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Opis ebooka Sega games collection - Master system history - J Horsfield @ Heartsmindsmedia

58th anniversary Sega Games Co - Master system specialby Hearts and Minds Media58th anniversary Sega Games Co - Master system specialCollection of my favorite open-wiki material on the Sega games company, with a special feature on the master system console hardware, impact and top 100 games by Retro SanctuaryYou will get a PDF (4MB) file.

Opinie o ebooku Sega games collection - Master system history - J Horsfield @ Heartsmindsmedia

Fragment ebooka Sega games collection - Master system history - J Horsfield @ Heartsmindsmedia

SEGA GAMES COLLECTION - MASTER SYSTEM HISTORY

J Horsfield @ Heartsmindsmedia

PRONOUN

Thank you for reading. If you enjoy this book, please leave a review or connect with the author.

All rights reserved. Aside from brief quotations for media coverage and reviews, no part of this book may be reproduced or distributed in any form without the author’s permission. Thank you for supporting authors and a diverse, creative culture by purchasing this book and complying with copyright laws.

Copyright © 2017 by J Horsfield @ Heartsmindsmedia

Interior design by Pronoun

Distribution by Pronoun

ISBN: 9781537834603

TABLE OF CONTENTS

GAMES THAT DEFINED THE SEGA MASTER SYSTEM

More by John @ HeartsMindsMedia

Sega Games Co – 22nd anniversary master system special

Return learn games

To remember all the memories the sega years have given me and my family…

Sega Games Co., Ltd. (Japanese: 株式会社セガゲームス Hepburn: Kabushiki gaisha Sega gēmusu), originally short for Service Games and officially styled as SEGA, is a Japanese multinational video game developer and publisher headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, with offices around the world. Sega developed and manufactured numerous home video game consoles from 1983 to 2001, but after financial losses incurred from its Dreamcast console, the company restructured to focus on providing software as a third-party developer. Sega remains the world’s most prolific arcadeproducer, with over 500 games in over 70 franchises on more than 20 different arcade system boards since 1981. Sega is known for its multi-million selling game franchises, such as Sonic the Hedgehog, Virtua Fighter, Phantasy Star, Yakuza, and Total War. Sega’s North American division, Sega of America, is headquartered in Irvine, California, having moved from San Francisco in 2015. Sega’s European division, Sega Europe, is headquartered in London.

1History

1.1Company origins (1940–1970s)

1.2Golden age of arcade games (1978–1983)

1.3Entry into the home console market (1982–1989)

1.4Expansion and mainstream success (1989–2001)

1.5Shift to third-party software development (2001–2005)

1.6Continued expansion and acquisitions (2005–2013)

1.7Company reshuffling and digital market focus (2013–present)

2Other products and services

3Company executives

3.1Sega of Japan

3.2Sega of America

3.3Sega Europe

4Seal of Quality

5See also

6References

7External links

HISTORY

CONSOLES[]

Console

Release date(s)

Discontinuation date(s)

Generation

Notes

Picture

SG-1000

JP

: July 15, 1983

[3]

JP

: July 1984

[4]

Third

Sega’s first home console, created in an attempt to transition from the arcade game industry

[5]

Also known as the Sega Computer Videogame SG-1000

Plays

ROM cartridges

Computer version with a built-in keyboard which plays

Sega Card

games released as the SC-3000

[6]

Not commercially successful, because of the number of consoles on the market already and the release of the

Famicom

by

Nintendo

on the same day

[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-SG-1000-Console-Set.jpg

SG-1000 II

JP

: July 1984

[4]

JP

: October 1985

[4]

Third

Upgraded version of the SG-1000 with detachable controllers

[7]

Can play

Sega Card

games in addition to

ROM cartridges

[4]

Computer version with a built-in keyboard which only plays

Sega Card

games released as the SC-3000H

[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-SG-1000-MkII-Console-FL.jpg

Master System

JP

: October 1985

[10]

NA

: 1986

[9]

EU

: 1987

[9]

JP

: 1989

[12]

NA

: 1992

[11]

EU

: 1996

[13]

Third

Sega’s second major home console, released worldwide

Initially released in Japan as the Sega Mark III, the third version of the SG-1000, before being redesigned and rebranded as the Master System

[4]

Plays both

Sega Card

games and

ROM cartridges

[4]

Smaller and cheaper version of the console named the Master System II was released in 1990; it only plays

ROM cartridges

and sold poorly

[9]

Unsuccessfully competed with the

Nintendo

Famicom

in Japan and North America, but was commercially successful in Europe

[9]

Still for sale in Brazil

[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-Master-System-Set.jpg

Genesis

JP

:October 29, 1988

[16]

NA

:August 14, 1989

[15]

EU

:November 30, 1990

[16]

WW: 1997

[17]

[18]

Fourth

Named the Mega Drive outside North America

Sega’s third major home console, after the

SG-1000

and

Master System

; released worldwide

Plays

ROM cartridges

A computer with an integrated Mega Drive was released in Japan as the

Sega TeraDrive

in 1991

[16]

A smaller, lighter version of the console named the Genesis II was released in 1993

[19]

The

Genesis Nomad

, a handheld version of the console that plays the same cartridges, released in 1995; an early version for use on Japanese airplanes was named the Mega Jet

[20]

The

Sega Meganet

Internet service in Japan with the Mega Modem peripheral provided downloadable titles, some exclusive to the service, starting in 1990; it was replaced with the similar

Sega Channel

service in 1993

[21]

Although the system was officially discontinued in 1997, third-party variants have been released around the world as recently as 2009

[22]

Outsold by its main competitors

Nintendo

‘s

Super Famicom

and

NEC

‘s

PC Engine

in Japan,

[23]

but was more successful in some other regions, such as the United States

[24]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-Mega-Drive-JP-Mk1-Console-Set.jpg

Game Gear

JP

: October 6, 1990

[26]

NA

: April 26, 1991

[25]

EU

: April 26, 1991

[25]

JP

: 1996

[27]

NA

:April 30, 1997

[27]

EU

:April 30, 1997

[27]

Fourth

Sega’s first

handheld game console

, released worldwide

Similar to the

Master System

, though it cannot play Master System games without a Master System Converter accessory

[28]

Plays

ROM cartridges

Commercially successful, though it was outsold by its primary competitor, the

Nintendo

Game Boy

[28]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Game-Gear-Handheld.jpg

Sega CD

JP

:December 12, 1991

[30]

NA

:October 15, 1992

[29]

EU

: 1993

[31]

WW: 1996

[32]

Fourth

Add-on

device for the

Genesis

with its own exclusive library

Adds

CD-ROM

support as well as more processing power

[31]

Second version named the Sega CD 2 was released in 1993 to correspond with the second version of the Genesis

[33]

Portable combination of the Genesis and Sega CD named the Genesis CDX in the United States and the Multi-Mega in the PAL region released in 1994

[34]

Sold poorly compared to the Genesis itself

[35]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-CD-Model2-Set.jpg

Sega Pico

JP

: June 26, 1993

[37]

NA

: November 1994

[36]

EU

: 1994

[38]

JP

: 2005

[40]

NA

: February 1998

[39]

EU

: 1997

[38]

Fourth

Video game console aimed at young children, released worldwide

Named the Kids Computer Pico in Japan

Plays

ROM cartridges

shaped like books

[41]

Controlled via a

stylus

and a

graphics tablet

[41]

Sold very well in Japan but poorly elsewhere

[36]

[42]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kids_Computer_Pico-01.jpg

32X

JP

:December 3, 1994

[44]

NA

:November 21, 1994

[43]

EU

: January 1995

[45]

WW: 1996

[46]

Fourth

Add-on

for the

Genesis

with its own exclusive library

Adds more processing power and support for

32-bit games

to the

16-bit

Genesis

[46]

Plays different

ROM cartridges

from the Genesis itself

[46]

Combination release of the Genesis and the 32X codenamed “Neptune” was planned for release in late 1995, but was delayed and then cancelled when the 32X was discontinued

[46]

Considered a commercial failure

[43]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-Genesis-Model2-32X.jpg

Sega Saturn

JP

:November 22, 1994

[48]

NA

: May 11, 1995

[47]

EU

: July 8, 1995

[49]

WW: 1998

[50]

Fifth

Sega’s fourth major home console and only release in the

32-bit console generation

, released worldwide

Plays

CD-ROM

games

Released simultaneously with the

32X

, which also plays 32-bit games

Sega NetLink

accessory, released in 1996, provided Internet and multiplayer gaming access; in Japan it used the

SegaNet

Internet service

[49]

Second version of the console codenamed Sega Pluto, with a built-in NetLink component, was planned but never released

[51]

Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its competitors the

Sony

PlayStation

and

Nintendo 64

[52]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sega-Saturn-Console-Set-Mk1.jpg

Dreamcast

JP

:November 27, 1998

[54]

NA

:September 9, 1999

[53]

EU

:October 14, 1999

[53]

WW:March 30, 2001

[55]

Sixth

Sega’s fifth and final major home console and only major release in the

sixth console generation

, released worldwide

Plays

GD-ROM

games

Includes a built-in modem, which could connect to the

SegaNet

Internet service in Japan and North America and the

Dreamarena

service in Europe

[56]

VMU

accessory serves as a combination memory card, second screen, and simple handheld console

[57]

Considered a commercial failure; sold significantly fewer copies than its main competitor the

Sony

PlayStation 2

because of a poor Japanese launch and lack of

DVD

support

[58]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dreamcast-Console-Set.jpg

Advanced Pico Beena

JP

: August 6, 2005

[40]

N/A

Sixth

Video game console aimed at young children, released only in Japan

Successor to the 1993

Sega Pico

[40]

Plays

ROM cartridges

shaped like books

[40]

Cheaper version named the Beena Lite was released in 2008.

[59]

Still being produced

COMPANY ORIGINS (1940–1970S)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Slot_machines_at_Wookey_Hole_Caves.JPG

SEGA Diamond 3 Star

In 1940, American businessmen Martin Bromley, Irving Bromberg, and James Humpert formed a company called Standard Games in Honolulu, Hawaii, to provide coin-operated amusement machines to military bases. They saw that the onset of World War II, and the consequent increase in the number of military personnel, would mean there would be demand for something for those stationed at military bases to do in their leisure time. After the war, the founders sold that company and established a new distributor called Service Games, named for the military focus. In 1951, the government of the United States outlawed slot machines in US territories, so Bromley sent two of his employees, Richard Stewart and Ray LeMaire, to Tokyo, Japan, in 1952 to establish a new distributor. The company provided coin-operated slot machines to U.S. bases in Japan and changed its name again to Service Games of Japan by 1953.[4][5][6][7]

David Rosen, an American officer in the United States Air Force stationed in Japan, launched a two-minute photo booth business in Tokyo in 1954.[4] This company eventually became Rosen Enterprises, and in 1957, began importing coin-operated games to Japan. On May 31, 1960, Service Games Japan was closed. A few days later, on June 3, two new companies were established to take over its business activities, Nihon Goraku Bussan and Nihon Kikai Seizo.[8] By 1965, Rosen Enterprises grew to a chain of over 200 arcades. Rosen then orchestrated a merger between Rosen Enterprises and Nihon Goraku Bussan, becoming chief executive of the new company, Sega Enterprises, which derived its name from Service Games.[9]

Within a year, Sega began the transition from importer to manufacturer, with the release of the submarine simulator game, Periscope. The game sported light and sound effects considered innovative for that time, eventually becoming quite successful in Japan. It was soon exported to both Europe and the United States, becoming the first arcade game in the US to cost 25 cents per play.[9]

In 1969, Rosen sold Sega to American conglomerate Gulf and Western Industries, although he remained as CEO following the sale. Under Rosen’s leadership, Sega continued to grow and prosper, and in 1974, Gulf and Western made Sega Enterprises, ltd. a subsidiary of an American company renamed Sega Enterprises, Inc., allowing them to take the company’s stock public.

GOLDEN AGE OF ARCADE GAMES (1978–1983)

Sega prospered heavily from the arcade gaming boom of the late 1970s, with revenues climbing to over US$100 million by 1979.[9] In 1982, Sega’s revenues surpassed $214 million. That year they introduced the first game with isometric graphics, Zaxxon,[10] the industry’s first stereoscopic 3D game, SubRoc 3D, and the first laserdisc video game,