester's Castle.

Scene III. The open country.

Scene IV. Before Gloucester's Castle; Kentin the stocks.

ACT III. Scene I. A heath.

Scene II. Another part of the heath.

Scene III. Gloucester's Castle.

Scene IV. The heath. Before a hovel.

Scene VI. A farmhouse near Gloucester's Castle.

Scene VII. Gloucester's Castle.

ACT IV. Scene I. The heath.

Scene II. Before the Duke of Albany's Palace.

Scene III. The French camp near Dover.

Scene IV. The French camp.

Scene V. Gloucester's Castle.

Scene VI. The country near Dover.

Scene VII. A tent in the French camp.

ACT V. Scene I. The British camp near Dover.

Scene II. A field between thetwo camps.

Scene III. The British camp, near Dover.

SCENE: Navarre

SCENE II. The park

ACT II. SCENE II. The park

ACT III. SCENE I. The park

ACT IV. SCENE I. The park

SCENE II. The park

SCENE III. The park

ACT V. SCENE I. The park

SCENE II. The park

SCENE: Scotland and England

SCENE II. A camp near Forres. Alarum within.

SCENE III. A heath. Thunder.

SCENE IV. Forres. The palace.

SCENE V. Inverness. Macbeth's castle.

SCENE VI. Before Macbeth's castle. Hautboys and torches.

SCENE VII Macbeth's castle. Hautboys and torches.

ACT II. SCENE I. Inverness. Court ofMacbeth's castle.

SCENE II. The same.

SCENE III. The same.

SCENE IV. Outside Macbeth's castle.

ACT III. SCENE I. Forres. The palace.

SCENE II. The palace.

SCENE III. A park near the palace.

SCENE IV. A Hall in the palace. A banquet prepared.

SCENE V. A heath. Thunder.

SCENE VI. Forres. The palace.

ACT IV. SCENE I. A cavern. In the middle, a boiling cauldron.Thunder.

SCENE II. Fife. Macduff's castle.

SCENE III. England. Before the King's palace.

ACT V. SCENE I. Dunsinane. Anteroom in the castle.

SCENE II. The country near Dunsinane. Drum and colors.

SCENE III. Dunsinane. A room in the castle.

SCENE IV. Country near Birnam Wood. Drum and colors.

SCENE V. Dunsinane. Within the castle.

SCENE VI. Dunsinane. Before the castle.

SCENE VII. Dunsinane. Before the castle. Alarums.

SCENE VIII. Another part of the field.

SCENE IX.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: Vienna

SCENE II. A street

SCENE III. A monastery

SCENE IV. A nunnery

ACT II. Scene I. A hall in ANGELO'S house

SCENE II. Another room in ANGELO'S house

SCENE III. A prison

SCENE IV. ANGELO'S house

ACT III. SCENE I. The prison

Scene II. The street before the prison

Act IV. Scene I. The moated grange at Saint Duke's

SCENE II. The prison

SCENE III. The prison

SCENE IV. ANGELO'S house

SCENE V. Fields without the town

SCENE VI. A street near the city gate

ACT V.SCENE I. The city gate

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: Venice, and PORTIA'S house at Belmont

SCENE II. Belmont. PORTIA'S house

SCENE III. Venice. A public place

ACT II. SCENE I. Belmont. PORTIA'S house

SCENE II. Venice. A street

SCENE III. Venice. SHYLOCK'S house

SCENE IV. Venice. A street

SCENE V. Venice. Before SHYLOCK'S house

SCENE VI. Venice. Before SHYLOCK'S house

SCENE VII. Belmont. PORTIA's house

SCENE VIII. Venice. A street

SCENE IX. Belmont. PORTIA'S house

ACT III. SCENE I. Venice. A street

SCENE II. Belmont. PORTIA'S house

SCENE III. Venice. A street

SCENE IV. Belmont. PORTIA'S house

SCENE V. Belmont. The garden

ACT IV. SCENE I. Venice. The court of justice

SCENE II. Venice. A street

ACT V. SCENE I. Belmont. The garden before PORTIA'S house

SCENE: Windsor, and the neighbourhood

ACT I. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

ACT II. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

ACT III SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

ACT IV. SCENE I.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4

SCENE 5.

SCENE 6.

ACT V. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: Athens and a wood near it

SCENE II. Athens. QUINCE'S house

ACT II. SCENE I. A wood near Athens

SCENE II. Another part of the wood

ACT III. SCENE I. The wood. TITANIA lying asleep

SCENE II. Another part of the wood

ACT IV. SCENE I. Thewood. LYSANDER, DEMETRIUS, HELENA, andHERMIA, lying asleep

SCENE II. Athens. QUINCE'S house

ACT V. SCENE I. Athens. The palace of THESEUS

SCENE.—Messina.

Scene II. A room in Leonato's house.

Scene III. Another room in Leonato's house.]

ACT II. Scene I. A hall in Leonato's house.

Scene II. A hall in Leonato's house.

Scene III. Leonato's orchard.

ACT III. Scene I. Leonato's orchard.

Scene II. A room in Leonato's house.

Scene III. A street.

Scene IV. A Room in Leonato's house.

Scene V. The hall in Leonato's house.

ACT IV. Scene I. A church.

Scene II. A prison.

ACT V. Scene I. The street, near Leonato's house.

Scene II. Leonato's orchard.

Scene III. A churchyard.

Scene IV The hall in Leonato's house.

SCENE: Venice and Cyprus

SCENE II. Another street.

SCENE III. A council chamber. The Duke and Senators sitting at a table; Officers attending.

ACT II. SCENE I. A seaport in Cyprus. An open place near thequay.

SCENE II. A street.

SCENE III. A hall in the castle.

ACT III. SCENE I. Before the castle.

SCENE II. A room in the castle.

SCENE III. The garden of the castle.

SCENE IV. Before the castle.

ACT IV. SCENE I. Cyprus. Before the castle.

SCENE II. A room in the castle.

SCENE III. Another room in the castle.

ACT V. SCENE I. Cyprus. A street.

SCENE II. A bedchamber in the castle. Desdemona in bed asleep; a light burning.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: England and Wales

SCENE 2. London. The DUKE OF LANCASTER'S palace

SCENE 3. The lists at Coventry

SCENE 4. London. The court

ACT II. SCENE I. London. Ely House

SCENE 2. Windsor Castle

SCENE 3. Gloucestershire

SCENE 4. A camp in Wales

ACT III. SCENE I. BOLINGBROKE'S camp at Bristol

SCENE 2. The coast of Wales. A castle in view

SCENE 3. Wales. Before Flint Castle

SCENE 4. The DUKE OF YORK's garden

ACT IV. SCENE 1. Westminster Hall

ACT V. SCENE 1. London. A street leading to the Tower

SCENE 2. The DUKE OF YORK's palace

SCENE 3. Windsor Castle

SCENE 4. Windsor Castle

SCENE 5. Pomfret Castle. The dungeon of the Castle

SCENE 6. Windsor Castle

SCENE: England

ACT I. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

ACT II. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

ACT III. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4

SCENE 5.

SCENE 6.

SCENE 7.

ACT IV. SCENE 1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

ACT V. SCENE1.

SCENE 2.

SCENE 3.

SCENE 4.

SCENE 5.

THE PROLOGUE

ACT I. Scene I. Verona. A public place.

Scene II. A Street.

Scene III. Capulet's house.

Scene IV. A street.

Scene V. Capulet's house.

PROLOGUE

ACT II. Scene I. A lane by the wall of Capulet's orchard.

Scene II. Capulet's orchard.

Scene III. Friar Laurence's cell.

Scene IV. A street.

Scene V. Capulet's orchard.

Scene VI. Friar Laurence's cell.

ACT III. Scene I. A public place.

Scene II. Capulet's orchard.

Scene III. Friar Laurence's cell.

Scene IV. Capulet's house

Scene V. Capulet's orchard.

ACT IV. Scene I. Friar Laurence's cell.

Scene II. Capulet's house.

Scene III. Juliet's chamber.

Scene IV. Capulet's house.

Scene V. Juliet's chamber.

ACT V. Scene I. Mantua. A street.

Scene II. Verona. Friar Laurence's cell.

Scene III. Verona. A churchyard; in it the monument of the Capulets.

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

ACT I. SCENE I.Padua. A public place

SCENE II. Padua. Before HORTENSIO'S house

ACT Il. SCENE I. Padua. BAPTISTA'S house

ACT III. SCENE I. Padua. BAPTISTA'S house

SCENE II. Padua. Before BAPTISTA'So house

ACT IV. SCENE I. PETRUCHIO'S countryhouse

SCENE II. Padua. Before BAPTISTA'S house

SCENE III. PETRUCHIO'S house

SCENE IV. Padua. Before BAPTISTA'S house

SCENE V. A public road

ACT V. SCENE I. Padua. Before LUCENTIO'S house

SCENEII. LUCENTIO'S house

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: A ship at sea; afterwards an uninhabited island

THE TEMPEST ACT I. SCENE 1

SCENE 2

ACT II. SCENE 1

SCENE 2

ACT III. SCENE 1

SCENE 2

SCENE 3

ACT IV. SCENE 1

ACT V. SCENE 1

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: Athens and the neighbouring woods

SCENE II. A room of state in TIMON'S house

ACT II. SCENE I. A SENATOR'S house

SCENE II. Before TIMON'S house

ACT III. SCENE I. LUCULLUS' house

SCENE II. A public place

SCENE III. SEMPRONIUS' house

SCENE IV. A hall in TIMON'S house

SCENE V. The Senate House

SCENE VI. A banqueting hall in TIMON'S house

ACT IV. SCENE I. Without the walls of Athens

SCENE II. Athens. TIMON's house

SCENE III. The woods near the sea-shore. Before TIMON'S cave

ACT V. SCENE I. The woods. Before TIMON's cave

SCENE II. Before the walls of Athens

SCENE III. The TIMON's cave, and a rude tomb seen

SCENE IV. Before the walls of Athens

SCENE: Rome and the neighbourhood

ACT II. SCENE I. Rome. Before the palace

SCENE II. A forest near Rome

SCENE III. A lonely part of the forest

SCENE IV. Another part of the forest

ACT III.SCENE I. Rome. A street

SCENE II. Rome. TITUS' house

ACT IV. SCENE I. Rome. TITUS' garden

SCENE II. Rome. The palace

SCENE III. Rome. A public place

SCENE IV. Rome. Before the palace

ACT V. SCENE I. Plains near Rome

SCENE II. Rome. Before TITUS' house

SCENE III. The court of TITUS' house

ACT I. SCENE 1. Troy. Before PRIAM'S palace

ACT I. SCENE 2. Troy. A street

ACT I. SCENE 3. The Grecian camp. Before AGAMEMNON'S tent

ACT II. SCENE 1. The Grecian camp

ACT II. SCENE 2. Troy. PRIAM'S palace

ACT II. SCENE 3. The Grecian camp. Before the tent of ACHILLES

ACT III. SCENE 1. Troy. PRIAM'S palace

ACT III. SCENE 2. Troy. PANDARUS' orchard

ACT III. SCENE 3. The Greek camp

ACT IV. SCENE 1. Troy. A street

ACT IV. SCENE 2. Troy. The court of PANDARUS' house

ACT IV. SCENE 3. Troy. A street before PANDARUS' house

ACT IV. SCENE 4. Troy. PANDARUS' house

ACT IV. SCENE 5. The Grecian camp. Lists set out

ACT V. SCENE 1. The Grecian camp. Before the tent ofACHILLES

ACT V. SCENE 2. The Grecian camp. Before CALCHAS' tent

ACT V. SCENE 3. Troy. Before PRIAM'S palace

ACT V. SCENE 4. The plain betweenTroy and the Grecian camp

ACT V. SCENE 5. Another part of the plain

ACT V. SCENE 6. Another part of the plain

ACT V. SCENE 7. Another part of the plain

ACT V. SCENE 8. Another part of the plain

ACT V. SCENE 9. Another part of the plain

ACT V. SCENE 10. Another part of the plain

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: A city in Illyria; and the sea-coast near it

ACT I. SCENE I. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE II. The sea-coast

SCENE III. OLIVIA'S house

SCENE IV. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE V. OLIVIA'S house

ACT II. SCENE I. The sea-coast

SCENE II. A street

SCENE III. OLIVIA'S house

SCENE IV. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE V. OLIVIA'S garden

ACT III. SCENE I. OLIVIA'S garden

SCENE II. OLIVIA'S house

SCENE III. A street

SCENE IV. OLIVIA'S garden

ACT IV. SCENE I. Before OLIVIA'S house

SCENE II. OLIVIA'S house

SCENE III. OLIVIA'S garden

ACT V. SCENE I. Before OLIVIA's house

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SCENE: Verona; Milan; the frontiers of Mantua

SCENE II. Verona. The garden Of JULIA'S house

SCENE III. Verona. ANTONIO'S house

ACT II. SCENE I. Milan. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE II. Verona. JULIA'S house

SCENE III. Verona. A street

SCENE IV. Milan. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE V. Milan. A street

SCENE VI. Milan. The DUKE's palace

SCENE VII. Verona. JULIA'S house

ACT III. SCENEI. Milan. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE II. Milan. The DUKE'S palace

ACT IV. SCENE I. The frontiers of Mantua. A forest

SCENE II. Milan. Outside theDUKE'S palace, under SILVIA'S window

SCENE III. Under SILVIA'S window

SCENE IV. Under SILVIA'S Window

ACT V. SCENE I. Milan. An abbey

SCENE II. Milan. The DUKE'S palace

SCENE III. The frontiers of Mantua. The forest

SCENE IV. Another part of the forest

ACT I. SCENE I. Sicilia. The palace of LEONTES

SCENE II. Sicilia. The palace of LEONTES

ACT II. SCENE I. Sicilia. The palace of LEONTES

SCENE II. Sicilia. A prison

SCENE III. Sicilia. The palace of LEONTES

ACT III. SCENE I. Sicilia. On the road to the Capital

SCENE II. Sicilia. A court of justice

SCENE III. Bohemia. The sea-coast

ACT IV. SCENE I.

SCENE II. Bohemia. The palace of POLIXENES

SCENE III. Bohemia. A road nearthe SHEPHERD'S cottage

SCENEIV. Bohemia. The SHEPHERD'S cottage

ACT V. SCENE I. Sicilia. The palace of LEONTES

SCENE II. Sicilia. Before the palace of LEONTES

SCENE III. Sicilia. A chapel in PAULINA's house

SCENE: Rousillon; Paris; Florence; Marseilles - ACT I. SCENE 1. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

ACT I. SCENE 1. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

Enter BERTRAM, the COUNTESS OF ROUSILLON, HELENA, and LAFEU, all in black

COUNTESS. In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband. BERTRAM. And I in going, madam, weep o'er my father's death anew; but I must attend hisMajesty's command, to whom I am now in ward, evermore in subjection. LAFEU. You shall find of the King a husband, madam; you, sir, a father. He that so generally is at all times good must of necessity hold his virtue to you, whose worthiness would stir it up where it wanted, rather than lack it where there is such abundance. COUNTESS. What hope is there of his Majesty's amendment? LAFEU. He hath abandon'd his physicians, madam; under whose practices he hath persecutedtime with hope, and finds no other advantage in the process but only the losing of hope by time. COUNTESS. This young gentlewoman had a father- O, that 'had,' how sad a passage 'tis!-whose skill was almost as great as his honesty; had itstretch'd so far, would have made nature immortal, and death should have play for lack of work. Would, for the King's sake, he were living! I think it would be the death of the King's disease. LAFEU. How call'd you the man you speak of, madam? COUNTESS. He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was his great right to be so- Gerard de Narbon. LAFEU. He was excellent indeed, madam; the King very lately spoke of him admiringly and mourningly; he was skilful enough to have liv'd still, if knowledge could be set up against mortality. BERTRAM. What is it, my good lord, the King languishes of? LAFEU. A fistula, my lord. BERTRAM. I heard not of it before. LAFEU. I would it were not notorious. Was this gentlewoman the daughter of Gerard de Narbon? COUNTESS. His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that her education promises; her dispositions she inherits, which makes fair gifts fairer; for where an unclean mind carries virtuous qualities, there commendations go with pity-they are virtues and traitors too. In her they are the better for their simpleness; she derives her honesty, and achieves her goodness. LAFEU. Your commendations, madam, get from her tears. COUNTESS. 'Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise in. The remembrance of her father never approaches her heart but the tyranny of her sorrows takes all livelihood from her cheek. No more of this, Helena; go to, no more, lest it be rather thought you affect a sorrow than to have- HELENA. I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too. LAFEU. Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead: excessive grief the enemy to the living. COUNTESS. If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess makes it soon mortal. BERTRAM. Madam, I desire your holy wishes. LAFEU. How understand we that? COUNTESS. Be thou blest, Bertram, and succeed thy father In manners, as in shape! Thy blood and virtue Contend for empire in thee, and thy goodness Share with thy birthright! Love all, trust a few, Do wrong to none; be able for thine enemy Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend Under thy own life's key; be check'd for silence, But never tax'd for speech. What heaven more will, That thee may furnish, and my prayers pluck down, Fall on thy head! Farewell. My lord, 'Tis an unseason'd courtier; good my lord, Advise him. LAFEU. He cannot want the best That shall attend his love. COUNTESS. Heaven bless him! Farewell, Bertram. Exit BERTRAM. The best wishes that can be forg'd in your thoughts be servants to you! [To HELENA] Be comfortable to my mother, your mistress, and make much of her. LAFEU. Farewell, pretty lady; you must hold the credit of your father. Exeunt BERTRAM and LAFEU HELENA. O, were that all! I think not on my father; And these great tears grace his remembrance more Than those I shed for him. What was he like? I have forgot him; my imagination Carries no favour in't but Bertram's. I am undone; there is no living, none, If Bertram be away. 'Twere all one That I should love a bright particularstar And think to wed it, he is so above me. In his bright radiance and collateral light Must I be comforted, not in his sphere. Th' ambition in my love thus plagues itself: The hind that would be mated by the lion Must die for love. 'Twas pretty, though a plague, To see him every hour; to sit and draw His arched brows, his hawking eye, his curls, In our heart's table-heart too capable Of every line and trick of his sweet favour. But now he's gone, andmy idolatrous fancy Must sanctify his relics. Who comes here?

Enter PAROLLES

[Aside] One that goes with him. I love him for his sake; And yet I know him a notorious liar, Think him a great way fool, solely a coward; Yet these fix'd evils sit so fit in him That they take place when virtue's steely bones Looks bleak i' th' cold wind; withal, full oft we see Cold wisdom waiting on superfluous folly. PAROLLES. Save you, fair queen! HELENA. And you, monarch! PAROLLES. No. HELENA. And no. PAROLLES. Are you meditating on virginity? HELENA. Ay. You have some stain of soldier in you; let me ask you a question. Man is enemy to virginity; how may we barricado it against him? PAROLLES. Keep him out. HELENA. But he assails; and our virginity, though valiant in the defence, yet is weak. Unfold to us some warlike resistance. PAROLLES. There is none. Man, setting down before you, will undermine you and blow you up. HELENA. Bless our poor virginity from underminers and blowers-up! Is there no military policy how virgins might blow up men? PAROLLES. Virginity being blown down, man will quicklier be blown up; marry, in blowing him down again, with the breachyourselves made, you lose your city. It is not politic in the commonwealth of nature to preserve virginity. Loss of virginity is rational increase; and there was never virgin got till virginity was first lost. That you were made of ismetal to make virgins. Virginity by being once lost may be ten times found; by being ever kept, it is ever lost. 'Tis too cold a companion; away with't. HELENA. I will stand for 't a little, though therefore I die a virgin. PAROLLES.There's little can be said in 't; 'tis against the rule of nature. To speak on the part of virginity is to accuse your mothers; which is most infallible disobedience. He that hangs himself is a virgin; virginity murders itself, and should be buried in highways, out of all sanctified limit, as a desperate offendress against nature. Virginity breeds mites, much like a cheese; consumes itself to the very paring, and so dies with feeding his own stomach. Besides, virginity ispeevish, proud, idle, made of self-love, which is the most inhibited sin in the canon. Keep it not; you cannot choose but lose by't. Out with't. Within ten year it will make itself ten, which is a goodly increase; and the principal itself not much the worse. Away with't. HELENA. How might one do, sir, to lose it to her own liking? PAROLLES. Let me see. Marry, ill to like him that ne'er it likes. 'Tis a commodity will lose the gloss with lying; the longer kept, the less worth. Off with't while 'tis vendible; answer the time of request. Virginity, like an old courtier, wears her cap out of fashion, richly suited but unsuitable; just like the brooch and the toothpick, which wear not now. Your date is better in your pie and your porridge than in your cheek. And your virginity, your old virginity, is like one of our French wither'd pears: it looks ill, it eats drily; marry, 'tis a wither'd pear; it was formerly better; marry, yet 'tis a wither'd pear. Will you anything with it? HELENA. Not my virginity yet. There shall your master have a thousand loves, A mother, and a mistress, and a friend, A phoenix, captain, and an enemy, A guide, a goddess, and asovereign, A counsellor, a traitress, and a dear; His humble ambition, proud humility, His jarring concord, and his discord dulcet, His faith, his sweet disaster; with a world Of pretty, fond, adoptious christendoms That blinking Cupid gossips. Now shall he- I know not what he shall. God send him well! The court's a learning-place, and he is one- PAROLLES. What one, i' faith? HELENA. That I wish well. 'Tis pity- PAROLLES. What's pity? HELENA. That wishingwell had not a body in't Which might be felt; that we, the poorer born, Whose baser stars do shut us up in wishes, Might with effects of them follow our friends And show what we alone must think, which never Returns us thanks.

Enter PAGE

PAGE. Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you. Exit PAGE PAROLLES. Little Helen, farewell; if I can remember thee, I will think of thee at court. HELENA. Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a charitable star. PAROLLES. Under Mars, I. HELENA. I especially think, under Mars. PAROLLES. Why under Man? HELENA. The wars hath so kept you under that you must needs be born under Mars. PAROLLES. When he was predominant. HELENA. When he was retrograde, I think, rather. PAROLLES. Why think you so? HELENA. You go so much backward when you fight. PAROLLES. That's for advantage. HELENA. So is running away, when fear proposes the safety: but the composition that your valour and fear makesin you is a virtue of a good wing, and I like the wear well. PAROLLES. I am so full of business I cannot answer thee acutely. I will return perfect courtier; in the which my instruction shall serve to naturalize thee, so thou wilt be capable of a courtier's counsel, and understand what advice shall thrust upon thee; else thou diest in thine unthankfulness, and thine ignorance makes thee away. Farewell. When thou hast leisure, say thy prayers; when thou hast none, remember thy friends. Get thee a good husband and use him as he uses thee. So, farewell. Exit HELENA. Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe to heaven. The fated sky Gives usfree scope; only doth backward pull Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull. What power is it which mounts my love so high, That makes me see, and cannot feed mine eye? The mightiest space in fortune nature brings To join likelikes, and kiss like native things. Impossible be strange attempts to those That weigh their pains in sense, and do suppose What hath been cannot be. Who ever strove To show her merit that did miss her love? The King's disease-my project may deceive me, But my intents are fix'd, and will not leave me. Exit

ACT I. SCENE 2. Paris. The KING'S palace

Flourish of cornets. Enter the KING OF FRANCE, with letters, and divers ATTENDANTS

KING. The Florentines and Senoys are by th' ears; Have fought with equal fortune, and continue A braving war. FIRST LORD. So 'tis reported, sir. KING. Nay, 'tis most credible. We here receive it, A certainty, vouch'd from our cousin Austria, With caution, that the Florentine will move us For speedy aid; wherein our dearest friend Prejudicates the business, and would seem To have us make denial. FIRST LORD. His love and wisdom, Approv'd so to your Majesty, may plead For amplest credence. KING. He hath arm'd our answer, And Florence is denied before he comes; Yet, for our gentlemen that mean to see The Tuscan service, freely have they leave To stand on either part. SECOND LORD. It well may serve A nursery to our gentry, whoare sick For breathing and exploit. KING. What's he comes here?

Enter BERTRAM, LAFEU, and PAROLLES

FIRST LORD. It is the Count Rousillon, my good lord, Young Bertram. KING. Youth, thou bear'st thy father's face; Frank nature, rather curious than in haste, Hath well compos'd thee. Thy father's moral parts Mayst thou inherit too! Welcome to Paris. BERTRAM. My thanks and duty are your Majesty's. KING. I would I had that corporal soundness now, As when thy father and myself in friendship First tried our soldiership. He did look far Into the service of the time, and was Discipled of the bravest. He lasted long; But on us both did haggish age steal on, And wore us out ofact. It much repairs me To talk of your good father. In his youth He had the wit which I can well observe To-day in our young lords; but they may jest Till their own scorn return to them unnoted Ere they can hide their levity in honour. So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were, His equal had awak'd them; and his honour, Clock to itself, knew the true minute when Exception bid him speak, and at this time His tongue obey'd his hand. Who were below him He us'd as creatures of another place; And bow'd his eminent top to their low ranks, Making them proud of his humility In their poor praise he humbled. Such a man Might be a copy to these younger times; Which, followed well, would demonstrate them now But goers backward. BERTRAM. His good remembrance, sir, Lies richer in your thoughts than on his tomb; So in approof lives not his epitaph As in your royal speech. KING. Would I were with him! He would always say- Methinks I hear him now; his plausive words He scatter'd not in ears, but grafted them To grow there, and to bear- 'Let me not live'- This his good melancholy oft began, On the catastrophe and heel of pastime, When it was out-'Let me not live' quoth he 'After my flame lacks oil, to be the snuff Of younger spirits, whose apprehensive senses All but new things disdain; whose judgments are Mere fathers oftheir garments; whose constancies Expire before their fashions.' This he wish'd. I, after him, do after him wish too, Since I nor wax nor honey can bring home, I quickly were dissolved from my hive, To give some labourers room. SECOND LORD. You're loved, sir; They that least lend it you shall lack you first. KING. I fill a place, I know't. How long is't, Count, Since the physician at your father's died? He was much fam'd. BERTRAM. Some six months since, mylord. KING. If he were living, I would try him yet- Lend me an arm-the rest have worn me out With several applications. Nature and sickness Debate it at their leisure. Welcome, Count; My son's no dearer. BERTRAM. Thank your Majesty. Exeunt [Flourish]

ACT I. SCENE 3. Rousillon. The COUNT'S palace

Enter COUNTESS, STEWARD, and CLOWN

COUNTESS. I will now hear; what say you of thisgentlewoman? STEWARD. Madam, the care I have had to evenyour content I wish might be found inthecalendar of my past endeavours; for thenwe wound our modesty, and make foul theclearness of our deservings, when ofourselves we publish them. COUNTESS. What does thisknave here? Get you gone, sirrah.The complaints I have heard ofyou I do notall believe; 'tis my slowness that I do not,for I know you lack not folly to commit themand have ability enough to make such knaveriesyours. CLOWN. 'Tis not unknown to you, madam, I am apoor fellow. COUNTESS. Well, sir. CLOWN. No,madam, 'tis not so well that I am poor, though manyof the rich are damn'd; but if I may haveyour ladyship's good will to go to theworld, Isbel the woman and I will do as wemay. COUNTESS. Wilt thou needs be abeggar? CLOWN. Ido beg your good will in thiscase. COUNTESS. In what case? CLOWN. InIsbel's case and mine own. Service is no heritage; andI think I shall never have the blessing ofGod till I have issue o' my body; for theysay bames are blessings. COUNTESS. Tell me thy reasonwhy thou wilt marry. CLOWN. My poor body, madam,requires it. I am driven on by the flesh;and he must needs go that the devil drives. COUNTESS. Isthis all your worship's reason? CLOWN. Faith, madam, Ihave otherholy reasons, such as they are. COUNTESS. Maythe world know them? CLOWN. I have been, madam, a wickedcreature, as you and all flesh and bloodare; and, indeed, I do marry that I mayrepent. COUNTESS. Thy marriage, sooner than thywickedness. CLOWN. I am out o' friends, madam, and Ihope to have friends for my wife'ssake. COUNTESS. Such friends are thine enemies,knave. CLOWN. Y'are shallow, madam-in great friends; forthe knaves come to do that for me which I amaweary of. He that ears my land spares myteam, and gives me leave to in the crop. If I behis cuckold, he's my drudge. He thatcomforts my wife is the cherisher of myflesh and blood; he that cherishes my fleshand blood loves my flesh and blood; he thatloves my flesh and blood is my friend; ergo,he that kisses my wife is my friend. Ifmen could be contented to be what they are,there were no fear in marriage; for youngCharbon the puritan and old Poysamthe papist, howsome'er their hearts aresever'd in religion, their heads are bothone; they may jowl horns together like anydeer i' th' herd. COUNTESS. Wiltthou ever be a foul-mouth'd and calumnious knave? CLOWN.Aprophet I, madam; and I speak the truth the next way:

For I the ballad willrepeat, Whichmen full true shallfind: Yourmarriage comes bydestiny, Yourcuckoo sings by kind.

COUNTESS. Get you gone, sir; I'll talk with you moreanon. STEWARD. May it please you, madam, that he bidHelen come to you. Of her I am tospeak. COUNTESS. Sirrah, tell my gentlewoman I wouldspeak with her; Helen Imean. CLOWN. [Sings]

'Was this fair face thecause' quothshe 'Whythe Grecians sackedTroy? Fonddone, donefond, Wasthis King Priam'sjoy?' Withthat she sighed as shestood, Withthat she sighed as shestood, Andgave this sentencethen: 'Amongnine bad if one begood, Amongnine bad if one begood, There'syet one good in ten.'

COUNTESS. What, one good in ten? You corrupt the song,sirrah. CLOWN. One good woman in ten, madam, which is apurifying o' th' song. Would God would servethe world so all the year! We'd find nofault with the tithe-woman, if I were the parson. One inten, quoth 'a! An we might have a good womanborn before every blazing star, or at anearthquake, 'twould mend the lottery well: aman may draw his heart out ere 'a pluckone. COUNTESS. You'll be gone, sir knave, and do as Icommand you. CLOWN. That man should be at woman'scommand, and yet no hurt done! Thoughhonesty be no puritan, yet it will do no hurt; itwill wear the surplice of humility over theblack gown of a big heart. I am going,forsooth. The business is forHelen to comehither. Exit COUNTESS. Well,now. STEWARD. I know, madam, you love your gentlewomanentirely. COUNTESS. Faith I do. Her father bequeath'dher to me; and she herself, without otheradvantage, may lawfully make title toas much love as she finds. There is moreowing her than is paid; and more shall bepaid her than she'll demand. STEWARD. Madam, I was verylate more near her than I think she wish'dme. Alone she was, and did communicate to herself herown words to her own ears; she thought, Idare vow for her, they touch'd not anystranger sense. Her matter was, she lovedyour son. Fortune, she said, was no goddess,that had put such difference betwixt theirtwo estates; Love no god, that wouldnot extend his might only where qualitieswere level; Diana no queen of virgins, thatwould suffer her poor knight surpris'dwithout rescue in the first assault, orransom afterward. This she deliver'd in themost bitter touch of sorrow that e'er Iheard virgin exclaim in; which I held myduty speedily to acquaint you withal;sithence, in the loss that may happen, it concernsyou something to knowit. COUNTESS. YOU have discharg'd this honestly; keep itto yourself. Many likelihoods inform'd me ofthis before, which hung so tott'ring in thebalance that I could neither believenor misdoubt. Pray you leave me. Stall thisin your bosom; and I thank you for yourhonest care. I will speak with youfurther anon. Exit STEWARD

Enter HELENA

Even so it was with me when I wasyoung. If ever we are nature's, these areours; this thorn Doth to our rose of youthrightly belong; Our blood to us, this to ourblood is born. It is the showand seal ofnature's truth, Where love's strong passionis impress'd in youth. By our remembrancesof days foregone, Such were our faults, orthen we thought them none. Her eye is sickon't; I observe her now. HELENA. What is your pleasure,madam? COUNTESS. You know,Helen, I am a mother toyou. HELENA. Mine honourablemistress. COUNTESS. Nay, amother. Why not a mother? When I said 'amother,' Methought you saw a serpent. What'sin 'mother' That you startat it? I say I amyour mother, And put you in the catalogue ofthose That were enwombed mine. 'Tis oftenseen Adoption strives with nature, andchoice breeds A native slip to us fromforeign seeds. You ne'er oppress'd me with amother's groan, Yet I express to you amother's care. God's mercy, maiden! does itcurd thy blood To say I am thy mother?What's the matter, That this distemperedmessenger of wet, The many-colour'd Iris,rounds thine eye? Why, that you are mydaughter? HELENA. That I am not. COUNTESS. Isay I am your mother. HELENA. Pardon,madam. The Count Rousillon cannot be mybrother: I am from humble, he from honouredname; No note upon my parents, his allnoble. My master, my dear lord he is; andI His servant live, and will his vassaldie. He must not be mybrother. COUNTESS. Nor I your mother? HELENA.You are my mother, madam; would you were- Sothat mylord your son were not mybrother- Indeed my mother! Or were you bothour mothers, I care no more for than I dofor heaven, So I were not his sister. Can'tno other, But, I your daughter, he must bemy brother? COUNTESS. Yes, Helen,you might be mydaughter-in-law. God shield you mean it not!'daughter' and 'mother' So strive upon yourpulse. What! pale again? My fear hathcatch'd your fondness. Now I see The myst'ryof your loneliness, and find Your salttears' head. Now to all sense 'tis gross Youlove my son; invention is asham'd, Againstthe proclamation of thy passion, To say thoudost not. Therefore tell me true; But tellme then, 'tis so; for, look, thycheeks Confess it, th' one to th' other; andthine eyes See it so grossly shown in thybehaviours That in their kind they speak it;only sin And hellish obstinacy tie thytongue, That truth should be suspected.Speak, is't so? If it be so, you have woundagoodly clew; If it be not, forswear't;howe'er, I charge thee, As heaven shall workin me for thine avail, To tell metruly. HELENA. Good madam, pardonme. COUNTESS. Do you love my son? HELENA.Your pardon, noble mistress. COUNTESS. Love you myson? HELENA. Do not you love him,madam? COUNTESS. Go not about; my love hath in't abond Whereof the world takes note. Come,come, disclose The state of your affection;for your passions Have to the fullappeach'd. HELENA. Then Iconfess, Here on my knee, before high heavenand you, That before you, and next unto highheaven, I love yourson. My friends were poor, but honest; so'smy love. Be not offended, for it hurts nothim That heis lov'd of me; I follow himnot By any token of presumptuoussuit, Nor would I have him till I do deservehim; Yet never know how that desert shouldbe. I know I love in vain, strive againsthope; Yet in this captious and inteniblesieve I still pour in the waters of mylove, And lack not to lose still. Thus,Indian-like, Religious in mine error, Iadore The sun that looks upon hisworshipper But knows of him no more. Mydearest madam, Let not your hate encounterwith my love, For loving where you do; butif yourself, Whose aged honour cites avirtuous youth, Did ever in so true a flameof liking Wish chastely and love dearly thatyour Dian Was both herself and Love; O,then, give pity To her whose state is suchthat cannot choose But lend and give whereshe is sure to lose; That seeks not to findthat her search implies, But, riddle-like,lives sweetly where she dies! COUNTESS. Had you notlately an intent-speak truly- To go toParis? HELENA. Madam, I had. COUNTESS.Wherefore? Tell true. HELENA. I will tell truth; bygrace itself I swear. You know my fatherleft me some prescriptions Of rare andprov'd effects, such as his reading Andmanifest experience had collected Forgeneral sovereignty; and that he will'dme In heedfull'st reservation to bestowthem, As notes whose faculties inclusivewere More than they were in note. Amongstthe rest There is a remedy, approv'd, setdown, To cure the desperate languishingswhereof The King is render'dlost. COUNTESS. This was yourmotive For Paris, was it?Speak. HELENA. My lord your son made me to think ofthis, Else Paris, and the medicine, and theKing, Had from the conversation of mythoughts Haply been absentthen. COUNTESS. But think you,Helen, If you should tender your supposedaid, He would receive it? He and hisphysicians Are of a mind: he, that theycannot help him; They, that they cannothelp. How shall they credit A poor unlearnedvirgin, when the schools, Embowell'd oftheir doctrine, have let off The danger toitself? HELENA. There's somethingin't More than my father's skill, which wasthe great'st Of his profession, that hisgood receipt Shall for my legacy besanctified By th' luckiest stars in heaven;and, would your honour But give me leave totry success, I'd venture The well-lost lifeof mine on his Grace's cure. By such a dayand hour. COUNTESS. Dost thoubelieve't? HELENA. Ay, madam,knowingly. COUNTESS. Why, Helen, thou shalt have myleave and love, Means and attendants, and myloving greetings To those of mine in court.I'll stay at home, And pray God's blessinginto thy attempt. Be gone to-morrow; and besure of this, What I can help thee to thoushalt not miss. Exeunt

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ACT II. SCENE 1. Paris. The KING'S palace

Flourish ofcornets. Enter the KING with divers young LORDStaking leave for the Florentine war; BERTRAM and PAROLLES;ATTENDANTS

KING. Farewell, young lords; these war-likeprinciples Do not throw from you. And you,my lords, farewell; Share the advice betwixtyou; if both gain all, The gift doth stretchitself as 'tis receiv'd, And is enough forboth. FIRST LORD. 'Tis our hope,sir, After well-ent'red soldiers, toreturn And find your Grace inhealth. KING. No, no, it cannot be; and yet myheart Will not confess he owes themalady That doth my life besiege. Farewell,young lords; Whether I live or die, be youthe sons Of worthy Frenchmen; let higherItaly- Those bated that inherit but thefall Of the last monarchy-see that youcome Not to woo honour, but to wed it;when The bravest questant shrinks, find whatyou seek, That fame may cry you aloud. I sayfarewell. SECOND LORD. Health, at your bidding, serveyour Majesty! KING. Those girls of Italy, take heed ofthem; They say our French lack language todeny, If they demand; beware of beingcaptives Before youserve. BOTH. Our hearts receive yourwarnings. KING. Farewell. [To ATTENDANTS] Come hithertome. TheKING retires attended FIRST LORD. O my sweet lord, thatyou will stay behind us! PAROLLES. 'Tis not his fault,the spark. SECOND LORD. O, 'tis bravewars! PAROLLES. Most admirable! I have seen thosewars. BERTRAM. I am commanded here and kept a coilwith 'Too young' and next year' and "Tis tooearly.' PAROLLES. An thy mind stand to 't, boy, stealaway bravely. BERTRAM. I shall stay here the forehorseto a smock, Creaking myshoes on the plainmasonry, Till honour be bought up, and nosword worn But one to dance with. By heaven,I'll steal away. FIRST LORD. There's honour in thetheft. PAROLLES. Commit it, Count. SECONDLORD. I am your accessary; and so farewell. BERTRAM. Igrow to you, and our parting is a tortur'd body. FIRSTLORD. Farewell, Captain. SECOND LORD. Sweet MonsieurParolles! PAROLLES. Noble heroes, my sword and yours arekin. Good sparks and lustrous, a word, goodmetals: youshall find in the regiment of theSpinii one Captain Spurio, with his cicatrice, an emblemof war, here on his sinister cheek; it wasthis very sword entrench'd it. Say to him Ilive; and observe his reports for me. FIRST LORD. Weshall,noble Captain. PAROLLES. Mars dote on you for hisnovices! Exeunt LORDS What will ye do?

Re-enter the KING

BERTRAM. Stay; the King! PAROLLES. Use a morespacious ceremony to the noble lords; youhave restrain'd yourself within the listoftoo cold an adieu. Be more expressive tothem; for they wear themselves in the cap ofthe time; there do muster true gait; eat,speak, and move, under the influence of themost receiv'd star; and though the devillead the measure, such are to be followed.After them, and take a more dilatedfarewell. BERTRAM. And I will doso. PAROLLES. Worthy fellows; and like to prove mostsinewysword-men. ExeuntBERTRAM and PAROLLES

Enter LAFEU

LAFEU. [Kneeling] Pardon, my lord, for me and for mytidings. KING. I'll fee thee to standup. LAFEU. Then here's a man stands that has brought hispardon. I would you had kneel'd, my lord, toask me mercy; And that at mybidding youcould so stand up. KING. I would I had; so I had brokethy pate, And ask'd thee mercyfor't. LAFEU. Good faith,across! But, my good lord, 'tis thus: willyou be cur'd Of yourinfirmity? KING. No. LAFEU. O, will youeat No grapes, my royal fox? Yes, but youwill My noble grapes, an if my royalfox Could reach them: I have seen amedicine That's able to breathe life into astone, Quicken a rock, and make you dancecanary With spritely fireand motion; whosesimple touch Is powerful to araise KingPepin, nay, To give great Charlemain a penin's hand And write to her alove-line. KING. What her is this? LAFEU.Why, Doctor She! My lord, there's onearriv'd, If you willsee her. Now, by myfaith and honour, If seriously I may conveymy thoughts In this my light deliverance, Ihave spoke With one that in her sex, heryears, profession, Wisdom, and constancy,hath amaz'd me more Than I dare blame myweakness. Will you see her, For that is herdemand, and know her business? That done,laugh well at me. KING. Now, goodLafeu, Bring in the admiration, that we withthe May spend our wonder too, or take offthine By wond'ringhow thou took'stit. LAFEU. Nay, I'll fit you, Andnot be all day neither. Exit LAFEU KING. Thus he hisspecial nothing ever prologues.

Re-enter LAFEU with HELENA