Wydawca: Classic Poetry Kategoria: Poezja i dramat Język: angielski Rok wydania: 2018

Uzyskaj dostęp do tej
i ponad 60000 książek
od 6,99 zł miesięcznie.

Wypróbuj przez
7 dni za darmo

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

e-czytniku kup za 1 zł
tablecie  
smartfonie  
komputerze  
Czytaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Liczba stron: 46

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostępny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacji Legimi na:

Androida
iOS
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?

Ebooka przeczytasz na:

e-czytniku EPUB kup za 1 zł
tablecie EPUB
smartfonie EPUB
komputerze EPUB
Czytaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?
Czytaj i słuchaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?

Pobierz fragment dostosowany na:

Zabezpieczenie: watermark

Opis ebooka Many Gods - Cale Young Rice

Many Gods is a book of poetry written in 1910.Cale Young Rice was an American poet and dramatist. He was born in Dixon, Kentucky, to Laban Marchbanks Rice, a Confederate veteran and tobacco merchant, and his wife Martha Lacy. He was a younger brother of Laban Lacy Rice, a noted educator. Cale Rice grew up in Evansville, Indiana, and Louisville, Kentucky. He was educated at Cumberland University and at Harvard (A.B., 1895; A.M., 1896).He was married to the popular author Alice Hegan Rice; they worked together on several books. The marriage was childless, and Cale committed suicide by gunshot during the night of January 23–24 at his home in Louisville a year after her death due to his sorrow at losing her.His birthplace in Dixon is designated by Kentucky State Historical Marker 1508, which reads:"Birthplace of Rice brothers, Cale Young, 1872-1943, noted poet and author; Laban Lacy, 1870-1973, well-known educator and author. Lacy published The Best Poetic Works of Cale Young Rice after Cale's death. Included in famous collection is poem, "The Mystic." Cale married Alice Hegan, also a distinguished Kentucky writer. Home overlooks Memorial Garden."

Opinie o ebooku Many Gods - Cale Young Rice

Fragment ebooka Many Gods - Cale Young Rice

MANY GODS

………………

Cale Young Rice

Thank you for reading. In the event that you appreciate this book, please consider sharing the good word(s) by leaving a review, or connect with the author.

This book is a work of poetry; its contents are wholly imagined.

All rights reserved. Aside from brief quotations for media coverage and reviews, no part of this book may be reproduced or distributed in any form without the author’s permission. Thank you for supporting authors and a diverse, creative culture by purchasing this book and complying with copyright laws.

Copyright © 2018 www.deaddodopublishing.co.uk

TABLE OF CONTENTS

“ALL’S WELL”

I.

II.

III.

IV.

THE PROSELYTE RECANTS

LOVE IN JAPAN

I.

II.

MAPLE LEAVES ON MIYAJIMA

TYPHOON

PENANG

WHEN THE WIND IS LOW

THE PAGODA SLAVE

THE SHIPS OF THE SEA

KINCHINJUNGA

I.

II.

III.

IV.

V.

THE BARREN WOMAN

BY THE TAJ MAHAL

LOVE’S CYNIC

I.

II.

III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

X.

XI.

XII.

IN A TROPICAL GARDEN

I.

II.

III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

THE WIND’S WORD

THE SHRINE OF SHRINES

FROM A FELUCCA

THE EGYPTIAN WAKES

THE IMAM’S PARABLE

SONGS OF A SEA-FARER

I.

II.

A SONG OF THE SECTS

The Armenian sings

The Latin sings

The Copt sings

The Greek sings

The Four again

THE CITY

VIA AMOROSA

DUSK AT HIROSHIMA

THE WANDERER

IN A SHINTO TEMPLE GARDEN

FAR FUJIYAMA

ON MIYAJIMA MOUNTAIN

OLD AGE

ON THE YANG-TSE-KIANG

THE SEA-ARMIES

THE CHRISTIAN IN EXILE

THE PARSEE WOMAN

SHAH JEHAN TO MUMTAZ MAHAL

PRINCESS JEHANARA

A SINGHALESE LOVE LAMENT

ON THE ARABIAN GULF

THE RAMESSID

IMMORTAL FOES

THE CONSCRIPT

NAVIS IGNOTA

THE CROSS OF THE SEPULCHRE

THE NUN

ALPINE CHANT

THE MAN OF MIGHT

IN TIME OF AWE

SUNRISE IN UTAH

CONSOLATION

I.

II.

III.

WAVES

VIS ULTIMA

MEREDITH

“ALL’S WELL”

………………
………………

I.

The illimitable leaping of the sea,

The mouthing of his madness to the moon,

The seething of his endless sorcery,

His prophecy no power can attune,

Swept over me as, on the sounding prow

Of a great ship that steered into the stars,

I stood and felt the awe upon my brow

Of death and destiny and all that mars.

II.

The wind that blew from Cassiopeia cast

Wanly upon my ear a rune that rung;

The sailor in his eyrie on the mast

Sang an “All’s well,” that to the spirit clung

Like a lost voice from some aërial realm

Where ships sail on forever to no shore,

Where Time gives Immortality the helm,

And fades like a far phantom from life’s door.

III.

“And is all well, O Thou Unweariable

Launcher of worlds upon bewildered space,”

Rose in me, “All? or did thy hand grow dull

Building this world that bears a piteous race?

O was it launched too soon or launched too late?

Or can it be a derelict that drifts

Beyond thy ken toward some reef of Fate

On which Oblivion’s sand forever shifts?”

IV.

The sea grew softer as I questioned—calm

With mystery that like an answer moved,

And from infinity there fell a balm,

The old peace that God is, tho all unproved.

The old faith that tho gulfs sidereal stun

The soul, and knowledge drown within their deep,

There is no world that wanders, no not one

Of all the millions, that He does not keep.

………………

THE PROSELYTE RECANTS

………………

(In Japan)

………………

Where the fair golden idols

Sit in darkness and in silence

While the temple drum beats solemnly and slow;

Where the tall cryptomerias

Sway in worship round about

And the rain that is falling whispers low;

I can hear strange voices

Of the dead and forgotten,

On the dimly rising incense I can see

The lives I have lived,

And my lives unbegotten,

Namu Amida Butsu pity me!

I was born this karma

Of a mother in Chuzenji,

Where Nantai-zan looks down into the lake;

Where the white-thronged pilgrims

Climb to altars in the clouds

And behold the holy eastern dawn awake.

It was there I wandered

Till a priest of the Christians

With the crucifix he wore compelled my gaze.

In grief I had grown,

So upon its grief I pondered.

Namu Amida Butsu, keep my days!

It was wrong, he told me,

To pray Jiso for my children,

And Binzuru for healing of my ills.

And our gods so many

Were conceived, he said, in sin,

From Lord Shaka to the least upon the hills.

In despair I listened

For my heart beat hopeless,

Not a temple of my land had helped me live.

But alas that day

When I let my soul be christened!

Namu Amida Butsu, O forgive!

For the Christ they gave me

As the only Law and Lotus,

As the only way to Light that will not wane,

May perchance have power

For the people of the West,

But to me he seemed the servitor of pain.

For in pain he perished

As one born to passion: