JAMAICAN ANANSI STORIES - 167 Anansi Children's Stories from the Caribbean - Various - ebook
Opis

Herein you will find 149 Anansi tales and a further 18 Witticisms. The stories are categorised into Animal Stories, Old Stories (chiefly of sorcery), Dance and Song and Witticisms. You will find stories as varied in title and content as “The Fish-Basket”, “The Storm“, “The King's Two Daughters”, “The Gub-Gub Peas”, “Simon Tootoos”, “The Tree-Wife” and many, many more unique tales.THE STORIES in this collection were recorded from the lips of over sixty negro story-tellers in the remote country districts of Jamaica during two visits to the island in the summer of 1919 and the winter of 1921. The role of Anansi, the trickster spider, is akin to the Native American Coyote and the (Southern African) Bantu Hare.In some instances, Martha Warren Beckwith was able to record musical notation to accompany the stories. As such you will find these scattered throughout the book. In this way the original style of the story-telling, which in some instances mingles story, song and dance, is as nearly as possible preserved in this volume.

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BY

MARTHA WARREN BECKWITH

With Music Recorded In The Field

By

Helen Roberts

Originally Published By

The American Folk-Lore Society

New York

G. E. Stechert & Co., Agents

[1924]

Memoirs Of

The American Folk-Lore Society.

Volume Xvii.

1924.

* * * * * * *

Resurrected by

Abela Publishing

London

[2014]

Jamaican Anansi Stories

Typographical arrangement of this edition

© Abela Publishing 2014

This book may not be reproduced in its current format in any manner in any media, or transmitted by any means whatsoever, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical ( including photocopy, file or video recording, internet web sites, blogs, wikis, or any other information storage and retrieval system) except as permitted by law without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Abela Publishing,

London

United Kingdom

2010

ISBN-13: 978-1-909302-37-2

email

[email protected]

website

www.abelapublishing.com/anansi.html

Frontis: Anansi the Spider

Terry Kole

[2011]

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Abela Publishing acknowledges the work that

Martha Warren Beckwith

did in publishing

Jamaican Anansi Stories

in a time well before any electronic media was in use.

* * * * * * *

33% of the net profit from the sale of this book

will be donated to the

SENTEBALE charity

supporting children in Lesotho orphaned by aids.

* * * * * * *

YESTERDAYS BOOKS

raising funds for

TODAYS CHARITIES

PREFACE

The stories in this collection were taken down from the lips of over sixty negro story-tellers in the remote country districts of Jamaica during two visits to the island, one of six weeks in the summer of 1919, the other of five weeks in the winter of 1921. The music was all recorded during the second visit by Miss Helen Roberts, either directly from the story-teller or from a phonographic record which I had made. In this way the original style of the story-telling, which in some instances mingles story, song and dance, is as nearly as possible preserved, although much is necessarily lost in the slow process of dictation. The lively and dramatic action, the change in voice, even the rapid and elliptical vernacular, can not appear on the printed page. But the stories are set down without polish or adornment, as nearly as possible as they were told to me, and hence represent, so far as they go, a true folk art.

Although some story-tellers claimed to know "more than a hundred" stories, no one narrator gave me more than thirty, and usually not more than four or five at one interview.

To all such story-telling, as to riddling and song, the name of "Anansi story" is applied,--an appellation at least as old as 1816, when Monk Lewis in his journal describes the classes of "Nancy stories" popular in his day among the negroes as the tragical witch story and the farcical "neger-trick." The "neger-trick" harks back to slave times and is rarely heard to-day; tales of sorcery, too, are heard best from the lips of older narrators. Modern European fairy tales and animal stories (evidently unknown to Lewis) have taken their place. Two influences have dominated story-telling in Jamaica, the first an absorbing interest in the magical effect of song which, at least in the old witch tales, far surpasses that in the action of the story; the second, the conception of the spider Anansi as the trickster hero among a group of animal figures. Anansi is the culture hero of the Gold Coast,--a kind of god--, just as Turtle is of the Slave coast and Hare (our own Brer Rabbit) of the Bantu people "Anansi stories" regularly form the entertainment during wake-nights, and it is difficult not to believe that the vividness with which these animal actors take part in the story springs from the idea that they really represent the dead in the underworld whose spirits have the power, according to the native belief, of taking animal form. The head-man on a Westmoreland cattle-pen even assured me that Anansi, once a man, was now leader of the dead in this land of shades. However this may be, the development of Jamaican obeah or witchcraft has been along the same two lines of interest. Magic songs are used in communicating with the dead, and the obeah-man who sets a ghost upon an enemy often sends it in the form of some animal; hence there are animals which must be carefully handled lest they be something other than they appear.

Riddling is a favorite pastime of the Jamaica negro. Much is preserved from old African originals in the personification of common objects of yard and road-side, much is borrowed also from old English folk riddling. That this spread has been along the line of a common language is proved by the fact that only a dozen parallels occur in Mason's Spanish collection from Porto Rico, at least ten of which are quoted by Espinosa from New Mexico, while of collections from English-speaking neighbors, fourteen out of fifty-five riddles collected in South Carolina and nine out of twenty-one from Andros Island are found also in Jamaica. Particular patterns are set for Jamaica riddling into which the phrasing falls with a rhythmical swing careless of rhyme,--"My father has in his yard" and "Going up to town." The giving of a riddle is regularly preceded by a formula drawn from old English sources--

Riddle me this, riddle me that,Perhaps you can guess this riddleAnd perhaps not!

generally abbreviated into

Riddle me riddle,Guess me this riddle,And perhaps not.

The art is practised as a social amusement, groups forming in which each person in the circle must propound riddles until his supply is exhausted or his riddle unguessed.

My own work as a collector in this engrossing field of Jamaican folk-lore owes much to those collectors who have preceded me and who have enjoyed a longer and more intimate acquaintance than has been possible for me with the people and their idiom;--to Monk Lewis, a true folk-lorist, whose "Journal" of 1816 is of the greatest interest to-day, to Mr. Walter Jekyll and his excellent volume of songs and stories in the Folk-lore Publications of 1907, and to the writers of nursery tales, Mrs. Milne-Home, Pamela Smith, and Mrs. W. E. Wilson (Wona). I take this opportunity also to acknowledge most gratefully the many courtesies for which I am indebted during my visits to the island. I particularly wish to thank Professor Frank Cundall for his advice and cooperation, and for the use of the invaluable West India library connected with the Jamaica Institute in Kingston where I was able to consult books not easily to be found in library collections. To the Hon. and Mrs. Coke-Kerr, to Mrs. Harry Farquharson and to the Rev. and Mrs. Ashton I am gratefully indebted for many courtesies in the task of finding reliable native informants. To these informants themselves,--to Simeon Falconer, William Forbes, George Parkes, and a score of others I owe thanks for their ready response to my interest. In America also I wish to thank Mrs. Elsie Clews Parsons for suggestions as to method and for the use of her valuable bibliography and Mrs. Louise Dennis Hand for help with Spanish collections, and to express my grateful obligations to Professor Franz Boas for his patient editing and valuable bibliographical suggestions.

Martha Warren Beckwith

The Folk-lore FoundationVassar CollegeApril, 1924.

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

PREFACE

CONTENTS

ANANSI ANIMAL STORIES

1. TYING TIGER

a. The Fish-basket.

b. The Storm

2. TIGER AS SUBSTITUTE

a. The King's Two Daughters

b. The Gub-gub Peas.

3. TIGER AS RIDING-HORSE

4. TIGER'S SHEEP-SKIN SUIT

5. TIGER CATCHING THE SHEEP-THIEF

a. The Escape

b. The Substitute

c. In the House-top

6. TIGER'S BREAKFAST

7. EGGS AND SCORPIONS

8. TIGER'S BONE-HOLE

9. THE CHRISTENING

10. EATING TIGER'S GUTS

a. The Tell-tale

b. The Monkeys' Song.

11. THROWING AWAY KNIVES

a. Tiger and Anansi

b. Sheep and Anansi

12. GRACE BEFORE MEAT

a. Monkey and Anansi

b. Goat and Anansi

13. DAY-TIME TROUBLE

a. Rabbit and Anansi

b. Rat and Anansi

c. Goat and Anansi

14. NEW NAMES

15. LONG-SHIRT

16. SHUT UP IN THE POT

17. HOUSE IN THE AIR

a. Tracking Anansi

b. Rabbit and Children going up to Heaven

c. Duppy's House in the Air

d. Carencro's House with a Key

18. GOAT ON THE HILL-SIDE

19. DOG AND DOG-HEAD

20. TACOOMAH'S CORN-PIECE

21. ANANSI AND THE TAR-BABY

a. The Escape from Tiger

b. The Substitute

c. The Grave.

22. INSIDE THE COW

23. CUNNIE-MORE-THAN-FATHER.

24. THE DUCKANO TREE

25. FOOD AND CUDGEL

a. The Handsome Packey

b. The Knife and Fork

26. THE RIDDLE

27. ANANSI AND BROTHER DEAD

a. Brother Dead's Wife

b. Goat and Plantain

28. BROTHER DEAD AND THE BRINDLE PUPPY

29. THE COWITCH AND MR. FOOLMAN

30. DRY-HEAD AND ANANSI

a. Go-long-go

b. Dry-head

c. Brother Dead

31. THE YAM-HILLS

32. THE LAW AGAINST BACK-BITING

a. Duck's Dream

b. Guinea-chick

c. Dry-head at the Barber's

33. FLING-A-MILE

34. BUT-BUT AND ANANSI

35. TUMBLE-BUG AND ANANSI

36. HORSE AND ANANSI

37. ANANSI IN MONKEY COUNTRY

a. Bunya

b. Christen Christen

38. CURING THE SICK

a. The Fishes

b. The Six Children.

39. ANANSI, WHITE-BELLY AND FISH

40. GOAT'S ESCAPE

a. The Rain

b. The Dance (1)

b. The Dance (2)

41. TURTLE'S ESCAPE

42. FIRE AND ANANSI

43. QUIT-QUIT AND ANANSI

a. Tailors and Fiddlers

b. Fiddlers

44. SPIDER MARRIES MONKEY'S DAUGHTER

45. THE CHAIN OF VICTIMS

46. WHY TUMBLE-BUG ROLLS IN THE DUNG

47. WHY JOHN-CROW HAS A BALD HEAD

a. The Baptism

b. The Dance

48. WHY DOG IS ALWAYS LOOKING

49. WHY ROCKS AT THE RIVER ARE COVERED WITH

MOSS

50. WHY GROUND-DOVE COMPLAINS

51. WHY HOG IS ALWAYS GRUNTING.

52. WHY TOAD CROAKS.

53. WHY WOODPECKER BORES WOOD.

54. WHY CRAB IS AFRAID AFTER DARK.

55. WHY MICE ARE NO BIGGER.

56. RAT'S WEDDING.

57. COCKROACH STORIES.

a. Cock's Breakfast.

b. Feigning Sick. (1)

b. Feigning Sick. (2)

c. The Drum.

58. HUNTER, GUINEA-HEN AND FISH.

59. RABBIT STORIES

a. The Tar Baby

b. Saying Grace

c. Pretending Dead

60. THE ANIMAL RACE.

A. Horse And Turtle

b. Pigeon and Parrot.

61. THE FASTING TRIAL (FRAGMENT)

62. MAN IS STRONGER

OLD ANANSI STORIES, CHIEFLY OF SORCERY

63. THE PEA THAT MADE A FORTUNE

64. SETTLING THE FATHER'S DEBT

65. MR. LENAMAN'S CORN-FIELD

66. SIMON TOOTOOS

67. THE TREE-WIFE

68. SAMMY THE COMFEREE

69. GRANDY-DO-AN'-DO

a. Moses Hendricks, Mandeville

b. Julia Gentle, Malvern, Santa Cruz Mountains

70. JACK AND HARRY

71. PEA-FOWL AS MESSENGER

a. John Studee

b. Contavio

72. THE BARKING PUPPY

73. THE SINGING BIRD

a. Fine Waiting Boy

b. The Golden Cage

74. TWO SISTERS

75. ASOONAH

76. THE GREEDY CHILD

a. Crossing the River

b. The Plantain

77. ALIMOTY AND ALIMINTY

78. THE FISH LOVER

a. Timbo Limbo

b. Fish fish fish

c. Dear Old Juna

79. JUGGIN STRAW BLUE

80. THE WITCH AND THE GRAIN OF PEAS

81. BOSEN CORNER

82. THE THREE DOGS

a. Boy and Witch Woman

b. Lucy and Janet

83. ANDREW AND HIS SISTERS

84. THE HUNTER

a. The Bull turned Courter

b. The Cow turned Woman

85. MAN-SNAKE AS BRIDEGROOM

a. The Rescue. (1)

a. The Rescue. (2)

b. Snake Swallows the Bride

86. THE GIRLS WHO MARRIED THE DEVIL

a. The Devil-husband

b. The Snake-husband

87. BULL AS BRIDEGROOM

a. Nancy

b. The Play-song

c. Gracie and Miles

88. THE TWO BULLS

89. BALLINDER BULL

90. BIRD ARINTO

91. TIGER SOFTENS HIS VOICE

92. HIDDEN NAMES

a. Anansi and Mosquito

b. Anansi plays baby. (1)

b. Anansi plays baby. (2)

b. Anansi plays baby. (3)

93. ANANSI AND MR. ABLE

94. THE KING'S THREE DAUGHTERS

95. THE DUMB CHILD

96. THE DUMB WIFE

97. LEAP, TIMBER, LEAP

a. Old Conch

b. Grass-quit (fragment)

98. THE BOY FOOLS ANANSI

99. THE WATER CRAYFISH

ANANSI DANCE & SONG

100. THE FIFER

101. IN COME MURRAY

102. TACOOMAH MAKES A DANCE

103. ANANSI MAKES A DANCE

104. RED YAM

105. GUZZAH MAN

106. FOWL AND PRETTY POLL

107. THE CUMBOLO

108. JOHN-CROW AND FOWL AT COURT

109. WOODEN PING-PING AND COCK

110. ANIMAL TALK

ANANSI WITTICISMS

OLD-TIME FOOLS

I, II & III

DUPPY STORIES

IV, V, VI, VII & VIII

ANIMAL JESTS

IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, XIV, XV

LIES

XVI & XVII

PHILOSOPHY

XVIII

ANANSI ANIMAL STORIES

1. Tying Tiger

a. The Fish-basket.

George Parkes, Mandeville.

One great hungry time. Anansi couldn't get anyt'ing to eat, so he take up his hand-basket an' a big pot an' went down to the sea-side to catch fish. When he reach there, he make up a large fire and put the pot on the fire, an' say, "Come, big fish!" He catch some big fish put them aside. He said, "Big fish go, make little fish come!" He then catch the little fish. He say, "Little fish go, make big fish come!" an' say, "Big fish go, make little fish come!" He then catch the pot full an' his hand-basket. He bile the pot full and sit down and eat it off; he then started home back with the pot on his head and the basket. Reaching a little way, he hide the pot away in the bush an take the basket along with him now.

While going along, he meet up Tiger. Now Tiger is a very rough man an' Anansi 'fraid of him. Tiger said to him, "What you have in that basket, sah?"--speak to him very rough. Anansi speak in a very feeble voice, say, "Nothing, sah! nothing, sah!" So both of them pass each other, an' when they went on a little way, Tiger hide in the bush watching Anansi. Anansi then sit down underneath a tree, open his basket, take out the fishes one one, and say, "Pretty little yallah-tail this!" an' put it aside; he take out a snapper an' say, "Pretty little snapper this!" an' put it one side; he take out a jack-fish an' say, "Pretty little jack-fish!" an' put it one side. Tiger then run up an' say, "Think you havn't not'ing in that basket, sah!" Anansi say, "I jus' going down to the sea have a bathe, sah, an' I catch them few 'itte fishes." Tiger say, "Give it to me here, sah!"--talk in a very rough manner. An' Tiger take it an' eat them all an' spit up the bones. Anansi then take up the bones an' eat them, an' while eating he grumble an' say, "But look me bwoy labor do!" Tiger say, "What you say?" Anansi say, "Fly humbug me face, sah!" (brushing his face). So booth of them start to go home now with the empty basket, but this time Anansi was studying for Tiger. When he reach part of the way, Anansi see a fruit-tree. Anansi say, "What a pretty fruit-tree!" (looking up in the tree). Tiger say, "Climb it, sah!" (in a rough manner). So when Anansi go up an' pull some of the fruit, at that time Tiger was standing underneath the tree. Anansi look down on Tiger head an' said, "Look lice in a Brar Tiger head!" Tiger said, "Come down an' ketch it, sah!" Anansi come down an' said to Tiger he kyan't ketch it without he lean on the tree. Tiger said, "Lean on the tree, sah!" The hair on Tiger head is very long. So while Anansi ketchin' the lice, Tiger fell asleep. Anansi now take the hair an' lash it round the tree tie up Tiger on the tree. After he done that he wake up Tiger an' say that he kyan't ketch any more. Tiger in a rough manner say, "Come an' ketch it, sah!" Anansi say, "I won't!" So Anansi run off, Tiger spring after him, an' fin' out that his hair is tied on the tree. So Tiger say, "Come an' loose me, sah!" Anansi say. "I won't!" an' Anansi sing now,

"See how Anansi tie Tiger,See how Anansi tie Tiger,Tie him like a hog, Tiger,See how Anansi tie Tiger,Tie him like a hog, Tiger!"

An' Anansi leave him go home, am' a hunter-man come an' see Tiger tie on the tree, make kill him.

b. The Storm

Vivian-Bailey, Mandeville.

Brer Tiger got a mango-tree in his place. Brer Nansi go an' ask if he could sell him a ha' penny wort' of mango. Brer Tiger say no. Brer Nansi well want de mango. Brer Nansi say, "Law pass dat eb'ry man have tree mus' tie on it 'cause going to get a heavy storm." Brer Tiger say, well, mus' tie him to de mango-tree. After Brer Nansi tie Tiger, climb up in de mango-tree, an' eb'ry mango he eat tak it an' lick Brer Tiger on de head. After he eat done, he shake off all de ripe mango an' pick dem up go away leave Brer Tiger tie up on de mango-tree.

Brer Tiger see Brer But pass an' ask Brer But to loose him. Brer But say dat he kyan't stop. Brer Tiger see Brer Ant passing, ask Brer Ant to loose him; Brer Ant say he kyan't depon1 haste. Brer Tiger see Brer Duck-ants passing an' ask him fe loose him. An' don' know if him will loose him, for don' know if him will put up wid him slowness, for Duck-ants is a very slow man. After him loose him, Brer Tiger tell him many t'anks an' tell him mus' never let him hear any of Duck-ants's frien's pass him an' don' call up "How-dy-do."

Brer Nansi in a cotton tree were listening when dey talking. De nex' evening, Brer Nansi go to Brer Tiger yard an' knock at de door. An' say, "Who is deah?" an' say, "Mr. Duck-ants's brudder." An' dey tak him in an' mak much of him, get up tea because it was Mr. Duck-ants's brudder, an' after dat go to bed. In de morning provide tea for Mr. Duck-ants 'fore he wake, an' when he wake an' was washin' his face he got to tak off his hat. An' Brer Nansi is a man wid a bald head, an' dey got to fin' out it was Brer Nansi an' dey run him out of de house.

2. Tiger as Substitute

a. The King's Two Daughters

William Forbes, Dry River.

Deh was Anansi. He go out an' court two young lady was de king daughter an' mak dem a fool, an' dem ketch him an' tie him, an' de two sister go an' look a bundle a wood fe go an' mak a fire under a copper2 fe bu'n him wid hot water. An' after when dem gone, he see Tiger was coming. Anansi said, "Lawd! Brar Tiger, I get into trouble heah!" An' said, "Fe wha'?" An' say, "King daughter wan' lib wid dem, come tie me." Tiger say, 'You fool, mak y' loose an' tie me!"

Anansi tie Tiger dere now an' Anansi go to a grass-root an' dodge. An' when de misses go t'row down de wood at de fireside, de littlest one say, "Sister! sister! look de little uncle wha' we tie heah, him tu'n a big uncle now!" Sister say, "I soon 'big uncle' him!" an' dem mak up de fire bu'n up de water, tak two ladle an' dem dashey upon Tiger. An' him jump, an' jump, pop de rope, tumble dump on de grass-root whe' Anansi was. Anansi laugh "Tissin, tissin, tissin!"

An' Tiger jump 'pon Anansi, say, "We mus' go look wood gwine to bu'n your back!" Tiger see some good wood on a cotton-tree well dry, an' Tiger say, "I don' care wha' you do!"

An' when Anansi go tip on cotton-tree, him chop one of de limb pum! an' 'top, an' chop again pum! an' holla, "None!" Tiger say, "Cut de wood, man!" An' holla again, "None!" Tiger said, "Cut de wood, I tell you, come down mak I bu'n you." Anansi say, "You stan' upon de bottom say 'cut de wood, but you know Hunter-man look fe you las' yeah track? Wha' you t'ink upon dis yeah track worse!" an' Tiger run, Anansi say, "He run, Massa Hunter-man, gone up on hill-side, gone dodge!" He move from dere gone on ribber-side. Anansi holla, "Him gone, Massa Hunterman, a ribber!" Tiger wheel back. An' Anansi holla to him say go to a sink-hole, an' Anansi get rid of him an' come off.

Jack man dora!

b. The Gub-gub Peas.

George Parkes, Mandeville.

A man plant a big field of gub-gub peas.3 He got a watchman put there. This watchman can't read. The peas grow lovely an' bear lovely; everybody pass by, in love with the peas. Anansi himself pass an' want to have some. He beg the watchman, but the watchman refuse to give him. He went an' pick up an' old envelope, present it to the watchman an' say the master say to give the watchman. The watchman say, "The master know that I cannot read an' he sen' this thing come an' give me?" Anansi say, "I will read it for you." He said, "Hear what it say! The master say, 'You mus' tie Mr. Anansi at the fattest part of the gub-gub peas an' when the belly full, let him go.'" The watchman did so; when Anansi belly full, Anansi call to the watchman, an' the watchman let him go.

After Anansi gone, the master of the peas come an' ask the watchman what was the matter with the peas. The watchman tol' him. Master say he see no man, no man came to him an' he send no letter, an' if a man come to him like that, he mus' tie him in the peas but no let him away till he come. The nex' day, Anansi come back with the same letter an' say, "Master say, give you this." Anansi read the same letter, an' watchman tie Anansi in the peas. An' when Anansi belly full, him call to the watchman to let him go, but watchman refuse. Anansi call out a second time, "Come, let me go!" The watchman say, "No, you don' go!" Anansi say, 'If you don' let me go, I spit on the groun' an' you rotten!"4 Watchman get frighten an' untie him.

Few minutes after that the master came; an' tol' him if he come back the nex' time, no matter what he say, hol' him. The nex' day, Anansi came back with the same letter an' read the same story to the man. The man tie him in the peas, an', after him belly full, he call to the man to let him go; but the man refuse,--all that he say he refuse until the master arrive.

The master take Anansi an' carry him to his yard an' tie him up to a tree, take a big iron an' put it in the fire to hot. Now while the iron was heating, Anansi was crying. Lion was passing then, see Anansi tie up underneath the tree, ask him what cause him to be tied there. Anansi said to Lion from since him born he never hol' knife an' fork, an' de people wan' him now to hol' knife an' fork. Lion said to Anansi, "You too wort'less man! me can hol' it. I will loose you and then you tie me there." So Lion loose Anansi an' Anansi tied Lion to the tree. So Anansi went away, now, far into the bush an' climb upon a tree to see what taking place. When the master came out, instead of seeing Anansi he see Lion. He took out the hot iron out of the fire an' shove it in in Lion ear. An Lion make a plunge an' pop the rope an' away gallop in the bush an' stan' up underneath the same tree where Anansi was. Anansi got frighten an' begin to tremble an' shake the tree, Lion then hol' up his head an' see Anansi. He called for Anansi to come down. Anansi shout to the people, "See de man who you lookin' fe! see de man underneat' de tree!" An' Lion gallop away an' live in the bush until now, an' Anansi get free.

3. Tiger as Riding-horse

William Forbes, Dry River.

Tiger was walking to a yard an' see two young misses, an' he was courting one of de young misses. An' as Anansi hear, Anansi go up to yard where de young misses is; an' dey ax him said, "Mr. Anansi, you see Mr. Tiger?" An' said, "O yes! I see Mr. Tiger, but I tell you, missus, Tiger is me fader ol' ridin'-horse." An' when Tiger come to misses, dem tell him. An' said him gwine Anansi, mak him come an' prove witness befo' him face how he is fader ol' ridin'-horse!

An' when him come call Anansi, say, "Want you to come prove dis t'ing you say 'fore de misses," Anansi say, "I nebber say so! but I kyan' walk at all.," Tiger said, "If I hab to carry you 'pon me back, I will carry you go!" Anansi said, "Well, I wi' go." Anansi go tak out him saddle, Tiger say, "What you gwine do wid saddle?" Anansi say, "To put me foot down in de stirrup so when I gwine fall down, I weak, I can catch up." An' tak him bridle. Tiger say, "What you gwine do wid it?" Say, "Gwine put it in you mout', when I gwine to fa' down I can catch up." Tiger say, "I don' care what you do, mus' put it on!" An' him go back an' tak horse-whip. An' say, "Wha' you gwine do wid de horsewhip?" An' say, "Fe when de fly come, fan de fly." An' put on two pair of 'pur. An' say, "Wha' you gwine do wid 'pur?" An' say, "if I don' put on de 'pur, me foot wi' cramp." An' come close to yard an' close in wid de 'pur an' horse-whip, an' mak him gallop into de yard. An' say, "Carry him in to stable, sah! I mak you to know what Anansi say true to de fac', is me fader ol' ridin'-horse."

Tiger tak to wood, Anansi sing a'ter him, "Po' Tiger dead an' gone!"5

Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na bom, Eb-ry-bod-y (?)Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na bom, (?) Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na.Po' Ti-ger dead and gone, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na,Eb-ry-bod-y go look fo' dem wife, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na,Eb-ry-bod-y go look fo' dem wife, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na, Si-lay-na bom.

4. Tiger's Sheep-skin Suit.

George Parkes, Mandeville.

Anansi was a head-man for a man by the name of Mr. Mighty, who employed Anansi for the purpose of minding some sheep. The sheep numbered about two thousand. And from the first day Anansi took over the sheep, the man began to miss one. An' he steal them until he leave only one. Well, Mr. Mighty would like to find out how the sheep go. He say to Anansi he would give his best daughter and two hundred pound to find out how the sheep go.

Anansi say the best way to find it out is to make a ball. Anansi have a friend name of Tiger, call him 'Brar Tiger'. He went to Tiger an' tell him Mr. Mighty promise to give his daughter an' two hundred pound to whomsoever tell how the sheep go. Anansi now is a fiddler, an' he say that he will play the fiddle an' Tiger play the tambourine, but before he go to the ball he will give Tiger a sheepskin coat, sheepskin trousers, a sheepskin cap, a sheepskin boot; an' when him, Tiger, hear him play,

'Mister Mighty loss him sheep,It stan' lik' a Tiger t'iefee,"

him, Tiger, mustn't think him the same one; it's one clear out the country. And he is to play his tambourine, say,

"Fe tre-ew, bredder, fe tre-ew,it 'tan lik' a it mak me clo'es."

Now then, Anansi go back to Mr. Mighty an' tol' him that there is a man coming to the ball wearing a suit of sheep-skin clo'es,--dat is the man who steal the sheep.

Mr. Mighty give out invitation to all the high folks, all the ladies and gentlemen all aroun', to attend the ball at that same date. The night of the ball, Anansi went with his fiddle an' Tiger with his tambourine in the suit of sheep-skin clo'es. At the time fix, Anansi tune up his fiddle, 'he-rum, te-rum, she-rum.' Tiger now trim the tambourine, 'ring-ping, ring-ping, ring-pong, pe-ring-ping, double-ping, tong!' Anansi says, "Gentlemen an' ladies, ketch yo' pardner!" Anansi play,

"Mr. Mighty loss him sheep,Mr. Mighty loss him sheep,Mr. Mighty loss him sheep,Tiger say, It stan' lik' a Tiger t'iefee."

Tiger say,

"Fe tre-ew, bredder, fe tre-ew,Fe tre-ew, bredder, fe tre-ew,Fe tre-ew, bredder, fe tre-ew,It 'tan' lik' a it mak me clo'es."

Anansi go to Mr. Mighty an' say, "Me an' dat man workin' an' I didn't know he was such a t'ief! he steal de sheep till he tak skin an' all mak him clo'es!" An' as they were going back to their places Anansi say, "Hell after you t'-night, only t'ing you don't know!" Tiger say, "What you say, Bra'?"--"Me say, you not playing strong enough, you mus' play up stronger!"

Anansi say again, "Gentlemen an' ladies, ketch 'em a pardner!" an' sing,

"Mr. Mighty loss him sheep,It 'tan' lik' a Tiger t'iefee."

Tiger say,

"Fe tre-ew, bredder, fe tre-ew,It 'tan' lik' a it mak me clo'es".

Mr. Mighty got right up an' said to Tiger, "Yes, that is the man what steal all my sheep!" Tiger say, "No!!" Anansi say, "Yes, that is the man what steal all the sheep, an' I an' that man eatin' an' I didn't know that man was such a t'ief!" An' Tiger was arrested an' got ten years in prison, an' Anansi get the two hundred pounds an' the best daughter to marry to,

5. Tiger Catching the Sheep-thief

a. The Escape

Joseph Macfarlane, Moneague, St. Ann.

One day was an old lady name Mis' Madder, had twenty sheep. Mr. Anansi went an' gi' her a hen an', couple week after, Mr. Anansi went back fe de hen. An' said, "Didn't you gi' me de hen, Mr. Anansi?" An' said, "Oh, no! Missus, me hen wud have hegg, hegg, on hegg, chicken on chicken!" An' said, "De only t'ing I can do' Mr. Anansi, go in de sheep-pen an' tak a sheep!" It went on till de nineteen was gone, leave one. Tiger says, "Mis' Madder, I'll kill de sheep tak a half an' ketch Mr. Anansi." Tiger kill i', put 'e skin over himself. When Mr. Anansi come, Tiger bawl like a sheep "Ba-a-a-a!" Miss Madder say, "All right, Mr. Anansi, I don' wan' to hear any more talkin'; tak' de las' sheep an' go." Anansi say, "T'ank you, Miss Madder, won' come back an' worry you fe no more fowl!"

When he went off, under way said, "Yah! dis sheep hebby, sah!" Went home, de wife an' chil'ren sit roun' him wid bowl an' knife. Mr. Anansi tak de knife cut de t'roat an' say, "Lawd! me wife, dis fellow fat till no hav any blood!" Cut de belly come down, Tiger jump out hold him. Mr. Anansi say, "He! he! Brar Tiger, wha' you do?" Tiger say, "Miss Madder ha' twenty sheep an' if me no tie you, him wi' say you an' me eat dem." Anansi say, "If dem tak dem big banana trash tie me, I wi' be glad, but if dey could a tak dat 'itte bit o' banana t'read tie me, I should be so sorry!" An' dey tie him wid de small banana trash an' t'row into de sea, an' he jus' open his leg an' run under water. An' from dat time you see Anansi running under water.

b. The Substitute

Samuel Christie, St. Ann's Bay.

Anansi is a smart one, very smart, likes to do unfair business. So one day was walking t'ru a lady property an' kill a little bird; so him pass de lady yard an' say, "Missus, me beg you mak little bird stan' till me come back?" Lady said, "Put it down, Anansi." Lef' de bird an' he never come back till he know de bird spile. De lady t'row de bird. He come back, say, "Missus, me jus' call fe de litt'e bird me lef' t'odder day. Say, "Anansi, de bird spoil an' me t'row it away!"--"No, missus, you kyan' t'row 'way me bird! Jus' call an' me want i'!" Lady say, "Well, Anansi, before you ill-treat me, go in de sheep-pen an' tak a sheep."

Anansi was quite glad fe dat, get a sheep fe de bird! An' go down fin' a sheep-pen wid plenty of sheep. Anansi go an' tak dat one, an' after dat, ev'ry night he tak one. Lady fin' all de sheep was los', so tell de head man mus' keep watch of de sheep-pen. So de head-man was Tiger. Tiger tak out dat sheep was in de sheep-pen an' dress himself wid sheep-skin. Anansi have suspicion an' get a frien' to go wid him dat night, ask de frien' to catch de sheep. So as him frien' t'row on de rope on Tiger head, Anansi fin' it was Tiger an' him ask excuse, go to a good distance where can mak escape, holla, "Dat somet'ing you ketch deh no sheep,--Brar Tiger!"

Tiger tie de frien' carry him up to de yard tell de mistress dis is de man been destroying de sheep all de time!

c. In the House-top

Thomas White, Maroon Town, Cock-pit country.

Mr. Goolin pay Anansi a hundred poun' to mak him wife talk,6 an' Anansi was live upon Mr. Goolin ev'ry day an' go to Mr. Goolin yard ev'ry day fe money. Mr. Goolin get tired of Anansi an' couldn't get rid of Anansi out of him yard. Tiger hear, an' go to Mr. Goolin tell him dat him will stop Anansi from comin' in yard. An' so Tiger did; Tiger turn a big barrow an' go lie down in de common. Anansi come now an' say, "Mawnin', Mr. Goolin." Mr. Goolin say, "Mawnin', Mr. Anansi. "Anansi says, "I might well tell you de trut'! De amount of what money you pay me fe yo' wife, it is not enough!' Mr. Goolin says, "Well, I have no more money to pay you again." Anansi says, "O Mr. Goolin! you couldn't tell me a word as dat!" Mr. Goolin says to Anansi, "Mr. Anansi, all I can do fe you, go in de common see a big barrow lie down dere. You can go catch it."