Running Until You're 100 - Jeff Galloway - ebook

Running Until You're 100 ebook

Jeff Galloway

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Opis

Running Until You're 100 is the must-have guide that will keep runners fit as they age and help them run for life. Using Jeff Galloway's proven Run Walk Run® method, this book offers step-by-step programs for runners in their 40s, 50s, 60s, and 70s. These programs make the needed adjustments for each decade, which means the runner can enjoy exercise and enhance life without injury. Also included is advice on nutrition and fat-burning as well as how to determine current fitness level, set appropriate goals, and stay injury free. Using these run–walk, low-mileage programs will benefit the bones, joints, and heart, and most runners are able to enjoy running with fewer aches and pains. With this book, anyone can run until they're 100!

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The contents of this book were carefully researched. However, all information is supplied without liability. Neither the authors nor the publisher will be liable for possible disadvantages or damages resulting from this book.

JEFF GALLOWAY

RUNNING

UNTIL

YOU’RE 100

A GUIDE TO LIFELONG RUNNING

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

Running Until You’re 100

Maidenhead: Meyer & Meyer Sport (UK) Ltd., 2019

ISBN: 9781782558149

All rights reserved, especially the right to copy and distribute, including translation rights. No part of this work may be reproduced–including by photocopy, microfilm or any other means–processed, stored electronically, copied or distributed in any form whatsoever without the written permission of the publisher.

© 2019 by Meyer & Meyer Sport (UK) Ltd.5th edition 2019, 4th edition 2011

Aachen, Auckland, Beirut, Cairo, Cape Town, Dubai, Hägendorf, Hong Kong, Indianapolis, Manila, New Delhi, Singapore, Sydney, Tehran, Vienna

Member of the World Sport Publishers’ Association (WSPA)

ISBN: 9781782558149eISBN: 9781782554776Email: [email protected]

CONTENTS

DEDICATION

1HOW ACTIVE DO YOU WANT TO BE?

2IF YOU DON’T GIVE UP…YOU WIN!

3WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH SAY?

4HOW TO RUN BETTER AS YOU GET OLDER

5MAJOR DIFFERENCES AS YOU GET OLDER

6GOALS AND PRIORITIES

7HEALTH ALERT

8THE GALLOWAY RUN-WALK-RUN METHOD

9WHAT PACE IS RIGHT FOR ME…TODAY?

10MATURE RUNNER’S CHECKLIST

11PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPROVEMENTS OCCUR AT ANY AGE

12LONG RUN, HILLS, AND REGULARITY–THE KEY ELEMENTS

13MATURE AND FASTER

14THE DRILLS TO MAKE RUNNING FASTER AND EASIER

15YOUR JOURNAL FOR PLANNING, EVALUATION, AND MOTIVATION

16THE PRINCIPLES OF GREAT RUNNING FORM

17MENTAL TOUGHNESS

18MASTERING SPORTS NUTRITION: TIPS FOR AGING RUNNERS BY NANCY CLARK, MS, RD

19SHOULD WE TAKE VITAMINS?

20WHY DOES YOUR BODY WANT TO HOLD ON TO FAT?

21HOW TO BURN MORE FAT?

22FAT-BURNING TRAINING: FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE

23CONTROLLING THE INCOME SIDE OF THE FAT EQUATION

25CROSS TRAINING: GETTING BETTER AS YOU REST THE LEGS

26HEART RATE MONITORS AND GPS DEVICES

27DEALING WITH THE HEAT

28TROUBLESHOOTING PERFORMANCE

29PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

30INJURY TROUBLESHOOTING

31CHOOSING THE BEST SHOE FOR YOU

32THE CLOTHING THERMOMETER

33PRODUCTS THAT ENHANCE RUNNING

34PRIME TRAINING ELEMENTS

DEDICATION

At the age of 81, Kitty entered the Peachtree (10K) road race. One year before, she finished with no major problems, but things had changed. Though she never smoked, a tumor was discovered in the sensitive bronchial passages near her heart—and it was inoperable.

While her doctor was OK with her decision to race, I asked her several times whether she should challenge herself on a hilly 6-mile course in hot Atlanta, GA, on July 4th. She didn’t argue with me, but in her quiet way, I could tell that my questions only magnified her determination. One of the primary reasons, however, may be the result of having grown up during the great depression. She couldn’t get a refund on the entry fee and was determined to get her money’s worth.

I believe that Kitty would have had no major problems if the temperature had remained as it was at the start—60 degrees Fahrenheit. Unfortunately, she was in the last group starting much later, and the temperature increased every few minutes. She knew she was in trouble at 3 miles (over 80°F with high humidity) but struggled up Cardiac hill past the 4-mile mark when there seemed to be nothing left in the tank.

A few minutes later, the City of Atlanta street sweeper approached. Most Peachtree participants know and fear the “grim sweeper” because when it catches you, your race is over. Kitty didn’t care because she had been physically spent for 30 minutes.

This time, the sweeper stopped. Kitty motioned for the driver to move on. He stuck his head out the window and told her that she was just as important as any other runner in the race, and that he was going to stay behind her until she finished. That’s all she needed. It was a real struggle but you wouldn’t have known it as she somehow found a spring in her step, crossing the 6.2-mile mark with her head held high.

Kitty Galloway taught me, by example, the principles that are the foundation of my life: never give up, take control over each day, confront every challenge, and do your best. She crossed her final finish line about 18 months after her last Peachtree—mentally sharp, with her head held high. She was my mom and my hero.

CHAPTER 1

HOW ACTIVE DO YOU WANT TO BE?

I BELIEVE THAT WHEN RUNNING IS BALANCED WITH REST IT…

Delivers the best attitude boost you can get

Produces enhanced vitality that lasts all day

Is the best stress reducer

Bestows a significant sense of achievement

Raises your body’s physical performance capability

Blends body, mind, and spirit better than any activity

Bestows benefits that improve life in many unique ways

If exercise were a controlled medication, it would be the most heavily prescribed on record. If running were a drug to combat depression and increase vitality, it would be a blockbuster. The benefits from exercise are almost limitless, and there seems to be no activity that maximizes these than does running.

Running stimulates your body to improve overall physical and mental capacity. Research indicates that significant exertion each week can extend the length of your life. The increased endurance and physical capacity gained from years of running results in a more active lifestyle to the end of your days.

By balancing stress and rest, walking and running, nutrition and exercise, everyone can gain a great deal of control over how much vitality will be experienced later in life. The purpose of this book is not merely to help you move down the road or trail until you’re 100. Inside, you’ll also find practical tips about how to make adjustments so that you can enjoy every run.

In the next few chapters, you’ll see what the research says about running and the aging process—lots of good news. While it’s a fact that our body resources are reduced year by year, I’ve heard from thousands of runners who’ve added more rest and inserted more frequent walk breaks into their runs. The results are almost magical: a high quality of running and life into their 60s, 70s, and 80s.

We don’t know the year we will leave this earth. But, if you mentally project yourself running until the century mark, and make the right adjustments, you’ll expect and achieve more vitality during every decade of your life. Positive mental visions, with the use of the following tools, can give you a major amount of control over your energy and health.

In the next chapter, you’ll read about some inspiring individuals who’ve confronted the never-ending challenges of living and exercising past the ages of 70, 80, and 90. There is something in the human spirit that is positively engaged by good examples, and you’ll find more at the finish line of practically every running event.

If there’s one training component in the book that helps more than any other it is my Run Walk Run® method, which is referenced throughout this book. I’ve now heard from thousands of the “over 50” crowd who’ve returned to enjoyable running by using this method. Some have improved their finish times significantly by inserting walk breaks. There’s no doubt that this method prolongs your running life.

There are many suggestions in this book that have helped thousands to experience the joy and sense of freedom that only running delivers into the latter stages of life. I want you to take control of your running enjoyment and fatigue while staying injury free. I offer this advice after working with more than 200,000 runners, over more than 30 years of coaching. So lace up your running shoes and join the growing number of runners past the age of 60, 80, and beyond who enjoy running as much as those in their 20s.

CHAPTER 2

IF YOU DON’T GIVE UP…YOU WIN!

A few years ago, I met a 93-year-old runner who ran in the popular Crim 10-mile race in Flint, MI. He was just as excited about the race as the 20-year-olds, and more mentally sharp than some of the younger runners as he talked about it. A recent news clipping showed a 101-year-old man running in a veteran’s track meet. He set a world record. In fact, there are many opportunities for setting records if you’ll keep running until 100.

Unfortunately many people over the age of 50 believe that they cannot, or should not, increase their level of exercise. A high percentage believes that it is not possible for those over 60 to go from a very sedentary lifestyle into training for a distance event. My dear mom (see the dedication of this book) initially felt this way—but turned things around and inspired me. In this chapter you’ll meet some “ordinary people” who have pushed back traditional limits and expectations. They will be the first to tell you to stay in touch with your doctor from the start of the fitness journey.

RUNNING WITH CANCER

“If I had to choose between my old pre-cancer life as a somewhat depressed, overweight, unmotivated and unfulfilled couch potato and my current life with cancer it’s easy. I’m energetic, happy, motivated and love life each day.” –Lee Kilpack

In 1996 Lee Kilpack was diagnosed with breast cancer with lymph node involvement. She began a treatment plan of surgery, chemo, and radiation. Lee had never exercised. The diagnosis was a shock to her spirit, and the treatment tested body, mind, and willpower.

By 2000, things weren’t looking very good, and she felt bad most of the time. Then, one morning, she woke up with the desire to start taking care of her body. She hired a personal trainer that day. By 2001, she was walking every day. Later that year she had inserted some running into the walks. In 2002, Lee walked the 3-Day/60 Mile Breast Cancer Walk and raised $3,000 for the cause.

The training for and the completion of such a strenuous event produced a big letdown in motivation, with extended recovery from injuries, aches, and pains. Lee struggled, and finally started running regularly in December of 2003. After the 2004 New Year, Lee set a bigger goal—to finish a marathon in November. The training program she chose was too adverse and she became injured in September. She didn’t give up.

In early 2005, her doctor cleared her to start running again. She picked my more conservative training program. I worked with Lee via email and often found it hard to hold back her energy and drive. The training for the Marine Corps Marathon was more of a challenge than for most because she relocated to the Gulf Coast to volunteer for relief efforts for Hurricane Katrina—squeezing in long runs after exhausting days. Somehow, she also hikes, cycles, and paddles hard in her kayak; on the “off days” she doesn’t run.

She regularly gets screened for tumor markers. While the tests show her out of the normal range, her doctor does not see a threat in the near future, and supports her running. “I don’t know what the future holds for me. If it is metastasis tomorrow, I would be OK with that. What a good life I’ve been given. My health and happiness have never been better. What my oncologist doesn’t understand is what a dynamite combo vitality and endorphins make.”

Lee is training for three half marathons and three marathons in the next year. “I am so thankful for my cancer. My life has been changed for the better and I can’t express how great I feel now. If I had to choose between my old pre-cancer life as a somewhat depressed, overweight, unmotivated and unfulfilled couch potato and my current life with cancer it’s easy. I’m energetic, happy, motivated and love life each day. I love my body, my running—life itself.”

A TURNAROUND IN HER 50S

Over a decade ago, Cathy Troisi patiently listened through most of the sessions of a one-day running school I conducted in Boston. I noticed a change in her energy level and attentiveness when I got into the part about my Run Walk Run method. Cathy had never run before, wanted to do the Boston Marathon for a charity, and thought she had waited too long to start running. Even veteran runners told her that running would hurt her joints past the age of 50.

Walk breaks gave her hope. She called me six months later, gushing with the excitement of finishing her first marathon. The excitement has not gone away.

Lifestyle before running: no physical activity, ever (except gym class in high school)

First marathon: 6 hours, using a ratio of run 1 minute/walk 1 minute

12 years later: 321 marathons, 83 ultra marathons…and counting.

$ raised for charity in 24 years: over $192,761

CHALLENGES:

Caring for family

Owner of two pre-schools

After losing her daughter to cancer, Cathy has cared for her and the grandkids

Hereditary high level of cholesterol

WHAT RUNNING HAS DONE FOR HER:

Appreciation of health potential, human performance potential, and to not take health for granted

More conscious of diet

“I’ve never felt my age (now, over 60)”

Social camaraderie across 50 states

Enriching travel experiences—shared

Positive mental outlook and attitude especially when challenged

Wonderful new friends

A chance to volunteer—give back

“Running is a panacea for a healthy life: physically, mentally, emotionally. Aging can be a healthier process due to this simple activity. It requires minimal equipment, allows time for reflection, provides an opportunity to get in touch with nature, incurs minimal cost, and breaks down age barriers.” –Cathy Troisi

A FASTER MARATHON AT AGE 62

It was a treasure for me to know the late Dr. George Sheehan as a friend. He was not only a great ambassador of running, but also a fierce competitor to the end. Just before he turned 60 years old, George’s marathon times were slowing down, and he made a decision to go into “semi-running-retirement.” Instead of running 5 miles every day, he ran 10 miles every other day. Due to the quality rest, and his continued focus, the great Sheehan ran the fastest marathon of his life at age 62: 3 hours and 1 minute.

MARATHON RECORDS AFTER 80

Mavis Lindgren was a sickly child and a sickly adult who was advised against exercising. She almost died of a lung infection in her late 50s. During the recovery, her new young doctor had the shocking opinion that she should walk with her husband and kept recommending an increase in the distance she covered.

Surprisingly, Mavis found enjoyment as she felt her body come alive with improved endurance. In her 60s, she took up running with husband Carl and quickly surpassed him. Into her late 80s she was setting age group records and had not even suffered a common cold since beginning her running career.

At about the age of 85 she slipped on a cup at the 20 mile water station of the Portland (OR) Marathon. Officials helped her up and tried to take her to a medical tent. She quietly brushed them off, saying that it was a surface injury. After she finished she went to the medical tent to find that she had been running with a broken arm.

We miss Mavis, but her pleasant, positive, quiet, and tough spirit lives on.

RUNNING WITH ONLY ONE FOOT

When you start feeling sorry for yourself because your feet hurt or your legs don’t have the bounce of past years, think of Kelly Luckett. Kelly lost her leg at age 2 and disconnected with the thought of regular exercise or sports. As a sedentary spouse, she watched her husband become a runner, and for years participated in Atlanta’s Peachtree Road Race, which had a wheel chair division. Kelly had used a prosthetic for years, but thought that regular exercise was out of her range of possibilities.

In 2003, she decided to enter the Peachtree race herself and started walking. She overcame many unique problems relating to the mechanics of the device and made adjustments. Since the Peachtree is listed as a running race, Kelly tried to run, but could only last for 30 seconds. She gave up many times—restarting each time.

Slowly, she made progress, adjusting the equipment, the urethane liner, and foot gear. She made it through her first Peachtree, along with 55,000 others. She couldn’t imagine running much farther than 6 miles until she attended one of my one-day running schools and learned about the Run Walk Run method. We stayed in touch for the next year, fine-tuning her training and her run-walk-run ratio. I have not coached an athlete with a stronger spirit.

Her first half marathon was tough and she told me that she couldn’t imagine going twice that distance at any speed. Over the next six months, we kept adjusting the run-walk-run ratio, and Kelly finished the Country Music Marathon in 6 hours and 46 minutes. She passed a number of runners in the last 10 miles and qualified for the world’s most famous race: the Boston Marathon.

Kelly was only the third female amputee to finish this premier race. Her training paid off and she improved her time by almost 20 minutes! The next challenge is a 50-miler.

© Jeff Galloway

DON MCNELLY FINISHED THE “MARATHON OF LIFE” WITH VITALITY AND A GREAT ATTITUDE AT 96 YEARS YOUNG

a.744 marathons

b.Weight: 210

c.Height: 6’ 1/4”

d.Started running at age 48

e.First Marathon 1969—Boston

f.Over 400 marathons since turning 70

g.Completing over 25 marathons each year throughout his 70s and 80s

h.Married for over 64 years

i.“I’ve never been happier in my life.”

Those who met Don found that he did not act his age. Here is how a friend described him during his later years: “…an enormous amount of energy, clear head, speaks intellectually about all topics, and has no signs of hearing, sight or recollection problems.” He started running at age 48, and ran his first marathon almost 10 years later in 1969—the last Boston Marathon that did not require time qualification.

Don told me that his non-running friends thought he was genetically gifted with strong knees and hips, but that wasn‘t so. Both sedentary sedentary parents had to have both hips replaced. Into his 90s, he kept moving and had no orthopedic issues.

NORM FRANK — 74 YEARS YOUNG IN 2006

a.900 marathons

b.He’s still running all of his marathons

c.Lives in Rochester, NY, and New Port Richey, FL

d.Current goal: to reach 1,000

e.Norm’s PR in his younger days was about 3:30. He ran 30 consecutive Boston marathons.

f.He completed a marathon in each of the 50 States. He’s a retired lawn maintenance company owner.

WALLY HERMAN — 81 YEARS YOUNG IN 2006

a.Approaching 700 marathons

b.Still runs his marathons

c.Lives in Ottawa, Canada, and Lake Worth, FL

d.He’s finished a marathon in 99 different countries.

e.Observers say he can run under 5 hours on a good day.

MY LONG-TERM HERO

Throughout my childhood, I was an overweight, sedentary kid. But like many boys, I wanted to be like my dad, who had been an all-state football player. I tried his sport in the 8th grade, but it wasn’t the right one for me. My dad sensed that running cross-country would be a better match, and he was right.

As I got in better shape through high school and college, the fat burned off my body. At the same time, my father was putting it on and becoming more sedentary. What bothered me most was his increasingly more negative attitude. Intuitively, I knew that exercise would help him feel better. When Aerobics was published by Dr. Kenneth Cooper in 1968, I gave a copy to dad, which he read completely in a day or so, but didn’t leave his chair. I offered to walk with him around the park in front of his office, but he complained about the complications of varicose veins and allergies, and I didn’t know enough about either condition to argue with him.

It was a high school reunion, at the age of 52, which provided the wakeup call. Out of 25 boys who had been on the Moultrie High football team, 13 had died of lifestyle degenerative diseases. During the three-and-a-half hour drive home, Elliott Galloway realized that if he didn’t make some healthy behavioral changes, he would not be attending the next reunion.

The next day, he decided to run around the golf course in front of his office. Less than a football field later, his legs gave out. The feeling of defeat drove him to try for an additional telephone pole two days later. About a year later, Elliott Galloway’s name was in the finisher’s list of the Peachtree Road Race 10K. Seven years later, and 55 pounds lighter, he was running marathons—including one below 3 hours. The effects of varicose veins and allergies almost went away as he got into regular running.

Having had an irregular heart rhythm for years, his doctor ordered him, at age 75, to retire from long-distance racing. But he negotiated and received clearance to finish his career with the 100th running of the Boston Marathon in 1996. I was honored to be his pacer, and as we ran and walk-breaked our way from Hopkinton into Boston, we talked about the history, the marathon memories, and were energized by the crowds.

As we turned the corner and saw the finish structure, Dad took off. Once he saw the clock, he was on a mission to break a certain time barrier, which we did: 5:59:48. He told anyone who asked about the race that he would have run much faster if I hadn’t slowed him down. I didn’t argue.

As my dad‘s life clock ticked toward the 90-year mark, he faced the daily challenges of macular degeneration and poor hearing. An even greater stress was the loss of my dear mother, after having been married for 63 years. But practically every day, he was on a mission to see more than 10,000 steps on his counter. When things were really tough, Dad and I hit the road, moving our legs over the same course he used when he started—one telephone pole at a time.

He is my hero. I hope I can be like him when I grow up.

CHAPTER 3

WHAT DOES THE RESEARCH SAY?

“For every hour you exercise, you should receive two hours added to your lifespan.”

The evidence is growing that running and walking will bring quality to your life, increase longevity, and will not harm your joints—when done correctly. But every year I hear statements from uninformed doctors who are prejudiced against running, don’t read the research, and who mistakenly maintain that humans were not designed for running. This chapter is your guide to the research, so that you can decide.

It’s my opinion, and that of many medical experts, that most people will maintain their cardiovascular system better and suffer less joint damage by regularly and gently running and walking. During a clinic on his research findings (following), leading researcher Dr. Paffenbarger stated that for every hour you exercise, you can expect to have your life extended by two hours. Research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2017 concluded that for every hour run, life expectancy average would increase by seven hours. That’s a great return on investment!

But those who choose to push into speed work and run too much or too fast for their current ability can cause orthopedic problems. Because there are many individual differences, especially during the aging process, you should find the medical experts in the areas that are important to you, and stay in touch about any problems that come up. You’ll find suggestions in this book about “early warning” tests that can show potential problems, and how to choose doctors who are supportive of running and exercise. Consult your medical team on all medical issues.

Humans were designed for long-distance running—and walking. In the journal Nature, November 2004, Daniel Lieberman (Harvard) and Dennis Bramble (University of Utah) state that fossil evidence shows that ancient man ran long distances. These experts and others point to the ancient biomechanisms of the ankle, achilles, buttocks, and many other components which are running-specific adaptations. According to the extensive research of these scientists and others, one can say that humans were born to run, that covering long distances was a survival activity, and that body and mind are designed to adapt to gentle and regular walking/running. Some experts believe that ancient human ancestors ran before they walked.

Older runners can improve faster than younger runners. “You can maintain a very high performance standard into the sixth or seventh decade of life,” said Dr. Peter Jokl, British Journal of Sports Medicine, August 2004 (reported in MSNBC.com). This study found that runners over 50 years old improved their times in the NYC Marathon more than runners in younger age groups.

EXERCISE PROLONGS LIFE

Living longer is related to the number of calories burned per week. Dr. Ralph Paffenbarger conducted a highly acclaimed and comprehensive study for the US Public Health Service, begun in the 1960s. Results have been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, April 1995 (co-authored by Doctors Lee and Hsieh). The conclusion: as the amount of exercise increases, rates of death from all major causes are reduced. Those who exercise more can statistically predict that they will live longer than they would when sedentary or with minimal exertion. His extensive research has also shown that the more calories burned, the greater the benefit.

Starting exercise after the age of 60 can lengthen life. Dr. Kenneth Cooper, founder and director of the Cooper Clinic and the Cooper Institute of Aerobic Research, has volumes of research on various aspects of this topic. Findings also reveal that men of all ages who exercise regularly experience a 60% reduction in heart attacks, while women show a 40% reduction.

Breast cancer reduced in females who regularly exercised during the childbearing years. This was reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Older runners reduced their risk of heart disease as they increased weekly mileage. Research in the National Runners Health Study shows that as runners increase their weekly mileage, they experience a reduced ratio of total cholesterol to the “bad” LDL cholesterol. Higher mileage runners also tend to reduce systolic blood pressure, while cutting down on waist and hip fat. The reduction in LDL among those running 40-plus miles per week represents a 29-30% reduction in heart attack risk.

Exercise reduced death rate in women. This was the conclusion by Lissner et al, in the American Journal of Epidemiology (Jan 1996), from an extensive study of Swedish women. The researchers also found that reducing physical activity increased risk of death.

Sherman et al found that the most active women exercisers cut their death rate by one third (American Heart Journal, Nov 1994).

Colon cancer and GI hemorrhage decreased by regular exercise. Several studies show a 30% reduction of colon cancer among regular exercisers. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage research is reported by Pahor et al (JAMA Aug 1994).

Better thinking. Spirduso (Physical Fitness, Aging, and Psychomotor Speed: a review in Journal of Gerontology 1980) found that those who regularly exercised performed better on tests of cognitive functioning.

Less depression, better attitude. Eysenck et al (Adv Behav Res Ther 1982) found that active folks were more likely to be better adjusted compared with sedentary individuals. Folkins et al (American Journal of Psychology 1981) showed that exercise improves self-confidence and self-esteem. Weyerer et al reported that patients who exercised and were given counseling did better than with counseling alone (Sports Medicine, Feb 1994). Blumenthal et al (Journal of Gerontology 1989) found that exercise training reduces depression in healthy older men, and Martinsen et al (British Medical Journal 1985) found exercise very effective in populations with major depression. Camancho et al (American Journal of Epidemiology 1991) found that newcomers to exercise were at no greater risk for depression than those who had exercised regularly.

RUNNING AND JOINT HEALTH

Running does not predispose joints to arthritis. Dan Wnorowski, MD, has written a paper which reviews research on the effects of running and joint health. He believes that the majority of the relevant literature during past decades on this topic finds little or no basis that running increases arthritis risk. Wnorowski goes on to say that a MRI study indicates that the prevalence of knee meniscus abnormalities in asymptomatic marathon runners is no different than sedentary controls.

“Studies have shown that joint nourishment is entirely based upon keeping joints in motion.” –Charles Jung, MD from Group Health Cooperative website

“We don’t see marathon runners having more joint injuries than sedentary folks. Simply put, active people have less joint injury.” –P.Z. Pearce, MD, from Group Health Cooperative website

“Running offers up to 12 years of protection from onset of osteoarthritis.” –BBC website, 16 Oct 2002

“Painless running or other activities which are aerobic and make you fit help keep you vigorous for longer.” –Professor Jim Fries, Stanford University (commenting upon results of his research at Stanford on aging exercisers)

“Inactivity was once thought to prevent arthritis and protect fragile arthritic joints from further damage. More recent research has demonstrated the opposite.” –Benjamin Ebert, MD, Ph.D., as quoted on Dr. Larry Smith’s website

“The notion that sports and recreational activities cause an inevitable wear on the joints just does not hold up when the scientific studies are evaluated. Few competitive or recreational long-distance runners suffer severe joint injuries and many regular runners can recall how long and how often they have run.” –Ross Hauser, M.D, and Marion Hauser M.S.R.D. as quoted on Dr. Larry Smith’s website.

Older runners reported pain and disability only 25% as often as those who didn’t run. A study conducted by Fries, et al.