Professional Practice for Interior Designers - Christine M. Piotrowski - ebook

Professional Practice for Interior Designers ebook

Christine M. Piotrowski

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Opis

This updated edition of the most comprehensive business guide for designers covers the interior design profession in a clear and well-organized style. From establishing a practice to managing a project, the reader progresses through all aspects of the business, whether in a small or large firm. The new edition includes additional information on ethics, as well as a companion website containing sample forms and other resources. This book is recommended by the NCIDQ as preparation for their professional registration examination.

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CONTENTS

Preface

Acknowledgments

Chapter 1: Interior Design as a Profession

Why Study Professional Practice?

Defining the Profession

What Is a Profession?

Professional Responsibility in a Changing World

Historical Overview

Interior Design Divisions

Interior Design Value

The Business of Interior Design

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

Key Names

Organizations

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 2: Professional Advancement

Educational Preparation

Internships

Lifelong Learning

NCIDQ Examination

Licensing and Registration

Professional Associations

Social Responsibility

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

Organizations

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 3: Ethics and Professional Conduct

Ethical Standards

Ethics in the Business Environment

Professional Conduct

Disciplinary Procedures

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 4: Legal Responsibilities

The Legal Environment of Interior Design Practice

Criminal versus Tort Law

Negligence

Intentional Torts

Intellectual Property—Copyright

Code Compliance

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 5: Where Do Designers Work?

How Do Designers Work?

Global Design Work

Types of Work Environments

Expectations

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Reference

Chapter 6: Project Compensation and Design Fees

Calculating the Billing Rate

Which Compensation Method?

Estimating Design Fees

Indirect Job Costs

Methods for Setting Design Fees

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Chapter 7: Preparing Design Contracts

Definition and Basic Elements of a Contract

Letter of Agreement or Contract?

Proposals versus Contracts

Contract Form and the Statute of Frauds

Developing the Design Contract

Content Formalities

Interior Design Contracts: Content and Form

Performance and Breach

Termination by Agreement

Avoiding Contract Disputes

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 8: Product Pricing

Catalog Pricing

Pricing Terms

Discounts

Selling Prices

Deposits, Down Payments, and Retainers

Freight and FOB

Delivery and Installation Charges

Sales and Use Taxes

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 9: The Selling of Goods: The Uniform Commercial Code and Warranties

Historic Overview of the UCC

UCC Definitions

The Buyer’s Rights and Obligations

The Seller’s Rights and Obligations

Statute of Frauds

The Sales Contract

Electronic Agreements and Signatures

Sales on Approval

Title

Risk

Warranties and Product Liability

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 10: Trade Sources

Manufacturers

Sales Representatives

Marts, Showrooms, and Market Centers

Local Showrooms

Retail Specialty Stores

Manufacturer’s Dealers

Internet Sourcing

Tradespeople and Craftspeople

Construction Contractors

Selecting Trade Sources

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Chapter 11: The Project Management Process

What Is Project Management?

The Role of the Designer/Specifier

Bringing Value to Clients through Design

Phases of an Interior Design Project

Project Delivery Methods

Stakeholders

Selecting Project Teams

Plan Review Boards

Project Schedules

Project Budgeting

Managing and Recording Your Time

Project Files or Job Books

Building Information Modeling (BIM)

Value Engineering

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 12: Contract Documents and Specifications

Contract Documents

Specifications

Specifications Organization

Sustainable Product Specifications

Construction Agreement

Competitive Bidding

Modifications

Submittals

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 13: Contract Administration: Construction and Order Processing

Contract Administration: Construction

Contract Administration: Procurement and Order Processing

Shipping and Freight

Expediting

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Chapter 14: Contract Administration: Delivery and Project Closeout

Delivery and Installation

Project Closeout

Postoccupancy and Follow-Up

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Chapter 15: Creating and Managing an Interior Design Practice

Understanding Motivations and Risks of Business Ownership

Advantages and Disadvantages of Business Ownership

Functions of Management

Management Styles

Working Alone

The Stages of a Business

Buying an Existing Business

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 16: Advice and Counsel

Attorney

Accountant

Banker

Sources of Capital

Establishing Business Credit

Insurance

Technical Consultants

Sources of Information and Assistance

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

Organizations

What Would You Do?

Reference

Chapter 17: Preparing the Business Plan

The Business Plan

Start-Up Costs

Setting Up the Office

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Reference

Chapter 18: Business Formations

Sole Proprietorship

Partnerships

Limited Liability Company

Corporations

Joint Venture

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 19: Business Legal Filings and Licenses

Business Legal Filings

Licenses

Income Tax Basics

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

Filings

What Would You Do?

Chapter 20: Strategic Planning: Designing the Future

The Importance of Planning

Strategic Planning Basics

Mission Statements

Business Analysis

Business Goals, Objectives, Strategies, and Tactics

Budgeting

Measuring Performance

Benchmarking

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 21: Money Management

Accounting Methods: Accrual versus Cash Accounting

Accounting Records and Systems

Basic Financial Reports: Income Statement, Balance Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows

Managing Your Finances

Controlling Overhead

Computer Applications for Accounting

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Chapter 22: Fundamentals of Marketing

Branding

Target Marketing

Establishing a Niche

The Four Ps of Marketing

Marketing Analysis

Marketing Plan

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 23: Promotional Basics

Promotion

Public Relations

Publicity

Press Releases

Advertising

Internet and Social Media Marketing

Referrals

Networking

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 24: Promotional Tools and Methods

The Graphic Image and Stationery

Photo Portfolio

Brochures

Competitions

Direct Mail

Publication

Proposals as a Marketing Tool

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Reference

Chapter 25: Selling Strategies

What Is Selling?

Selling Services versus Products

The Buyer Decision-Making Process

Buyer Demographics

Building Client Relationships

Selling Techniques

Negotiating

The Selling Process

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 26: Design Presentations

Presentations

The Initial Client Interview

Project Presentations

Closing Techniques

Overcoming Objections

Follow-Up

Additional Guidelines for Making Presentations

Good Impressions

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 27: Employee Management

The Agency Relationship

Job Classifications

Job Descriptions

Employment at Will

Employment Contracts

Independent Contractors

Compensation and Fringe Benefits

The Performance Evaluation

The Employee Handbook

Mentoring

Sexual Harassment

Federal Laws Regulating Employment

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

Federal Employment Laws and Commissions

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 28: Goals and Career Options

A Personal Mission Statement

Personal and Professional Goals

Career Decisions

Design Career Specialties

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Chapter 29: The Job Search

The Search Is On

Resumés

Resumé Format

The Cover Letter

Portfolios

Digital Job Search Strategies

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

Reference

Chapter 30: On the Job

How Employers Review Resumés and Cover Letters

The Job Interview

Typical Interview Questions

Illegal Questions

Follow-Up

Your First Job

On-the-Job Strategies

Making a Career Change

Web Sites Relevant to This Chapter

Key Terms

What Would You Do?

References

Appendix

Glossary

General References

Index

Cover image: © Wolfgang Duerr/Stock4B/Getty Images

Copyright © 2014 by Christine M. Piotrowski. All rights reserved.

Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey.

Published simultaneously in Canada.

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600, or on the web at www.copyright.com. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, (201) 748-6011, fax (201) 748-6008, or online at www.wiley.com/go/permissions.

Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with the respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for damages arising herefrom.

Persons and company names mentioned in examples as well as in the “What Would You Do?” sections of the text are fictitious and do not represent any actual persons or companies.

For general information about our other products and services, please contact our Customer Care Department within the United States at (800) 762-2974, outside the United States at (317) 572-3993 or fax (317) 572-4002.

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Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Piotrowski, Christine M., 1947–

Professional practice for interior designers / Christine M. Piotrowski, FASID, IIDA. — Fifth Edition.

1 online resource.

Includes index.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

ISBN 978-1-118-09079-4 (cloth); ISBN 978-1-118-41595-5 (ebk); ISBN 978-1-118-41906-9 (ebk)

1. Interior decoration firms—United States—Management. 2. Design services—United States—Marketing. 3. Interior decoration—Practice—United States. I. Title.

NK2116.2

747.068—dc23

2012044646

978-1-118-09079-4

For my parents, Martha and Casmer:

I am sorry you are not here to share this with me.

PREFACE

Part of the education of an interior designer consists of learning about the business practices of the profession. Students cannot assume that a business’s success results solely from the innate creativity of the designers who own or work for a firm. It also comes from the quality of the professional practices of those involved in the business.

Regardless of the size of firm or design specialty, professional interior designers must understand and conduct themselves as businesspeople. Clients expect interior designers to be responsible for their decisions and practice. They expect excellence not only in creative work but in business conduct as well. This naturally results in an interior designer’s ever-increasing need for comprehensive knowledge of business.

As a design professional, manager, educator, and business owner, I have long believed in the importance of effective business practices for this profession. I have seen where good business practices have led to success. I have seen where poor business practices have led to frustration for business owners. My interests in trying to help students and professionals become better in their business led to the publication of the first edition of this book.

I have consistently updated this book to offer a comprehensive resource that provides a solid background in business practices for students. Educators should not feel that they must try to cover everything, and students should not feel overwhelmed by the contents. Educators can easily tailor their classes around the contents to meet the instructor’s desired focus and an institution’s priorities.

Its comprehensive content also makes it a practical choice for practitioners wanting to start or grow their own business. There are many chapters that are generally of greater concern to a business owner than a student, just as there are some chapters that will be of greater interest to students than professionals. For both professionals and students, Professional Practice for Interior Designers remains one of the primary references for the NCIDQ examination concerning many aspects of business practice.

The profession of interior design continues to be transformed. Concerns for legal and ethical business operations, sustainable design practice, the impact of technology, new ways of collaborating with industry cohorts, and generational changes in the client marketplace have all had an impact on business practice. These issues and others of importance are included in this new edition.

Changes in the outline of chapters, and content additions and deletions, were undertaken after receiving input from a variety of educators and professionals. Current information on business in general and interior design business in particular was also obtained by a review of relevant literature to gauge impact on practice. An extensive review and revision of all the text and examples was undertaken to update content. The material in the chapters was carefully reviewed to eliminate duplication of material, and this has, in some cases, led to a reorganization of topics.

Distinctive features of the fifth edition include the following:

1. Based on recommendations by educators, the material most applicable to what is commonly covered in a business practices class is grouped together at the beginning of the book.
2. The exception to this is that all the career chapters are grouped together at the end of the book.
3. New topics important to practice in the 21st century have been included throughout the book so that it continues to be a comprehensive text on interior design business practices. Those new sections are highlighted later in this preface.
4. Chapters most applicable to organizing and managing a practice now appear together. They follow a logical sequence of topics, from developing the business idea, to business plan and structure, to finances, marketing, and employee issues.
5. Each chapter begins with a list of critical issues to help the student study for exams; instructors can use these for class discussion or written assignments.
6. A box titled “NCIDQ Component” indicates the chapters or parts of chapters covering material that might be part of the examination.
7. Additional “What Would You Do?” scenarios have been added at the end of the chapter.
8. Important terms have been listed at the end of each chapter.
9. A list of Web sites relevant to the chapter content has been added at the end of each chapter.
10. The text remains easy to read, with many bulleted lists highlighting key points.
11. Icons are placed in the margins, showing where related content appears on the companion Web site, www.wiley.com/go/ppid.

So that readers can see where new sections and topics have been added, those items are italicized in the following discussion about the changes in the text.

Chapters 1 and 2 provide a comprehensive overview of the profession. Topics include why the study of business practices is important, the definition of a profession, the NCIDQ examination, professional association requirements, and the importance of licensing. A new section in Chapter 1 provides an overview of the business of interior design and how that relates to students and the study of professional practice. New sections have been added to discuss professional responsibility in a changing world, the value of interior design, and social responsibility.

Chapters 3 and 4 remain at the beginning of the book to highlight the importance of ethical and legal practice. The “What Would You Do?” discussion items at the end of Chapter 3 have been expanded. Information on cyber law and copyright now appears in Chapter 4.

Based on recommendations by educators, Chapter 5 provides a presentation of how and where designers work. This was done to give an overview of the “working world” of the design practitioner. A new section called “Expectations” discusses what the employer views as keys to what it will be looking for in a new employee.

The next four chapters cover critical information concerning how design firms earn revenue. Chapter 6 covers fees and project compensation methods; Chapter 7 details design contracts specifically related to design services; Chapter 8 details product pricing of goods; and Chapter 9 outlines important information about sales law and warranties related to selling merchandise. New information has been added concerning proper signatures on contracts, strategies for avoiding contract disputes, and using small claims courts.

The chapters concerning business project management begin with a discussion of trade sources in Chapter 10. The business side of project management is detailed in Chapter 11 with new material added concerning research—especially evidence-based design—as a project benefit, project delivery methods, selecting project teams, integrated design, and building information modeling. After careful review and updating, a new section discussing sustainable product specifications and an explanation of construction agreements were added to Chapter 12. Chapters 13 and 14 have been updated and revised.

Chapter 15 and the next five chapters focus on the development and management of a design practice. After thoroughly reviewing and updating existing material, a few chapters have been reorganized for clarity and new information added sparingly. However, important discussions on the triple bottom line, benchmarking, and green office management have been added.

The former two chapters on accounting were combined into Chapter 21. Material has been reorganized to better delineate the flow of the accounting process for interior designers. In particular, the first part of the chapter should make it easier for students to understand the importance of the forms and processes necessary to manage the firm’s finances.

Chapters 22 through 26 form a group on marketing and selling. It is hoped that the reorganization of topics in the first three chapters will not only be conducive to a better understanding of the importance of marketing for the continued health of a design firm, but also act as a discussion of strategies and tools to make that happen. New material has been added concerning specializing in green design, the changing demographics of clients, social media marketing, and the buyer decision-making process. A revision of the previous discussions on etiquette is included, as professionals still deem it a necessary topic.

Chapter 27 combines the previous edition’s two chapters on employee management. This reorganization and revision is expected to make this information more logically sequenced. Although brand new material was not deemed necessary, the chapter was thoroughly reviewed and modified for current practices.

As previously mentioned, the last three chapters group the information concerning career decisions and the job search. This was done because many educators report that these chapters are often covered together. Materials in all the chapters were carefully reviewed and revised based on current practice. Emphasis was placed on the digital job search and tools. Chapter 30 highlights the job interview and the transition from student to professional. It also includes a new section concerning on-the-job strategies to assist emerging professionals and practitioners make the best of their current job situation.

There is an extensive and updated list of references covering the topics in this book. Additional updated references to articles and other resources (including Web sites of organizations and sources of information useful to the reader) appear again in this edition.

Ancillary materials, including business forms, brief articles, and additional references, is available on this book’s companion Web site (www.wiley.com/go/ppid) whether readers purchase an electronic version or printed version of the text. The forms are PDFs so that they can be used in class.

A revised Instructor’s Manual—available only to educators—can be obtained online by contacting the publisher. The Instructor’s Manual includes a detailed table of contents that will help an instructor transition from the fourth to the fifth edition. As with previous Instructor’s Manuals, a test bank and discussion items are provided for each chapter. A series of Power Point slides are available to instructors for the first time as a teaching resource.

Since its first publication in 1990, this book has become the leading choice of educators for use in teaching an interior design business practices class in colleges and universities throughout the world. Educators often cite it for its clear writing style and content based on realistic practice situations. I am very proud and humbled by the extent of its adoption and practical use.

Visit the companion Web site: www.wiley.com/go/ppid for additional learning resources

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe a great measure of gratitude to the many designers, organizations, and educators that have contributed to this and previous editions of this book. Their unselfish sharing of information, business forms, and editorial comment has helped continue to enrich this book.

Thank you to those who shared documents in this edition: Charlene Conrad, IDC, IDNS; Juliana Catlin, FASID; Phyllis Moore, FASID; Suzan Globus, FASID; Michael Thomas, FASID; Greta Guelich, ASID; Debra May Himes, ASID; James Tigges, ASID, IIDA; Allyson Calvert, ASID; Kathleen Chaffee, Hickory Business Furniture; Leonard Alverado, Contract Office Group; Jain Malkin, CID; Fred Messner, IIDA; Sally Thompson, ASID; and Merritt Menefee, IIDA. I also want to thank the American Society of Interior Designers, International Interior Design Association, and National Council for Interior Design Qualification for their contributions and continued support.

Numerous educators have provided insights and comments that have helped in the revision of this book. They are too numerous to mention, but I want specifically to thank Liz Thompson of the Art Institute of Pittsburg; Robert Krikac from Washington State University; Cindy Stedman from the Art Institute of Phoenix; Carl Clark from Northern Arizona University; Dr. Carol Morrow from the Art Institute of Phoenix; Robin Wagner from Marymount University; Christine Kennedy of the Art Institute of Michigan; Tom Witt from Arizona State University; and Renee Hern of the International Academy of Design and Technology in Nashville, TN.

Many other interior design practitioners and organizations have provided information and documents in previous editions. I do not want to let their contributions to this text to go unnoticed; however, the list has become too long to include. My thanks to you all, nonetheless, is heartfelt. I do want to specifically thank a few for their tremendous support over the years: Dave Petroff, IIDA; Beth Harmon-Vaughn, FIIDA; Carl Clark, FASID; and Michael Thomas, FASID.

I would like to give a special thank-you to everyone at John Wiley & Sons who has supported this project over many years. In particular, thanks to Michael New, Editorial Assistant, and other editorial and production assistants; and Amanda Miller, Vice President and Publisher, my first editor at John Wiley & Sons. A very special thank-you to Paul Drougas, my editor and good friend, for your patience, support, and understanding during a trying time to complete this book.

I owe a great measure of gratitude to my family and great friends who have supported me in this edition and all the previous editions of this book. I especially want to thank Gail Schabow, Greta Guelich, and Mary Knott for holding me up when I wasn’t sure this would ever come about.

Lastly, I want to thank the readers who have continued to find this book an important resource for the operation of their businesses and as a learning tool for students. Your continued support and praise has been humbling and inspiring.

Christine M. Piotrowski

Chapter 1

Interior Design as a Profession

After completing this chapter you should be able to:

Discuss why the study of professional practices is important to any entry-level designer.

Explain how interior design is different from decorating as if you were talking to a client.

Identify the characteristics of a profession.

Explain how these characteristics relate to the practice of interior design.

Understand the history of the profession in order to learn about the professional practice of interior design.

Explain how the Great Depression of 1929 affected the interior design professional.

Name the organizations that became the American Society of Interior Designers and International Interior Design Association.

Identify key changes that led to the increasing professionalism of interior design.

Compare the practices of residential interior design and commercial interior design.

Explain how the section on the business of interior design affects your understanding of the profession as a whole.

Discuss how interior design provides value to a residential client and a small business owner.

The stereotype of the interior design profession has been of someone who understands how to use color and can rearrange furniture. This is, as you already know, not the full story of what an interior design professional is or does.

Interior design is a complex process and it requires learning much more than the color wheel. The body of knowledge and skills needed by professionals is extensive, and the work of the interior designer—regardless of specialty—is demanding as well as exciting. The professional interior designer’s solutions have to meet functional needs of the client, as well as result in a pleasing environment. The individuals who design interiors must be sure that their designs meet building, fire safety, and accessibility codes. Interior design solutions must also meet sustainable design criteria required by the owners.

A professional interior designer must be willing to accept the legal and ethical consequences of his or her actions. Those actions impact the general public, clients, and other practitioners. Local laws (including professional regulation, where it exists) can impact the work of the professional interior designer. The profession of interior design is also a business. The management and efficient operation of a business are critical to the successful ongoing life of an interior design practice.

Society tends to grant professionals higher status, money, and respect, yet these do not come automatically upon attaining the educational criteria required of the profession. They come to the individual who has the attitude of service, commitment, and knowledge that is expected of the professional. This is no less true for an interior design professional than any of the “traditional” professions.

This chapter, to use a design metaphor, is a foundation of information important to the overall study of the profession and how it functions as a business. The professional practice of interior design requires attention to the business procedures, strategies, and protocols that any business must use for the business to be successful, profitable, and long lasting. Designing interiors is not only an enjoyable way to make a living, but also an awesome responsibility.

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!

Lesen Sie weiter in der vollständigen Ausgabe!