THE CAT AND MOUSE - 4 Persian Fairytales - Anon E. Mouse - ebook
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Persia, that magical and mystical land centred on the Silk Route, is a land rich in folk lore. For hundreds and hundreds of years the stories in this book, and many others as well, have been told to the wondering boys and girls of that country, who, as they hear them, picture their native land as one of roses, tulips and pomegranates, where beautiful fairies build their castles in the rosy morn, and black gnomes fly around in the darkness of midnight.As travellers journeyed along the Silk Route they brought with them the folklore from the lands of those both the East and West of Persia. And so, a beautiful tapestry of folklore and children’s tales has been woven over the centuries. Herein are four of these tales which are but a sliver of the immense library of Persian folklore.The stories in this volume are:The Cat and The MouseThe Son of the Soap SellerThe King's TreasureThe King and The FishermanTAGS: Persia, cat, mouse, Folklore, fairytales, myths, legends, children’s stories, Silk Route, Iran, Iraq, east, west, castles, soap seller, son, king, treasure, fisherman, wealth, riches,

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The Cat and the MouseA Book of Persian Fairy Tales

EDITED with an INTRODUCTION By HARTWELL JAMES

WITH FORTY ILLUSTRATIONS By JOHN R. NEILL

Originally Published byHenry Altemus Company, Philadelphia[1906]

Resurrected ByAbela Publishing, London[2017]

The Cat And Mouse

Typographical arrangement of this edition

© Abela Publishing 2017

This book may not be reproduced in its current format in any manner in any media, or transmitted by any means whatsoever, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical ( including photocopy, file or video recording, internet web sites, blogs, wikis, or any other information storage and retrieval system) except as permitted by law without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Abela Publishing,

London

United Kingdom

2017

ISBN-13: 978-8-XXXXXX-XX-X

email: Books@AbelaPublishing.com

Website: www.AbelaPublishing.com

Persia is rich in folk lore. For hundreds and hundreds of years the stories in this book, and many others as well, have been told to the wondering boys and girls of that country, who, as they hear them, picture their native land as one of roses and tulips, where beautiful fairies build their castles in the rosy morn, and black gnomes fly around in the darkness of midnight.

A land, too, where the sun gleams like a fire above the blue mountains, and the water lilies are mirrored in the deep lakes. A land where the eyes of the tigers gleam through the reeds by the riverside, and dark-eyed, sunburned people are quick to love and quick to hate.

The belief in the "Ghool," or "Old Man of the Desert," is still prevalent in Persia, which probably accounts for the popularity of the story of "The Son of the Soap Seller." The other stories selected for this volume are great favorites, but the story of "The Cat and the Mouse" is perhaps the most popular of all.

The frontispiece to this volume is a reduced facsimile of a whole page in a Persian book, showing both the pictures and the reading as they were published in Persia. The other illustrations for "The Cat and the Mouse" are copies of drawings by a Persian artist.

"Two friends on one carpet may with contentment sleep;Two monarchs in one kingdom the peace can never keep.While earth revolves, and little children play,Cats over mice will always hold the sway."

H. J.

The Cat and The Mouse

The Son of the Soap Seller

The King's Treasure

The King and The Fisherman

Frontispiece

"Nobody was happier than this cat"

" 'Now will you take off my head?' "

"The cat had a rosary of beads"

"The mice began to make merry"

"Discreetly they bore their gifts"

"And they went forward trembling"

"Five mice he caught"

"The King was sitting on his throne"

"The armies fell upon each other"

"So he mounted his elephant"

"The lion sprang upon the Princess"

" 'O brothers, buy my pure soap' "

"Things became blacker and blacker"

"Leading a fine lion by a chain"

"They set forth on their journey"

"The rain fell in torrents"

" 'Give me a drink of water' "

"They ran here and there"

" 'Sleep, my son, while I keep watch' "

"A beautiful young woman appeared"

"Every morning Ahmed looked in the cup"

"Ahmed sprang upon the figure"

" 'Ask for anything in reason' "

"A brass vessel full of round white stones"

"Lived in a sheltered valley"

"Abdul Karim was lost in wonder"

"Priests were calling the people to prayer"

"The noise and bustle of the crowded streets"

" 'Two hundred krans!' repeated Abdul Karim"

" 'Get out of my shop!' "

" 'Here are eight krans' "

"Came in sight of his cottage"

"He hid most of the treasure"

" 'Is this fish male or female?' "

"Begged that he would accept the fish"

" 'The matter is closed' "

" 'Are you a human being or a beast?' "

"The fisherman fell on his knees"

"His bag laden with money"

The Cat

The Cat and the Mouse

Showing how one may be lost in wonder at the story of the catand the mouse, when related with a clear and rollingvoice, as if from a pulpit.

CCORDING to the decree of Heaven, there once lived in the Persian city of Kerman a cat like unto a dragon—a longsighted cat who hunted like a lion; a cat with fascinating eyes and long whiskers and sharp teeth. Its body was like a drum, its beautiful fur like ermine skin.

Nobody was happier than this cat, neither the newly-wedded bride, nor the hospitable master of the house when he looks round on the smiling faces of his guests.

This cat moved in the midst of friends, boon companions of the saucepan, the cup, and the milk jug of the court, and of the dinner table when the cloth is spread.

Perceiving the wine cellar open, one day, the cat ran gleefully into it to see if he could catch a mouse, and hid himself behind a wine jar. At that moment a mouse ran out of a hole in the wall, quickly climbed the jar, and putting his head into it, drank so long and so deeply that he became drunk, talked very stupidly, and fancied he was as bold as a lion.