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Magic swords and mighty longships. Treacherous maidens and invisible elves. A powerful gold ring. Saga Six Pack 2 presents another awesome collection of classic adventures from the North Atlantic: The Poetic EddaThe NibelungenliedSaga of ThorsteinFridthjof the BoldKing Harald's SagaIngolf's Saga Each text has been newly revised and optimized for digital reading. In addition to these six classic works, there is also: two Saga Image galleries, a link to a free unabridged audio recording of The Nibelungenlied and a Saga Glossary.

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SAGA SIX PACK 2

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The Poetic Edda

The Nibelungenlied

The Saga of Thorstein

Fridthjof the Bold

King Harald’s Saga

Ingolf’s Saga

Saga Six Pack 2

The Poetic Edda Volume 1 by Anonymous. Edited and translated by Damian Stevenson.

The Nibelungenlied by Anonymous. Translated by George Henry Needler. First published in 1904.

The Saga of Thorstein and Fridthjof the Bold by Rasmus Bjorn Anderson. First published in Viking Tales of the North: The sagas of Thorstein, Viking's son, and Fridthjof the Bold in 1901.

King Harald’s Saga and Ingolf’s Saga by Jennie Hall. First published in Viking Tales by Jennie Hall in 1902.

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All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review.

Printed in the United States of America.

First printing, 2015.

Enhanced Media Publishing.

Saga Six Pack 2. Copyright © Enhanced Media 2015.

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Odin and the Völva by Lorenz Frølich (1895)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE POETIC EDDA

By

Anonymous

VOLUME I

LAYS OF THE GODS

VOLUSPO

The Wise-Woman's Prophecy

VAFTHRUTHNISMOL

The Ballad of Vafthruthnir

LOKASENNA

Loki's Wrangling

THRYMSKVITHA

The Lay of Thrym

ALVISSMOL

The Ballad of Alvis

BALDRS DRAUMAR

Baldr's Dreams

RIGSTHULA

The Song of Rig

HYNDLULJOTH

The Poem of Hyndla

THE NIBELUNGENLIED

By

Anonymous

FIRST ADVENTURE

Kriemhild's Dream

SECOND ADVENTURE

Siegfried

THIRD ADVENTURE

How Siegfried came to Worms

FOURTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried fought with the Saxons

FIFTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried first saw Kriemhild

SIXTH ADVENTURE

How Gunther fared to Isenland to Brunhild

SEVENTH ADVENTURE

How Gunther won Brunhild

EIGHTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried fared to his Knights, the Nibelungen

NINTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried was sent to Worms

TENTH ADVENTURE

How Brunhild was received at Worms

ELEVENTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried came home with his Wife

TWELFTH ADVENTURE

How Gunther bade Siegfried to the Feast

THIRTEENTH ADVENTURE

How they fared to the Feast

FOURTEENTH ADVENTURE

How the Queens Berated Each Other

FIFTEENTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried was Betrayed

SIXTEENTH ADVENTURE

How Siegfried was slain

SEVENTEENTH ADVENTURE

How Kriemhild mourned for Siegfried, and How he was Buried

EIGHTEENTH ADVENTURE

How Siegmund fared Home Again

NINETEENTH ADVENTURE

How the Nibelungen Hoard was Brought to Worms

TWENTIETH ADVENTURE

How King Etzel sent to Burgundy for Kriemhild

TWENTY-FIRST ADVENTURE

How Kriemhild fared to the Huns

TWENTY-SECOND ADVENTURE

How Etzel kept the Wedding-feast with Kriemhild

TWENTY-THIRD ADVENTURE

How Kriemhild thought to avenge her Wrong

TWENTY-FOURTH ADVENTURE

How Werbel and Schwemmel brought the Message

TWENTY-FIFTH ADVENTURE

How the Knights all fared to the Huns

TWENTY-SIXTH ADVENTURE

How Gelfrat was Slain by Dankwart

TWENTY-SEVENTH ADVENTURE

How they came to Bechelaren

TWENTY-EIGHTH ADVENTURE

How the Burgundians came to Etzel's Castle

TWENTY-NINTH ADVENTURE

How He arose not before Her

THIRTIETH ADVENTURE

How they kept Guard

THIRTY-FIRST ADVENTURE

How they went to Mass

THIRTY-SECOND ADVENTURE

How Bloedel was Slain

THIRTY-THIRD ADVENTURE

How the Burgundians fought with the Huns

THIRTY-FOURTH ADVENTURE

How they cast out the Dead

THIRTY-FIFTH ADVENTURE

How Iring was Slain

THIRTY-SIXTH ADVENTURE

How the Queen bade set fire to the Hall

THIRTY-SEVENTH ADVENTURE

How the Margrave Ruediger was Slain

THIRTY-EIGHTH ADVENTURE

How all Sir Dietrich's Knights were Slain

THIRTY-NINTH ADVENTURE

How Gunther and Hagen and Kriemhild were Slain

THE SAGA OF THORSTEIN, VIKING'S SON

By Rasmus Bjorn Anderson

IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXX

XIXIIXIIIXIVXVXVIXVIIXVIIIXIXXX

XXIXXIIXXIIIXXIVXXV

THE SAGA OF FRIDTHJOF THE BOLD

IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXX

XIXIIXIIIXIVXV

KING HARALD

By

Jennie Hall

I - The Baby

II - The Tooth Thrall

III - Olaf's Farm

IV - Olaf's Fight With Havard

V - Foes' fear

VI - Harald is King

VII - Harald's Battle

VIII - Gyda's Saucy Message

IX - The Sea Fight

X - King Harald's Wedding

XI - King Harald Goes West-Over-Seas

INGOLF’S SAGA

By

Jennie Hall

IMAGE GALLERY 1

First page from Manuscript C (ca. 1230)

Bronze Valkyrie by H. W. Bissen (1834-5)

Sigurd and Brunhild – Illustration by Harry George Theaker

Siegfried and Kriemhild

Gunther's wedding night (Johann Heinrich Füssli 1807)

"Siegfried's Departure" (Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld, ca. 1843)

Hagen orders servants to sink the hoard in the Rhine (Peter von Cornelius, 1859)

Kriemhild showing Gunther's head to Hagen (Johann Heinrich Füssli, ca. 1805)

Kriemhild and Gunther, Johann Heinrich Füssli, 1807

Siegfried blows his horn (1911) by Arthur Rackham

"Sigurd proofs the sword Gram" (1901) by Johannes Gehrts

Link to free audio recording of The Nibelungenlied

IMAGE GALLERY 2

Title page of Olive Bray's 1908 English translation of the Poetic Edda

Illustration from 1899 edition of Olav Trygvasons saga

A portrait of Christian IV (1577–1648) the King of Denmark-Norway

Odin and the Völva

Thor

The Ash Yggdrasil

"The Wolves Pursuing Sol and Mani"

Cosmos of the nine worlds

Mjolnir in silver

Midvinterblot by Carl Larsson

Sacrifice to Thor

Goddess Frigga

Freyja (1901) by Johannes Gehrts

The Dísablót, by August Malmström

A SAGA GLOSSARY

THE POETIC EDDA

By

Anonymous

VOLUME I

LAYS OF THE GODS

VOLUSPO

The Wise-Woman's Prophecy

1. Silence I ask from the holy races,

From Heimdall's sons, both high and low;

Thou wilt, Valfather, that well I relate

Old tales I remember of men long ago.

2. I remember still the giants of old,

Who gave me bread back in the day;

Nine worlds I recall, the nine in the tree

With mighty roots beneath the mold.

3. Of old was the age when Ymir lived;

Sea nor cool waves nor sand there were;

Earth had not been, nor heaven above,

But a yawning gap, and grass nowhere.

4. Before Bur's sons raised up heaven's vault,

They who the noble mid-earth shaped.

The sun shone from the south over the structure's rocks:

Then was the earth begrown with herbage green.

5. The sun from the south,

The moon's companion,

Her right hand cast about the heavenly horses.

The sun knew not where she a dwelling had.

6. Then sought the gods their assembly-seats,

The holy ones, and council held;

Names then gave they to noon and twilight,

Morning they named, and mid-day, afternoon,

Night and evening, the years to number.

7. The mighty gods met on Ida’s plain,

Shrines and temples they timbered high;

Forges they set, and they smithied ore,

Tongs they wrought, and tools they fashioned.

8. In their dwellings at peace they played at tables,

Of gold no lack did the gods then know,

Till thither came up giant-maids three,

Huge of might, out of Jotunheim.

9. Then sought the gods their assembly-seats,

The exhalted ones, and council held,

To decide who should create the race of dwarfs

From the sea giant’s blood and bones.

10. There was Motsognir the mightiest made

Of all the dwarfs, and Durin next;

Many a likeness of men they forged,

The dwarfs on earth, as Durin related.

11. Nyi and Nithi, Northri and Suthri,

Austri and Vestri, Althjof, Dvalin,

Nar and Nain, Niping, Dain,

Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Nori,

An and Onar, Ai, Mjothvitnir.

12. Vigg and Gandalf Vindalf, Thrain,

Thekk and Thorin, Thror, Vit and Lit,

Nyr and Nyrath,  now have I told—

Regin and Rathsvith—the list aright.

13. Fili, Kili, Fundin, Nali,

Heptifili, Hannar, Sviur,

Frar, Hornbori, Fraeg and Loni,

Aurvang, Jari, Eikinskjaldi.

14. The race of the dwarfs in Dvalin's throng

Down to Lofar the list must I tell;

The rocks they left, and through wet lands

They sought a home in the fields of sand.

15. There were Draupnir and Dolgthrasir,

Hor, Haugspori, Hlevang, Gloin,

Dori, Ori, Duf, Andvari,

Skirfir, Virfir, Skafith, Ai.

16. Alf and Yngvi, Eikinskjaldi,

Fjalar and Frosti, Fith and Ginnar;

So for all time shall the tale be known,

The list of all the forbears of Lofar.

17. Then from the throng did three come forth,

From the home of the gods, the mighty and gracious;

Two without fate on the land they found,

Ask and Embla, empty of might.

18. Soul they had not, sense they had not,

Heat nor motion, nor goodly hue;

Soul gave Othin, sense gave Honir,

Heat gave Lothur and goodly hue.

19. There lives a towering ash named Yggdrasil,

With water white is the great tree wet;

Thence come the dews that fall in the dales,

Green by Urth's well does it ever grow.

20. Thence come the maidens,

Much knowing, three from the hall,

Which under that tree stands; Urd hight the one,

The second Verdandi,—on a tablet they graved—Skuld the third.

Laws they established, life allotted to the sons of men.  

21. The war I recall, the first in the world,

When the gods with spears had smitten Gollveig,

And in the hall of Hor had burned her,

Three times burned, and three times born,

Oft and again, yet ever she lives.

22. Heith they named her who sought their home,

The wide-seeing witch, in magic wise;

Minds she bewitched that were moved by her magic,

To evil women a joy she was.

23. On the host his spear did Othin hurl,

Then in the world did war first come;

The wall that girdled the gods was broken,

And the field by the warlike Wanes was trodden.

24. Then sought the gods their assembly-seats,

The holy ones, and council held,

Whether the gods should tribute give,

Or to all alike should worship belong.

25. Then sought the gods their assembly-seats,

The holy ones, and council held,

To find who with venom the air had filled,

Or had given Oth's bride to the giants' brood.

26. In swelling rage then rose up Thor,

Seldom he sits when he such things hears,

And the oaths were broken, the words and bonds,

The mighty pledges between them made.

27. I know of the horn of Heimdall, hidden

Under the high-reaching holy tree;

On it there pours from Valfather's pledge

A mighty stream: would you know yet more?

28. Alone I sat when the Old One sought me,

The terror of gods, and gazed in mine eyes:

"What hast thou to ask? why comest thou hither?

Othin, I know where thine eye is hidden."

29. I know where Othin's eye is hidden,

Deep in the wide-famed well of Mimir;

Mead from the pledge of Othin each mom

Does Mimir drink: would you know yet more?

30. Necklaces had I and rings from Heerfather,

Wise was my speech and my magic wisdom ...

...Widely I saw over all the worlds.

31. On all sides saw I Valkyries assemble,

Ready to ride to the ranks of the gods;

Skuld bore the shield, and Skogul rode next,

Guth, Hild, Gondul, and Geirskogul.

Of Herjan's maidens the list have ye heard,

Valkyries ready to ride o'er the earth.

32. I saw for Baldr, the bleeding god,

The son of Othin, his destiny set:

Famous and fair in the lofty fields,

Full grown in strength the mistletoe stood.

33. From the branch which seemed so slender and fair

Came a harmful shaft that Hoth should hurl;

But the brother of Baldr was born ere long,

And one night old fought Othin's son.

34. His hands he washed not, his hair he combed not,

Till he bore to the bale-blaze Baldr's foe.

But in Fensalir did Frigg weep sore

For Valhall's need: would you know yet more?

35. One did I see in the wet woods bound,

A lover of ill, and to Loki like;

By his side does Sigyn sit, nor is glad

To see her mate: would you know yet more?

36. From the east there pours through poisoned vales

With swords and daggers the river Slith...

37. Northward a hall in Nithavellir

Of gold there rose for Sindri's race;

And in Okolnir another stood,

Where the giant Brimir his beer-hall had.

38. A hall I saw, far from the sun,

On Nastrond it stands, and the doors face north,

Venom drops through the smoke-vent down,

For around the walls do serpents wind.

39. Then the Vala knew the fatal bonds

Were twisting, most rigid,

Bonds from entrails made. 

40. The giantess old in Ironwood sat,

In the east, and bore the brood of Fenrir;

Among these one in monster's guise

Was soon to steal the sun from the sky.

41. There feeds he full on the flesh of the dead,

And the home of the gods he reddens with gore;

Dark grows the sun, and in summer soon

Come mighty storms: would you know yet more?

42. On a hill there sat, and smote on his harp,

Eggther the joyous, the giants' warder;

Above him the cock in the bird-wood crowed,

Fair and red did Fjalar stand.

43. Then to the gods crowed Gollinkambi,

He wakes the heroes in Othin's hall;

And beneath the earth does another crow,

The rust-red bird at the bars of Hel.

44. Further forward I see,

Much can I say of Ragnarök and the gods' conflict.

45. Brothers shall fight, and slay each other;

Cousins shall kinship violate. The earth resounds, the giantesses flee;

No man will another spare.

46. Hard is it in the world,

Great whoredom, an axe age, a sword age,

Shields shall be cloven, a wind age, a wolf age, ere the world sinks.

47. Yggdrasil shakes, and shiver on high

The ancient limbs, and the giant is loose;

To the head of Mim does Othin give heed,

But the kinsman of Surt shall slay him soon.

48. How fare the gods? How fare the elves?

All Jotunheim groans, the gods are at council;

Loud roar the dwarfs by the doors of stone,

The masters of the rocks: would you know yet more?

49. Now Garm howls loud before Gnipahellir,

The fetters will burst, and the wolf run free

Much do I know, and more can see

Of the fate of the gods, the mighty in fight.

50. From the east comes Hrym with shield held high;

In giant-wrath does the serpent writhe;

O'er the waves he twists, and the tawny eagle

Gnaws corpses screaming; Naglfar is loose.

51. O'er the sea from the north there sails a ship

With the people of Hel, at the helm stands Loki;

After the wolf do wild men follow,

And with them the brother of Byleist goes.

52. How is it with the Æsir?

How with the Alfar? All Jötunheim resounds; the Æsir are in council.

The dwarfs groan before their stony doors, the sages of the rocky walls.

Understand ye yet, or what?

53. Then arises Hlin's second grief,

When Odin goes with the wolf to fight,

And the bright slayer of Beli with Surt.

Then will Frigg's beloved fall.

54. Then comes Sigfather's mighty son,

Vithar, to fight with the foaming wolf;

In the giant's son does he thrust his sword

Full to the heart: his father is avenged.

55. Hither there comes the son of Hlothyn,

The bright snake gapes to heaven above;

Against the serpent goes Othin's son.

56. In anger smites the warder of earth,

Forth from their homes must all men flee;

Nine paces fares the son of Fjorgyn,

And, slain by the serpent, fearless he sinks.

57. The sun turns black, earth sinks in the sea,

The hot stars down from heaven are whirled;

Fierce grows the steam and the life-feeding flame,

Till fire leaps high about heaven itself.

58. Now Garm howls loud before Gnipahellir,

The fetters will burst, and the wolf run free;

Much do I know, and more can see

Of the fate of the gods, the mighty in fight.

59. Now do I see the earth anew

Rise all green from the waves again;

The cataracts fall, and the eagle flies,

And fish he catches beneath the cliffs.

60. The gods in Ithavoll meet together,

Of the terrible girdler of earth they talk,

And the mighty past they call to mind,

And the ancient runes of the Ruler of Gods.

61. In wondrous beauty once again

Shall the golden tables stand mid the grass,

Which the gods had owned in the days of old...  

62. Then fields unsowed bear ripened fruit,

All ills grow better, and Baldr comes back;

Baldr and Hoth dwell in Hropt's battle-hall,

And the mighty gods: would you know yet more?

63. Then Honir wins the prophetic wand ....

And the sons of the brothers of Tveggi abide

In Vindheim now: would you know yet more?

64. More fair than the sun, a hall I see,

Roofed with gold, on Gimle it stands;

There shall the righteous rulers dwell,

And happiness ever there shall they have.

65. There comes on high, all power to hold,

A mighty lord, all lands he rules...

66. From below the dragon dark comes forth,

Nithhogg flying from Nithafjoll;

The bodies of men on his wings he bears,

The serpent bright: but now must I sink.

VAFTHRUTHNISMOL

The Ballad of Vafthruthnir

––––––––

Othin spake:

1. "Counsel me, Frigg, for I long to fare,

And Vafthruthnir fain would find;

fit wisdom old with the giant wise

Myself would I seek to match."

Frigg spake:

2. "Heerfather here at home would I keep,

Where the gods together dwell;

Amid all the giants an equal in might

To Vafthruthnir know I none."

Othin spake:

3. "Much have I fared, much have I found.

Much have I got from the gods;

And fain would I know how Vafthruthnir now

Lives in his lofty hall."

Frigg spake:

4. "Safe mayst thou go, safe come again,

And safe be the way thou wendest!

Father of men, let thy mind be keen

When speech with the giant thou seekest."

5. The wisdom then of the giant wise

Forth did he fare to try;

He found the hall of the father of Im,

And in forthwith went Ygg.

Othin spake:

6. "Vafthruthnir, hail! to thy hall am I come,

For thyself I fain would see;

And first would I ask if wise thou art,

Or, giant, all wisdom hast won."

Vafthruthnir spake:

7. "Who is the man that speaks to me,

Here in my lofty hall?

Forth from our dwelling thou never shalt fare,

Unless wiser than I thou art."

Othin spake:

8. "Gagnrath they call me, and thirsty I come

From a journey hard to thy hall;

Welcome I look for, for long have I fared,

And gentle greeting, giant."

Vafthruthnir spake:

9. "Why standest thou there on the floor whilst thou speakest?

A seat shalt thou have in my hall;

hen soon shall we know whose knowledge is more,

The guest's or the sage's gray."

Othin spake:

10. "If a poor man reaches the home of the rich,

Let him wisely speak or be still;

For to him who speaks with the hard of heart

Will chattering ever work ill."

Vafthruthnir spake:

11. "Speak forth now, Gagnrath, if there from the floor

Thou wouldst thy wisdom make known:

What name has the steed that each morn anew

The day for mankind doth draw?"

Othin spake:

12. "Skinfaxi is he, the steed who for men

The glittering day doth draw;

The best of horses to heroes he seems,

And brightly his mane doth burn."

Vafthruthnir spake:

13. "Speak forth now, Gagnrath, if there from the floor

Thou wouldst thy wisdom make known:

What name has the steed that from East anew

Brings night for the noble gods?"

Othin spake:

14. "Hrimfaxi name they the steed that anew

Brings night for the noble gods;

Each morning foam from his bit there falls,

And thence come the dews in the dales."

Vafthruthnir spake:

15. "Speak forth now, Gagnrath, if there from the floor

Thou wouldst thy wisdom make known:

What name has the river that 'twixt the realms

Of the gods and the giants goes?"

Othin spoke:

16. "Ifing is the river that 'twixt the realms

Of the gods and the giants goes;

For all time ever open it flows,

No ice on the river there is."

Vafthruthnir spake:

17. "Speak forth now, Gagnrath, if there from the floor

Thou wouldst thy wisdom make known:

What name has the field where in fight shall meet

Surt and the gracious gods?"

Othin spake:

18. "Vigrith is the field where in fight shall meet

Surt and the gracious gods;

A hundred miles each way does it measure.

And so are its boundaries set."

Vafthruthnir spake:

19. "Wise art thou, guest! To my bench shalt thou go,

In our seats let us speak together;

Here in the hall our heads, O guest,

Shall we wager our wisdom upon."

Othin spake:

20. "First answer me well, if thy wisdom avails,

And thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

In earliest time whence came the earth,

Or the sky, thou giant sage?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

21. "Out of Ymir's flesh was fashioned the earth,

And the mountains were made of his bones;

The sky from the frost-cold giant's skull,

And the ocean out of his blood."

Othin spake:

22. "Next answer me well, if thy wisdom avails,

And thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

Whence came the moon, o'er the world of men

That fares, and the flaming sun?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

23. "Mundilferi is he who begat the moon,

And fathered the flaming sun;

The round of heaven each day they run,

To tell the time for men."

Othin spake:

24. "Third answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

Whence came the day, o'er mankind that fares,

Or night with the narrowing moon?"

25. "The father of day is Delling called,

And the night was begotten by Nor;

Full moon and old by the gods were fashioned,

To tell the time for men."

Othin spake:

26. "Fourth answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

Whence did winter come, or the summer warm,

First with the gracious gods?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

27. "Vindsval he was who was winter's father,

And Svosuth summer begat...

Othin spake:

28. "Fifth answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

What giant first was fashioned of old,

And the eldest of Ymir's kin?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

29. "Winters unmeasured ere earth was made

Was the birth of Bergelmir;

Thruthgelmir's son was the giant strong,

And Aurgelmir's grandson of old."

Othin spake:

30. "Sixth answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

Whence did Aurgelmir come with the giants' kin,

Long since, thou giant sage?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

31. "Down from Elivagar did venom drop,

And waxed till a giant it was;

And thence arose our giants' race,

And thus so fierce are we found."

Othin spake:

32. "Seventh answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

How begat he children, the giant grim,

Who never a giantess knew?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

33. "They say 'neath the arms of the giant of ice

Grew man-child and maid together;

And foot with foot did the wise one fashion

A son that six heads bore."

Othin spake:

34. "Eighth answer me well, if wise thou art called,

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

What farthest back dost thou bear in mind?

For wide is thy wisdom, giant!"

35. "Winters unmeasured ere earth was made

Was the birth of Bergelmir;

This first knew I well, when the giant wise

In a boat of old was borne."

Othin spake:

36. "Ninth answer me well, if wise thou art called

If thou knowest it, Vafthruthnir, now:

Whence comes the wind that fares o'er the waves

Yet never itself is seen?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

37. "In an eagle's guise at the end of heaven

Hraesvelg sits, they say;

And from his wings does the wind come forth

To move o'er the world of men."

Othin spake:

38. "Tenth answer me now, if thou knowest all

The fate that is fixed for the gods:

Whence came up Njorth to the kin of the gods,

(Rich in temples and shrines he rules,)

Though of gods he was never begot?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

39. "In the home of the Wanes | did the wise ones create him,

And gave him as pledge to the gods;

At the fall of the world | shall he fare once more

Home to the Wanes so wise."

Othin spake:

40. "Eleventh answer me well,

What men ... in ... home

Each day to fight go forth?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

41. "The heroes all in Othin's hall

Each day to fight go forth;

They fell each other, and fare from the fight

All healed full soon to sit."

Othin spake:

42. "Twelfth answer me now how all thou knowest

Of the fate that is fixed for the gods;

Of the runes of the gods and the giants' race

The truth indeed dost thou tell,

(And wide is thy wisdom, giant!)"

Vafthruthnir spake:

43. "Of the runes of the gods and the giants' race

The truth indeed can I tell,

(For to every world have I won;)

To nine worlds came I, to Niflhel beneath,

The home where dead men dwell."

Othin spake:

44. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got of the gods:

What shall live of mankind when at last there comes

The mighty winter to men?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

45. "In Hoddmimir's wood shall hide themselves

Lif and Lifthrasir then;

The morning dews for meat shall they have,

Such food shall men then find."

Othin spake:

46. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got of the gods:

Whence comes the sun to the smooth sky back,

When Fenrir has snatched it forth?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

47. "A daughter bright Alfrothul bears

Ere Fenrir snatches her forth;

Her mother's paths shall the maiden tread

When the gods to death have gone."

Othin spake:

48. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got of the gods:

What maidens are they, so wise of mind.

That forth o'er the sea shall fare?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

49. "O'er Mogthrasir's hill shall the maidens pass,

And three are their throngs that come;

They all shall protect the dwellers on earth,

Though they come of the giants' kin."

Othin spake:

50. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got of the gods:

Who then shall rule the realm of the gods,

When the fires of Surt have sunk?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

51. "In the gods' home Vithar and Vali shall dwell,

When the fires of Surt have sunk;

Mothi and Magni shall Mjollnir have

When Vingnir falls in fight."

Othin spake:

52. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got of the gods:

What shall bring the doom of death to Othin,

When the gods to destruction go?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

53. "The wolf shall fell the father of men,

And this shall Vithar avenge;

The terrible jaws shall he tear apart,

And so the wolf shall he slay."

Othin spake:

54. "Much have I fared, much have I found,

Much have I got from the gods:

What spake Othin himself in the ears of his son,

Ere in the bale-fire he burned?"

Vafthruthnir spake:

55. "No man can tell what in olden time

Thou spak'st in the ears of thy son;

With fated mouth the fall of the gods

And mine olden tales have I told;

With Othin in knowledge now have I striven,

And ever the wiser thou art."

LOKASENNA

Loki's Wrangling

––––––––

Loki spake:

1. "Speak now, Eldir, for not one step

Farther shalt thou fare;

What ale-talk here do they have within,

The sons of the glorious gods?"

Eldir spake:

2. "Of their weapons they talk, and their might in war,

The sons of the glorious gods;

From the gods and elves who are gathered here

No friend in words shalt thou find."

Loki spake:

3. "In shall I go into Aegir's hall,

For the feast I fain would see;

Bale and hatred I bring to the gods,

And their mead with venom I mix."

Eldir spake:

4. "If in thou goest to Aegir's hall,

And fain the feast wouldst see,

And with slander and spite wouldst sprinkle the gods,

Think well lest they wipe it on thee."

Loki spake:

5. "Bethink thee, Eldir, if thou and I

Shall strive with spiteful speech;

Richer I grow in ready words

If thou speakest too much to me."

Then Loki went into the hall, but when they who were there saw who had entered, they were all silent.

Loki spake:

6. "Thirsty I come into this thine hall,

I, Lopt, from a journey long,

To ask of the gods that one should give

Fair mead for a drink to me.

7. "Why sit ye silent, swollen with pride,

Ye gods, and no answer give?

At your feast a place and a seat prepare me,

Or bid me forth to fare."

Bragi spake:

8. "A place and a seat will the gods prepare

No more in their midst for thee;

For the gods know well what men they wish

To find at their mighty feasts."

Loki spake:

9. "Remember, Othin, in olden days

That we both our blood have mixed;

Then didst thou promise no ale to pour,

Unless it were brought for us both."

Othin spake:

10. "Stand forth then, Vithar, and let the wolf's father

Find a seat at our feast;

Lest evil should Loki speak aloud

Here within Aegir's hall."

Then Vithar arose and poured drink for Loki; but before he drank he spoke to the gods:

11. "Hail to you, gods! ye goddesses, hail!

Hail to the holy throng!

Save for the god who yonder sits,

Bragi there on the bench."

Bragi spake:

12. "A horse and a sword from my hoard will I give,

And a ring gives Bragi to boot,

That hatred thou makst not among the gods;

So rouse not the great ones to wrath."

Loki spake:

13. "In horses and rings thou shalt never be rich,

Bragi, but both shalt thou lack;

Of the gods and elves here together met

Least brave in battle art thou,

(And shyest thou art of the shot.)"

Bragi spake:

14. "Now were I without as I am within,

And here in Aegir's hall,

Thine head would I bear in mine hands away,

And pay thee the price of thy lies."

Loki spake:

15. "In thy seat art thou bold, not so are thy deeds,

Bragi, adorner of benches!

Go out and fight if angered thou feelest,

No hero such forethought has."

Ithun spake:

16. "Well, prithee, Bragi, his kinship weigh,

Since chosen as wish-son he was;

And speak not to Loki such words of spite

Here within Aegir's hall."

Loki spake:

17. "Be silent, Ithun! thou art, I say,

Of women most lustful in love,

Since thou thy washed-bright | arms didst wind

About thy brother's slayer."

Ithun spake:

18. "To Loki I speak not with spiteful words

Here within Aegir's hall;

And Bragi I calm, who is hot with beer,

For I wish not that fierce they should fight."

Gefjun spake:

19. "Why, ye gods twain, with bitter tongues

Raise hate among us here?

Loki is famed for his mockery foul,

And the dwellers in heaven he hates."

Loki spake:

20. "Be silent, Gefjun! for now shall I say

Who led thee to evil life;

The boy so fair gave a necklace bright,

And about him thy leg was laid."

Othin spake:

21. "Mad art thou, Loki, and little of wit,

The wrath of Gefjun to rouse;

For the fate that is set for all she sees,

Even as I, methinks."

Loki spake:

22. "Be silent, Othin! not justly thou settest

The fate of the fight among men;

Oft gavst thou to him who deserved not the gift,

To the baser, the battle's prize."

Othin spake:

23. "Though I gave to him who deserved not the gift,

To the baser, the battle's prize;

Winters eight wast thou under the earth,

Milking the cows as a maid,

(Ay, and babes didst thou bear;

Unmanly thy soul must seem.)"

Loki spake:

24. "They say that with spells | in Samsey once

Like witches with charms didst thou work;

And in witch's guise among men didst thou go;

Unmanly thy soul must seem."

Frigg spake:

25. "Of the deeds ye two of old have done

Ye should make no speech among men;

Whate'er ye have done in days gone by,

Old tales should ne'er be told."

Loki spake:

26. "Be silent, Frigg! thou art Fjorgyn's wife,

But ever lustful in love;

For Vili and Ve, thou wife of Vithrir,

Both in thy bosom have lain."

Frigg spake:

27. "If a son like Baldr were by me now,

Here within Aegir's hall,

From the sons of the gods thou shouldst go not forth

Till thy fierceness in fight were tried."

Loki spake:

28. "Thou wilt then, Frigg, that further I tell

Of the ill that now I know;

Mine is the blame that Baldr no more

Thou seest ride home to the hall."

Freyja spake:

29. "Mad art thou, Loki, that known thou makest

The wrong and shame thou hast wrought;

The fate of all does Frigg know well,

Though herself she says it not."

Loki spake:

30. "Be silent, Freyja! for fully I know thee,

Sinless thou art not thyself;

Of the gods and elves who are gathered here,

Each one as thy lover has lain."

Freyja spake:

31. "False is thy tongue, and soon shalt thou find

That it sings thee an evil song;

The gods are wroth, and the goddesses all,

And in grief shalt thou homeward go."

Loki spake:

32. "Be silent, Freyja! thou foulest witch,

And steeped full sore in sin;

In the arms of thy brother the bright gods caught thee

When Freyja her wind set free."

Njorth spake:

33. "Small ill does it work though a woman may have

A lord or a lover or both;

But a wonder it is that this womanish god

Comes hither, though babes he has borne."

Loki spake:

34. "Be silent, Njorth; thou wast eastward sent,

To the gods as a hostage given;

And the daughters of Hymir their privy had

When use did they make of thy mouth."

Njorth spake:

35. "Great was my gain, though long was I gone,

To the gods as a hostage given;

The son did I have whom no man hates,

And foremost of gods is found."

Loki spake:

36. "Give heed now, Njorth, nor boast too high,

No longer I hold it hid;

With thy sister hadst thou so fair a son,

Thus hadst thou no worse a hope."

Tyr spake:

37. "Of the heroes brave is Freyr the best

Here in the home of the gods;

He harms not maids nor the wives of men,

And the bound from their fetters he frees."

Loki spake:

38. "Be silent, Tyr! for between two men

Friendship thou ne'er couldst fashion;

Fain would I tell how Fenrir once

Thy right hand rent from thee."

Tyr spake:

39. "My hand do I lack, but Hrothvitnir thou,

And the loss brings longing to both;

Ill fares the wolf who shall ever await

In fetters the fall of the gods."

Loki spake:

40. "Be silent, Tyr! for a son with me

Thy wife once chanced to win;

Not a penny, methinks, wast thou paid for the wrong,

Nor wast righted an inch, poor wretch."

Freyr spake:

Till the gods to destruction go;

Thou too shalt soon, if thy tongue is not stilled,

Be fettered, thou forger of ill."

Loki spake:

42. "The daughter of Gymir with gold didst thou buy,

And sold thy sword to boot;

But when Muspell's sons through Myrkwood ride,

Thou shalt weaponless wait, poor wretch."

Byggvir spake:

43. "Had I birth so famous as Ingunar-Freyr,

And sat in so lofty a seat,

I would crush to marrow this croaker of ill,

And beat all his body to bits."

Loki spake:

44. "What little creature goes crawling there,

Snuffling and snapping about?

At Freyr's ears ever wilt thou be found,

Or muttering hard at the mill."

Byggvir spake:

45. "Byggvir my name, and nimble am I,

As gods and men do grant;

And here am I proud that the children of Hropt

Together all drink ale."

Loki spake:

46. "Be silent, Byggvir! thou never couldst set

Their shares of the meat for men;

Hid in straw on the floor, they found thee not

When heroes were fain to fight."

Heimdall spake:

47. "Drunk art thou, Loki, and mad are thy deeds,

Why, Loki, leavst thou this not?

For drink beyond measure will lead all men

No thought of their tongues to take."

Loki spake:

48. "Be silent, Heimdall! in days long since

Was an evil fate for thee fixed;

With back held stiff must thou ever stand,

As warder of heaven to watch."

Skathi spake:

49. "Light art thou, Loki, but longer thou mayst not

In freedom flourish thy tail;

On the rocks the gods bind thee with bowels torn

Forth from thy frost-cold son."

Loki spake:

50. "Though on rocks the gods bind me with bowels torn

Forth from my frost-cold son,

I was first and last at the deadly fight

There where Thjazi we caught."

Skathi spake:

51. "Wert thou first and last at the deadly fight

There where Thjazi was caught,

From my dwellings and fields shall ever come forth

A counsel cold for thee."

Loki spake:

52. "More lightly thou spakest with Laufey's son,

When thou badst me come to thy bed;

Such things must be known if now we two

Shall seek our sins to tell."

Then Sif came forward and poured mead for Loki in a crystal cup, and said:

53. "Hail too thee, Loki, and take thou here

The crystal cup of old mead;

For me at least, alone of the gods,

Blameless thou knowest to be."

He took the horn, and drank therefrom:

54. "Alone thou wert if truly thou wouldst

All men so shyly shun;

But one do I know full well, methinks,

Who had thee from Hlorrithi's arms,

(Loki the crafty in lies.)"

Beyla spake:

55. "The mountains shake, and surely I think

From his home comes Hlorrithi now;

He will silence the man who is slandering here

Together both gods and men."

Loki spake:

56. "Be silent, Beyla! thou art Byggvir's wife,

And deep art thou steeped in sin;

A greater shame to the gods came ne'er,

Befouled thou art with thy filth."

Then came Thor forth, and spake:

57. "Unmanly one, cease, or the mighty hammer,

Mjollnir, shall close thy mouth;

Thy shoulder-cliff shall I cleave from thy neck,

And so shall thy life be lost."

Loki spake:

58. "Lo, in has come the son of Earth:

Why threaten so loudly, Thor?

Less fierce thou shalt go to fight with the wolf

When he swallows Sigfather up."

Thor spake:

59. "Unmanly one, cease, or the mighty hammer,

Mjollnir, shall close thy mouth;

I shall hurl thee up and out in the East,

Where men shall see thee no more."

Loki spake:

60. "That thou hast fared on the East-road forth

To men shouldst thou say no more;

In the thumb of a glove didst thou hide, thou great one,

And there forgot thou wast Thor."

Thor spake:

61. "Unmanly one, cease, or the mighty hammer,

Mjollnir, shall close thy mouth;

My right hand shall smite thee with Hrungnir's slayer,

Till all thy bones are broken."

Loki spake:

62. "Along time still do I think to live,

Though thou threatenest thus with thy hammer;

Rough seemed the straps of Skrymir's wallet,

When thy meat thou mightest not get,

(And faint from hunger didst feel.)"

Thor spake:

63. "Unmanly one, cease, or the mighty hammer,

Mjollnir, shall close thy mouth;

The slayer of Hrungnir shall send thee to hell,

And down to the gate of death."

Loki spake:

64. "'I have said to the gods and the sons of the god,

The things that whetted my thoughts;

But before thee alone do I now go forth,

For thou fightest well, I ween.

65. "Ale hast thou brewed, but, Aegir, now

Such feasts shalt thou make no more;

O'er all that thou hast which is here within

Shall play the flickering flames,

(And thy back shall be burnt with fire.)"

THRYMSKVITHA

The Lay of Thrym

1. Wild was Vingthor when he awoke,

And when his mighty hammer he missed;

He shook his beard, his hair was bristling,

As the son of Jorth about him sought.

2. Hear now the speech that first he spake:

"Harken, Loki, and heed my words,

Nowhere on earth is it known to man,

Nor in heaven above: our hammer is stolen."

3. To the dwelling fair of Freyja went they,

Hear now the speech that first he spake:

"Wilt thou, Freyja, thy feather-dress lend me,

That so my hammer I may seek?"

Freyja spake:

4. "Thine should it be though of silver bright,

And I would give it though 'twere of gold."

Then Loki flew, and the feather-dress whirred,

Till he left behind him the home of the gods,

And reached at last the realm of the giants.

5. Thrym sat on a mound, the giants' master,

Leashes of gold he laid for his dogs,

And stroked and smoothed the manes of his steeds.

Thrym spake:

6. "How fare the gods, how fare the elves?

Why comst thou alone to the giants' land?"

Loki spake:

"III fare the gods, ill fare the elves!

Hast thou hidden Hlorrithi's hammer?"

Thrym spake:

7. "I have hidden Hlorrithi's hammer,

Eight miles down deep in the earth;

And back again shall no man bring it

If Freyja I win not to be my wife."

8. Then Loki flew, and the feather-dress whirred,

Till he left behind him the home of the giants,

And reached at last the realm of the gods.

There in the courtyard Thor he met:

Hear now the speech that first he spake:

9. "Hast thou found tidings as well as trouble?

Thy news in the air shalt thou utter now;

Oft doth the sitter his story forget,

And lies he speaks who lays himself down."

Loki spake:

I0. "Trouble I have, and tidings as well:

Thrym, king of the giants, keeps thy hammer,

And back again shall no man bring it

If Freyja he wins not to be his wife."

11. Freyja the fair then went they to find

Hear now the speech that first he spake:

"Bind on, Freyja, the bridal veil,

For we two must haste to the giants' home."

12. Wrathful was Freyja, and fiercely she snorted,

And the dwelling great of the gods was shaken,

And burst was the mighty Brisings' necklace:

"Most lustful indeed should I look to all

If I journeyed with thee to the giants' home."

13. Then were the gods together met,

And the goddesses came and council held,

And the far-famed ones a plan would find,

How they might Hlorrithi's hammer win.

14. Then Heimdall spake, whitest of the gods,

Like the Wanes he knew the future well:

"Bind we on Thor the bridal veil,

Let him bear the mighty Brisings' necklace;

15. "Keys around him let there rattle,

And down to his knees hang woman's dress;

With gems full broad upon his breast,

And a pretty cap to crown his head."

16. Then Thor the mighty his answer made:

"Me would the gods unmanly call

If I let bind the bridal veil."

17. Then Loki spake, the son of Laufey:

"Be silent, Thor, and speak not thus;

Else will the giants in Asgarth dwell

If thy hammer is brought not home to thee."

8. Then bound they on Thor the bridal veil,

And next the mighty Brisings' necklace.

19. Keys around him let they rattle,

And down to his knees hung woman's dress;

With gems full broad upon his breast,

And a pretty cap to crown his head.

20. Then Loki spake, the son of Laufey:

"As thy maid-servant thither I go with thee;

We two shall haste to the giants' home."

21. Then home the goats to the hall were driven,

They wrenched at the halters, swift were they to run;

The mountains burst, earth burned with fire,

And Othin's son sought Jotunheim.

22. Then loud spake Thrym, the giants' leader:

"Bestir ye, giants, put straw on the benches;

Now Freyja they bring to be my bride,

The daughter of Njorth out of Noatun.

23. "Gold-horned cattle go to my stables,

Jet-black oxen, the giant's joy;

Many my gems, and many my jewels,

Freyja alone did I lack, methinks."

24. Early it was to evening come,

And forth was borne the beer for the giants;

Thor alone ate an ox, and eight salmon,

All the dainties as well that were set for the women;

And drank Sif's mate three tuns of mead.

25. Then loud spake Thrym, the giants' leader:

"Who ever saw bride more keenly bite?

I ne'er saw bride with a broader bite,

Nor a maiden who drank more mead than this!"

26. Hard by there sat the serving-maid wise,

So well she answered the giant's words:

"From food has Freyja eight nights fasted,

So hot was her longing for Jotunheim."

27. Thrym looked 'neath the veil, for he longed to kiss,

But back he leaped the length of the hall:

"Why are so fearful the eyes of Freyja?

Fire, methinks, from her eyes burns forth."

28. Hard by there sat the serving-maid wise,

So well she answered the giant's words:

"No sleep has Freyja for eight nights found,

So hot was her longing for Jotunheim."

29. Soon came the giant's luckless sister,

Who feared not to ask the bridal fee:

"From thy hands the rings of red gold take,

If thou wouldst win my willing love,

(My willing love and welcome glad.)"

30: Then loud spake Thrym, the giants' leader:

"Bring in the hammer to hallow the bride;

On the maiden's knees let Mjollnir lie,

That us both the band of Vor may bless."

31. The heart in the breast of Hlorrithi laughed

When the hard-souled one his hammer beheld;

First Thrym, the king of the giants, he killed,

Then all the folk of the giants he felled.

32. The giant's sister old he slew,

She who had begged the bridal fee;

A stroke she got in the shilling's stead,

And for many rings the might of the hammer.

33. And so his hammer got Othin's son.

ALVISSMOL

The Ballad of Alvis

––––––––

Alvis spake:

1. "Now shall the bride my benches adorn,

And homeward haste forthwith;

Eager for wedlock to all shall I seem,

Nor at home shall they rob me of rest."

Thor spake:

2. "What, pray, art thou? Why so pale round the nose?

By the dead hast thou lain of late?

To a giant like dost thou look, methinks;

Thou wast not born for the bride."

Alvis spake:

3. "Alvis am I, and under the earth

My home 'neath the rocks I have;

With the wagon-guider a word do I seek,

Let the gods their bond not break."

Thor spake:

4. "Break it shall I, for over the bride

Her father has foremost right;

At home was I not when the promise thou hadst,

And I give her alone of the gods."

Alvis spake:

5. "What hero claims such right to hold

O'er the bride that shines so bright?

Not many will know thee, thou wandering man!

Who was bought with rings to bear thee?"

Thor spake:

6. "Vingthor, the wanderer wide, am I,

And I am Sithgrani's son;

Against my will shalt thou get the maid,

And win the marriage word."

Alvis spake:

7. "Thy good-will now shall I quickly get,

And win the marriage word;

I long to have, and I would not lack,

This snow-white maid for mine."

Thor spake:

8. "The love of the maid I may not keep thee

From winning, thou guest so wise,

If of every world thou canst tell me all

That now I wish to know.

9. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the earth, that lies before all,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

10. " 'Earth' to men, 'Field' to the gods it is,

'The Ways' is it called by the Wanes;

'Ever Green' by the giants, 'The Grower' by elves,

'The Moist' by the holy ones high."

Thor spake:

11. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the heaven, beheld of the high one,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

12. " 'Heaven' men call it, 'The Height' the gods,

The Wanes 'The Weaver of Winds';

Giants 'The Up-World,' elves 'The Fair-Roof,'

The dwarfs 'The Dripping Hall.'"

Thor spake:

13. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the moon, that men behold,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

14. "'Moon' with men, 'Flame' the gods among,

'The Wheel' in the house of hell;

'The Goer' the giants, 'The Gleamer' the dwarfs,

The elves 'The Teller of Time."

Thor spake:

15. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the sun, that all men see,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

16. "Men call it 'Sun,' gods 'Orb of the Sun,'

'The Deceiver of Dvalin' the dwarfs;

The giants 'The Ever-Bright,' elves 'Fair Wheel,'

'All-Glowing' the sons of the gods."

Thor spake:

17. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the clouds, that keep the rains,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

18. "'Clouds' men name them, 'Rain-Hope' gods call them,

The Wanes call them 'Kites of the Wind';

'Water-Hope' giants, 'Weather-Might' elves,

'The Helmet of Secrets' in hell."

Thor spake:

19. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the wind, that widest fares,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

20. "'Wind' do men call it, the gods 'The Waverer,'

'The Neigher' the holy ones high;

'The Wailer' the giants, 'Roaring Wender' the elves,

In hell 'The Blustering Blast.'

Thor spake:

21. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the calm, that quiet lies,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

22. " 'Calm' men call it, 'The Quiet' the gods,

The Wanes 'The Hush of the Winds';

'The Sultry' the giants, elves 'Day's Stillness,'

The dwarfs 'The Shelter of Day.'

Thor spake:

23. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the sea, whereon men sail,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

24. " 'Sea' men call it, gods 'The Smooth-Lying,'

'The Wave' is it called by the Wanes;

'Eel-Home' the giants, | 'Drink-Stuff' the elves,

For the dwarfs its name is 'The Deep.'

Thor spake:

25. "Answer me, Alvis! | thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the fire, | that flames for men,

In each of all the worlds?"

Alvis spake:

26. " 'Fire' men call it, and 'Flame' the gods,

By the Wanes is it 'Wildfire' called;

'The Biter' by giants, 'The Burner' by dwarfs,

'The Swift' in the house of hell."

Thor spake:

27. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the wood, that grows for mankind,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

28. "Men call it 'The Wood, gods 'The Mane of the Field,'

'Seaweed of Hills' in hell;

'Flame-Food' the giants, 'Fair-Limbed' the elves,

'The Wand' is it called by the Wanes."

Thor spake:

29. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the night, the daughter of Nor,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

30. "'Night' men call it, 'Darkness' gods name it,

'The Hood' the holy ones high;

The giants 'The Lightless,' the elves 'Sleep's joy"

The dwarfs 'The Weaver of Dreams."'

Thor spake:

31. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the seed, that is sown by men,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

32. "Men call it 'Grain,' and 'Corn' the gods,

'Growth' in the world of the Wanes;

'The Eaten' by giants, 'Drink-Stuff' by elves,

In hell 'The Slender Stem.'

Thor spake:

33. "Answer me, Alvis! thou knowest all,

Dwarf, of the doom of men:

What call they the ale, that is quaffed of men,

In each and every world?"

Alvis spake:

34. "'Ale' among men, 'Beer' the gods among,

In the world of the Wanes 'The Foaming';

'Bright Draught' with giants, 'Mead' with dwellers in hell,

'The Feast-Draught' with Suttung's sons."

Thor spake:

"In a single breast I never have seen

More wealth of wisdom old;

But with treacherous wiles must I now betray thee:

The day has caught thee, dwarf!

(Now the sun shines here in the hall.)"

BALDRS DRAUMAR

Baldr's Dreams

1. Once were the gods together met,

And the goddesses came and council held,

And the far-famed ones the truth would find,

Why baleful dreams to Baldr had come.

2. Then Othin rose, the enchanter old,

And the saddle he laid on Sleipnir's back;

Thence rode he down to Niflhel deep,

And the hound he met that came from hell.

3. Bloody he was on his breast before,

At the father of magic he howled from afar;

Forward rode Othin, the earth resounded

Till the house so high of Hel he reached.

4. Then Othin rode to the eastern door,

There, he knew well, was the wise-woman's grave;

Magic he spoke and mighty charms,

Till spell-bound she rose, and in death she spoke:

5. "What is the man, to me unknown,

That has made me travel the troublous road?

I was snowed on with snow, and smitten with rain,

And drenched with dew; long was I dead."

Othin spake:

6. "Vegtam my name, I am Valtam's son;

Speak thou of hell, for of heaven I know:

For whom are the benches bright with rings,

And the platforms gay bedecked with gold?"

The Wise-Woman spake:

7. "Here for Baldr the mead is brewed,

The shining drink, and a shield lies o'er it;

But their hope is gone from the mighty gods.

Unwilling I spake, and now would be still."

Othin spake:

8. "Wise-woman, cease not! I seek from thee

All to know that I fain would ask:

Who shall the bane of Baldr become,

And steal the life from Othin's son?"

The Wise-Woman spake:

9. "Hoth thither bears the far-famed branch,

He shall the bane of Baldr become,

And steal the life from Othin's son.

Unwilling I spake, and now would be still."

Othin spake:

10. "Wise-woman, cease not! I seek from thee

All to know that I fain would ask:

Who shall vengeance win for the evil work,

Or bring to the flames the slayer of Baldr?"

The Wise-Woman spake:

11. "Rind bears Vali in Vestrsalir,

And one night old fights Othin's son;

His hands he shall wash not, his hair he shall comb not,

Till the slayer of Baldr he brings to the flames.

Unwilling I spake, and now would be still."

Othin spake:

12. "Wise-woman, cease not! I seek from thee

All to know that I fain would ask:

What maidens are they who then shall weep,

And toss to the sky the yards of the sails?"

The Wise-Woman spake:

13. "Vegtam thou art not, as erstwhile I thought;

Othin thou art, the enchanter old."

Othin spake:

"No wise-woman art thou, nor wisdom hast;

Of giants three the mother art thou."

The Wise-Woman spake:

14. "Home ride, Othin, be ever proud;

For no one of men shall seek me more

Till Loki wanders loose from his bonds,

And to the last strife the destroyers come."

RIGSTHULA

The Song of Rig

1. Men say there went by ways so green

Of old the god, the aged and wise,

Mighty and strong did Rig go striding.

2. Forward he went on the midmost way,

He came to a dwelling, a door on its posts;

In did he fare, on the floor was a fire,

Two hoary ones by the hearth there sat,

Ai and Edda, in olden dress.

3. Rig knew well wise words to speak,

Soon in the midst of the room he sat,

And on either side the others were.

4. A loaf of bread did Edda bring,

Heavy and thick and swollen with husks;

Forth on the table she set the fare,

And broth for the meal in a bowl there was.

(Calf's flesh boiled was the best of the dainties.)

5. Rig knew well wise words to speak,

Thence did he rise, made ready to sleep;

Soon in the bed himself did he lay,

And on either side the others were.

––––––––

6. Thus was he there for three nights long,

Then forward he went on the midmost way,

And so nine months were soon passed by.

7. A son bore Edda, with water they sprinkled him,

With a cloth his hair so black they covered;

Thraell they named him....

8. The skin was wrinkled and rough on his hands,

Knotted his knuckles...

Thick his fingers, and ugly his face,

Twisted his back, and big his heels.

9. He began to grow, and to gain in strength,

Soon of his might good use he made;

With bast he bound, and burdens carried,

Home bore faggots the whole day long.

10. One came to their home, crooked her legs,

Stained were her feet, and sunburned her arms,

Flat was her nose; her name was Thir.

11. Soon in the midst of the room she sat,

By her side there sat the son of the house;

They whispered both, and the bed made ready,

Thraell and Thir, till the day was through.

12. Children they had, they lived and were happy,

Fjosnir and Klur they were called, methinks,

Hreim and Kleggi, Kefsir, Fulnir,

Drumb, Digraldi, Drott and Leggjaldi,

Lut and Hosvir; the house they cared for,

Ground they dunged, and swine they guarded,

Goats they tended, and turf they dug.

13. Daughters had they, Drumba and Kumba,

Okkvinkalfa, Arinnefla,

Ysja and Ambott, Eikintjasna,

Totrughypja and Tronubeina;

And thence has risen the race of thralls.

14. Forward went Rig, his road was straight,

To a hall he came, and a door there hung;

In did he fare, on the floor was a fire:

Afi and Amma owned the house.

15. There sat the twain, and worked at their tasks:

The man hewed wood for the weaver's beam;

His beard was trimmed, o'er his brow a curl,

His clothes fitted close; in the corner a chest.

16. The woman sat and the distaff wielded,

At the weaving with arms outstretched she worked;

On her head was a band, on her breast a smock;

On her shoulders a kerchief with clasps there was.

17. Rig knew well wise words to speak,

Soon in the midst of the room he sat,

And on either side the others were.

18. Then took Amma....

The vessels full with the fare she set,

Calf's flesh boiled was the best of the dainties.

19. Rig knew well wise words to speak,

He rose from the board, made ready to sleep;

Soon in the bed himself did he lay,

And on either side the others were.

20. Thus was he there for three nights long,

Then forward he went on the midmost way,

And so nine months were soon passed by.

21. A son bore Amma, with water they sprinkled him,

Karl they named him; in a cloth she wrapped him,

He was ruddy of face, and flashing his eyes.

22. He began to grow, and to gain in strength,

Oxen he ruled, and plows made ready,

Houses he built, and barns he fashioned,

Carts he made, and the plow he managed.

23. Home did they bring the bride for Karl,

In goatskins clad, and keys she bore;

Snor was her name, 'neath the veil she sat;