Pagan Prayers - Marah Ellis Ryan - ebook
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PREFACEON THE WRITING OF A PRAYER OF PRAISETO THE CREATIVE GODAPACHE PRAYERNAVAJO LITURGYADDRESS TO SUPREME DEITYA PRAYER FOR THE DYINGBABYLONIAN PRAYER FOR HEALTHPRAYER TO THE SUNMAGICAL INCANTATIONCHINESE LITURGYCHINESE PRAYERPRAYER OF TRANSFORMATION INTO A LOTUSA PRAYER FOR PRESERVATION OF THE HEARTHYMN TO AMUN-RAPRAYER OF THE SOWERHYMN TO PANUTHE SALUTATION OF THE DAWNPRAYER TO BUDDHAHYMN TO AGNIPRAYER OF THE GAMBLERPRAYER TO KAMI-DANAPRAYER OF THE SINGERHYMN OF TLA-LOCHYMN TO THE ALL-MOTHERHYMN OF THE GOD OF FLOWERSPRAYER TO THE MEXICAN GOD OF FIRETHE PRAYER OF THE MAIZEHYMN TO CIHUA-COATLPRAYER TO THE GOD OF THIEVESINVOCATION TO ORMAZDMOHAMMEDAN PRAYER OF ADORATIONAN INCA’S DEATH PRAYERHYMN TO THE UNKNOWN GOD

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PAGAN PRAYERS

by

MARAH ELLIS RYAN

First digital edition 2017 by Maria Ruggieri

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

ON THE WRITING OF A PRAYER OF PRAISE

TO THE CREATIVE GOD

APACHE PRAYER

NAVAJO LITURGY

ADDRESS TO SUPREME DEITY

A PRAYER FOR THE DYING

BABYLONIAN PRAYER FOR HEALTH

PRAYER TO THE SUN

MAGICAL INCANTATION

CHINESE LITURGY

CHINESE PRAYER

PRAYER OF TRANSFORMATION INTO A LOTUS

A PRAYER FOR PRESERVATION OF THE HEART

HYMN TO AMUN-RA

PRAYER OF THE SOWER

HYMN TO PANU

THE SALUTATION OF THE DAWN

PRAYER TO BUDDHA

HYMN TO AGNI

PRAYER OF THE GAMBLER

PRAYER TO KAMI-DANA

PRAYER OF THE SINGER

HYMN OF TLA-LOC

HYMN TO THE ALL-MOTHER

HYMN OF THE GOD OF FLOWERS

PRAYER TO THE MEXICAN GOD OF FIRE

THE PRAYER OF THE MAIZE

HYMN TO CIHUA-COATL

PRAYER TO THE GOD OF THIEVES

INVOCATION TO ORMAZD

MOHAMMEDAN PRAYER OF ADORATION

AN INCA'S DEATH PRAYER

HYMN TO THE UNKNOWN GOD

PREFACE

THIS little book of thoughts big, and thoughts childish, goes to the reader with the hope that it bears the little known fact that Ancient America had a written aboriginal literature, much of which was beautiful.

The Apache and the Navajo prayers are oral, transmitted from priest to priest through the centuries; but the Mexican are fragments, rescued from a wide literature by the learned and courageous Franciscan, Bernardino de Sahagun, in the Seventeenth century.

The first archbishop of Mexico took credit to himself for the burning, in one town, of 60,000 Mexican books and manuscripts on history, religion, law, medicine, astrology, genealogy and poetry.

It was his part of the approved battle against the false gods. For four centuries he has had ardent imitators, which accounts for much.

The masked, dramatized prayers of the Indians of the Southwest of today, suggested to the compiler a key to ancient Mexican rituals where god or goddess replies directly to priest or suppliant.

This is the one special liberty taken with the records, the deity or priest is placed as the Indian places him, in the temple of feast or sacrifice; while the Spanish records gave only the spoken words with little to indicate the ritual or the speakers.

The Peruvian had reached a higher spiritual and philosophic stage of culture before his annihilation, though at loss of the spontaneous poetic imagery, wistful or colorful, of the Mexican.

Such as they are, these prayers reflect the culture of both extinct and living primitive peoples of the world we call the New, and they go out for judgment side by side with the better known rituals of the world we call the Old.

M. E. R.

ON THE WRITING OF A PRAYER OF PRAISE

(Mexican)

(This introduction to a volume of annals, written centuries ago by an unknown poet of ancient America, gives glimpse of the beauty of the native book craft, and the sacredness to them, of literature)

LIKE a red-winged heron of wonder, rising in flight, it shone. The mist and the glow of the rainbow, it is there! The harmony is as the tinkling turquoise bells on the silver drum: thus, was a book of annals written and painted in colors. I unwind my song! I unwind my song like a string of jewels, all precious.

TO THE CREATIVE GOD

(Accadian)

(The Accadian was already a dead language in the Seventeenth Century, B. C.)

O LORD of Charms, Illustrious! who gives Life to the Dead, the Merciful who lives, And grants to hostile gods of Heaven return, To homage render, worship thee, and learn Obedience! Thou who didst create mankind In tenderness, thy love round us, oh wind!