Wydawca: Abela Publishing Kategoria: Fantastyka i sci-fi Język: angielski Rok wydania: 2017

LEGEND LAND - A collection of Ancient Legends from the South Western counties of England ebook

Anon E Mouse  

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Opis ebooka LEGEND LAND - A collection of Ancient Legends from the South Western counties of England - Anon E. Mouse

This volume contains 12 ancient legends from the England’s West Country of Devon, Cornwall and Wales plus two supplements, "The Furry Day Song" and the iconic “Trelawny”, also known as The Song of the Western Men. In this volume you will also find stories like The Mermaid Of Zennor, The Stone Men Of St. Cleer, The Giants Who Built The Mount, How Bala Lake Began and more.This small volume was an early form of Great Western’s modern day “Top 10 Things To Do” and gave the rail traveller a list of English, West Country legends to look up and places to see. It is a reissue in book form of the first series of The Line to Legend Land leaflets, originally published by the G.W.R. in 1922.In older, simpler days, when reading was  a rare accomplishment, our many times great-grandparents would gather round the blazing fire of kitchen or hall on the long, dark winter nights and pass away the hours before bedtime in conversation and story-Telling. In some cases a storyteller would visit a village and the whole community would crowd in to the largest room in the settlement to listen to the spoken word. These are a direct recording from the legends spoken by some of the last storytellers of England and endeavour to retain a degree of the vernacular which gives these legends a new life. 

Opinie o ebooku LEGEND LAND - A collection of Ancient Legends from the South Western counties of England - Anon E. Mouse

Fragment ebooka LEGEND LAND - A collection of Ancient Legends from the South Western counties of England - Anon E. Mouse

LEGEND LAND

Being a collection

of some of the OLD TALES told in those

Western Parts of Britain

served by the

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY

retold by LYONESSE

VOLUME ONE

Originally Published in 1922 byTHE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY

Republished by

Abela Publishing, London

[2017]

Legend Land

A collection of old tales from Western Britain

Typographical arrangement of this edition

© Abela Publishing 2017

This book may not be reproduced in its current format in any

manner in any media, or transmitted by any means whatsoever,

electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical ( including

photocopy, file or video recording, internet web sites, blogs,

wikis, or any other information storage and retrieval system)

except as permitted by law without the prior written permission

of the publisher.

Abela Publishing

London

United Kingdom

2017

ISBN-13: 978-8-822814-95-1

Email

Books@AbelaPublishing.com

Website

www.AbelaPublishing.com

This is a reprint in book form of the first series of The Line to Legend Land leaflets, together with a Supplement, "The Furry Day Song" plus the iconic Trelawny, also known as the Song of the Western Men.

The Map provides a guide to the localities of the six Cornish legends and the "Furry Day Song"; that at the back to the six stories of Wales.

CONTENTS

ILLUSTRATIONS

FOREWORD

LEGEND LAND

TRELAWNY

THE MERMAID OF ZENNOR

THE STONE MEN OF ST. CLEER

HOW ST. PIRAN CAME TO CORNWALL

THE LOST CHILD OF ST. ALLEN

THE GIANTS WHO BUILT THE MOUNT

THE TASKS OF TREGEAGLE

THE LADY OF LLYN-Y-FAN FACH

ST. DAVID AND HIS MOTHER

THE VENGEANCE OF THE FAIRIES

THE OLD WOMAN WHO FOOLED THE DEVIL

THE WOMEN SOLDIERS OF FISHGUARD

HOW BALA LAKE BEGAN

THE FURRY DAY SONG

ILLUSTRATIONS

THE MERMAID OF ZENNOR

THE STONE MEN OF ST. CLEER

HOW ST. PIRAN CAME TO CORNWALL

THE LOST CHILD OF ST. ALLEN

THE GIANTS WHO BUILT THE MOUNT

THE TASKS OF TREGEAGLE

THE LADY OF LLYN-Y-FAN FACH

ST. DAVID AND HIS MOTHER

THE VENGEANCE OF THE FAIRIES

THE OLD WOMAN WHO FOOLED THE DEVIL

THE WOMEN SOLDIERS OF FISHGUARD

HOW BALA LAKE BEGAN

THE FURRY DAY SONG

FOREWORD

In those older, simpler days, when reading was a rare accomplishment, our many times great-grandparents would gather round the blazing fire of kitchen or hall on the long, dark winter nights and pass away the hours before bedtime in conversation and story-telling.

The old stories were told again and again. The children learned them in their earliest years and passed them on to their children and grandchildren in turn. And, as is natural, in all this telling the stories changed little by little. New and more familiar characters were introduced, or a story-teller with more vivid imagination than his fellows would add a bit here and there to make a better tale of it.

But in origin most of these old legends date from the very dawn of our history. In a primitive form they were probably told round the camp-fires of that British army that went out to face invading Cæsar.

Then with the spread of education they began to die. When many folk could read and books grew cheap there was no longer the need to call upon memory for the old-fashioned romances.

Yet there have always been those who loved the old tales best, and they wrote them down before it was too late, so that they might be preserved for ever. A few of them are retold briefly here.

All people should like the old stories; all nice people do. To them I commend these tales of Legend Land, in the hope that they may grow to love them and the countries about which they are written.

Lyonesse

LEGEND LAND

TRELAWNY

Song of the Western Men

(R. S. Hawker)

A good sword and a trusty hand!A merry heart and true!King James's men shall understandWhat Cornish lads can do!And have they fixed the where and when?And shall Trelawny die?Here's twenty thousand Cornish menWill know the reason why!

And shall Trelawny live?

And shall Trelawny die?

Here's twenty thousand Cornish men

Will know the reason why!

Out spake their Captain brave and bold:A merry wight was he:Though London Tower were Michael's hold,We'll set Trelawny free!'We'll cross the Tamar, land to land:The Severn is no stay:

With "one and all," and hand in hand;And who shall bid us nay?

And shall Trelawny live?

And shall Trelawny die?

Here's twenty thousand Cornish men

Will know the reason why!

And when we come to London Wall,A pleasant sight to view,Come forth! come forth! ye cowards all:Here's men as good as you.'Trelawny he's in keep and hold;Trelawny he may die:Here's twenty thousand Cornish boldWill know the reason why

And shall Trelawny live?

And shall Trelawny die?

Here's twenty thousand Cornish men

Will know the reason why!

THE MERMAID OF ZENNOR

Carved on one of the pews in the church of Zennor in West Cornwall is a strange figure of a mermaid. Depicted with flowing hair, a mirror in one hand and a comb in the other, the Zennor folk tell a strange story about her.

Years and years ago, they say, a beautiful and richly dressed lady used to attend the church sometimes. Nobody knew where she came from, although her unusual beauty and her glorious voice caused her to be the subject of discussion throughout the parish.

So attractive was she that half the young men of the village fell in love with her, and one of them, Mathey Trewella, a handsome youth and one of the best singers in the neighbourhood, determined that he would discover who she was.

The beautiful stranger had smiled at him in church one Sunday, and after service he followed her as she walked away towards the cliffs.

Mathey Trewella never returned to Zennor, nor did the lovely stranger ever attend church again.

Years passed by, and Mathey's strange disappearance was almost forgotten when, one Sunday morning, a ship cast anchor off Pendower Cove, near Zennor. The captain of the vessel was sitting idling on the deck when he heard a beautiful voice hailing him from the sea. Looking over the side he saw the mermaid, her long yellow hair floating all around her.

She asked him to be so kind as to pull up his anchor, for it was resting upon the doorway of her house under the sea and she was anxious to get back to Mathey, her husband, and her children.

In alarm, the captain weighed anchor and stood out to sea, for sailors fear that mermaids will bring bad luck. But later he returned and told the Zennor folk of Mathey's fate, and they, to commemorate the strange event, and to warn other young men against the wiles of the merrymaids, had the mermaid figure carved in the church.

And there it is to-day for all the world to see, and to prove, to those who do not believe the old stories, the truth of poor Mathey Trewella's sad fate.