Sarri - Mister 33 - Marzio Biancolino - ebook
Opis

Saggi - Essay (48 pagine) - From bank manager, working in some of Europe’s most prestigious financial centres, to coach of SSC Napoli, in pursuit of Maradona’s glory days; a veritable springboard to the amazing Premier League arena at the helm of Chelsea Football Club. That, in a nutshell, is Maurizio Sarri’s unique career path. This is a multi-faceted look at a life full of humanity, fun facts and surprises.“At the time I chose a job which was the only one I would have done for free. I have been a player and coach for absolutely ages. I didn’t just stumble into this profession. Some people still call me ‘the former office worker’, as if it were some sort of crime to have had another type of job.”This is what Maurizio Sarri has to say about himself, looking back on a unique career path that took him from some of the most prestigious financial centres in Europe to the Chelsea FC bench, following a glorious 3 years at SSC Napoli. It is quite unusual to put in your first appearance in ‘Serie A’ at the ripe old age of 55, and within just a year find yourself on the SSC Napoli bench without a footballing career behind you like that of Guardiola, Mancini, Ancelotti or Zidane, but more akin to Mourinho or Sacchi, a comparision which incidentally does not displease Sarri. Add that to finding yourself having to recreate a dream which is almost an imperative: to revive the times of Diego Armando Maradona’s epic heyday. All of this without even remotely imagining that, after a glorious three years under mount Vesuvius, the future would have taken him not only to the UK , but to lead Chelsea F.C. no less.Marzio Biancolino is an author and journalist who has enjoyed success writing for a number of major Italian newspapers, among which “La Repubblica” – (“Satyricon”) and “La Gazzetta dello Sport”. He also had his own daily column in the latter during the 1990 Italian World Cup.By the same author writing as Marco Stretto: “Siamo tutti tifosi della Juventus” (“We are all Juventus fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi dell’Inter” (“We are all Inter fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi del Milan” (“We are all Milan fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi del Napoli” (“We are all Napoli fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi della Roma” (“We are all Roma fans”).

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 79

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS

Marzio Biancolino

SarriMister 33

ESSAY

English translation by Morgan Cox

ISBN 9788825407013

© 2018 Marzio Biancolino

English translation by Morgan Cox

Ebook Edition © 2018 Delos Digital srl

Piazza Bonomelli 6/4 20139 Milano

Version: 1.0

Font League Spartan Bold by Micah Rich, SIL Open Font Licence 1.1

Contents

CoverThis bookThe AuthorSarri - Mister 33ForewordThe originsInterludeThe springboardThe riseThe anointingThe future presentSarri the manWhat others say about himSatirical biographical snippetExcerpt from Maurizio Sarri’s dissertation “The weekly preparation for the match”Maurizio Sarri’s statsTutti gli ebook Bus Stop

This book

From bank manager, working in some of Europe’s most prestigious financial centres, to coach of SSC Napoli, in pursuit of Maradona’s glory days; a veritable springboard to the amazing Premier League arena at the helm of Chelsea Football Club. That, in a nutshell, is Maurizio Sarri’s unique career path. This is a multi-faceted look at a life full of humanity, fun facts and surprises.

“At the time I chose a job which was the only one I would have done for free. I have been a player and coach for absolutely ages. I didn’t just stumble into this profession. Some people still call me ‘the former office worker’, as if it were some sort of crime to have had another type of job.”

This is what Maurizio Sarri has to say about himself, looking back on a unique career path that took him from some of the most prestigious financial centres in Europe to the Chelsea FC bench, following a glorious 3 years at SSC Napoli. It is quite unusual to put in your first appearance in ‘Serie A’ at the ripe old age of 55, and within just a year find yourself on the SSC Napoli bench without a footballing career behind you like that of Guardiola, Mancini, Ancelotti or Zidane, but more akin to Mourinho or Sacchi, a comparision which incidentally does not displease Sarri. Add that to finding yourself having to recreate a dream which is almost an imperative: to revive the times of Diego Armando Maradona’s epic heyday. All of this without even remotely imagining that, after a glorious three years under mount Vesuvius, the future would have taken him not only to the UK , but to lead Chelsea F.C. no less.

The Author

Marzio Biancolino is an author and journalist who has enjoyed success writing for a number of major Italian newspapers, among which “La Repubblica” – (“Satyricon”) and “La Gazzetta dello Sport”. He also had his own daily column in the latter during the 1990 Italian World Cup.

By the same author writing as Marco Stretto: “Siamo tutti tifosi della Juventus” (“We are all Juventus fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi dell’Inter” (“We are all Inter fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi del Milan” (“We are all Milan fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi del Napoli” (“We are all Napoli fans”); “Siamo tutti tifosi della Roma” (“We are all Roma fans”).

Foreword

On the evening of the 30th of November 2015, the word “Chelsea” would most likely have made Maurizio Sarri think first and foremost of the top flight English football team which had just won a Premier League title under José Mourinho, rather than an affluent district of South West London. In any case, something from another planet altogether. But it may just have been that on that very evening the Tuscan coach had the tiniest of inklings that, who knows?, maybe one day he himself would make it to “another planet”.

Let’s go back to that Monday, 30th November 2015. We’re in Italy, at San Paolo Stadium in Naples, and it’s 10.50pm on a cold but clear late-autumn night. The fifth and final minute of extra time is up, and referee Daniele Orsato puts his whistle to his mouth to blow full time.

A final whistle, instantly drowned out by a surge of uncontrollable joy which breaks out on the stands, overflowing with Neapolitan pride, belting out the chorus “Oje vita, oje vita mia, oje core ’e chistu core…” (“Oh life, oh my life, oh heart of this heart…”) from ’O surdato ’nnamurato (The soldier in love). This is what to all intents and purposes can be considered the “azzurri” team anthem, and it is being sung by over 50,000 celebrating fans, mad with joy. The game which has just ended is none other than Napoli vs. Inter Milan, and the former have won 2-1. A very special evening, with important ramifications, because there was more at stake here than just the 3 points for a win; there was also the chance to overtake Inter at the top. A top spot which Napoli had been missing for more than 25 years, since the 29th of April 1990 to be exact, when SSC Napoli, led by Alberto Bigon and well on its way to a second “scudetto” (Serie A title), counted in its ranks a certain Diego Armando Maradona.1

But the night of 30th November 2015 was also an important one for the coach of this Napoli side, who had finally managed to realize a dream and legitimize the claim to a possible scudetto victory. For the very first time in his coaching career, Maurizio Sarri was at the top of the Serie A table.

This would have been a result beyond his wildest dreams when, only one year before, at the age of 56, he had made his late debut in the Italian top flight by leading Empoli,2 a “small town” team, out of the shadow of relegation from Serie A just 4 matches before the end of the season. And all this was done with a well organised, incisive and highly entertaining style of play.

The result would nevertheless have been unthinkable a mere three months beforehand on his Napoli bench debut, characterized as it was by a shaky start which saw Napoli amass only 2 points in three games, losing to Sassuolo on day one and going on to draw with Sampdoria and Empoli in the following 2 matches. A very embarrassing start indeed, considering the enthusiasm generated after the departure of Rafa Benítez.3 So much so that Maradona himself was moved to pronounce these heavy words from Argentina on the 14th of September: “Napoli have played some pretty scary games. They have no game plan and no defence that would allow me to dream of great things. They won’t even get to a mid-table position playing like this. I do respect Sarri, but he isn’t the right coach for a winning Napoli side. De Laurentiis4 has to appoint a coach with the right experience and knowledge to lead the team. This Napoli team reminds me of the Napoli side I first played in, when we were fighting to avoid relegation. That’s my greatest fear”. The new coach responded humbly to these charges: “I am honored that Maradona knows my name. I hope I’ll be able to change his mind a little in the coming months”. Elsewhere however, the Tuscan coach had expressed his thoughts more directly: “Maradona is one of those very few people who can actually say whatever the hell he wants”.

Last but not least, “Mister” Sarri5 was rewarded when, less than two months later, the so-called “Pibe de Oro” (or “Golden Boy”, a nickname for Maradona) had to eat his own words following that 2-1 win over Inter Milan and correct his previous judgement: “I was wrong about Sarri. I apologise”.

Looking back on it now, we know that the historic Serie A result reached on 30 November was rather short-lived, as Inter Milan were to overtake Napoli the very next week when the “azzurri” lost to Bologna.

In any event, Napoli would later regain the so-called “Winter Champions” spot halfway through the tournament by beating the visiting Frosinone with a resounding 5-1 scoreline. This was another result which the club had been missing since Maradona’s days, or more precisely since the 2nd scudetto season of 1989-90. Later, in the second half of the tournament, Napoli had to endure the relentless onslaught of Juventus, who, following an uncertain start to the season, would go on to win its 5th national title in a row.

Indeed, Napoli would not win the prized scudetto even in the following two seasons under Maurizio Sarri, although the “azzurri” came to the attention of fans everywhere for the quality of their football and spectacular playing style, which was pretty much universally admired, even abroad. It is no coincidence that the number 2 spot in the 2016 tournament would be followed by a number 3 spot in 2017 and another second place the following year with a final record-breaking 91 points, although this was not enough to rival a Juventus side which won its 7th consecutive scudetto.

Despite a number of setbacks, including the transfer of Higuain in 2016, the very serious double injury to the Polish striker Milik, who was meant to replace him, plus another serious double injury to the defender Ghoulam, the playing style Maurizio Sarri wanted for his team was consolidated over his three year tenure. Paradoxically, his tactical system of well rehearsed moves would also lead to a revolutionary process which would eventually allow the “diminutive” Mertens to be discovered and perform as a world class centre forward and goalscorer, helping to patch over the period of Milik’s long absence. Shining through all this, Maurizio Sarri’s ability, wisdom and creativity emerged as the pillars of his footballing credo.