Geography and Plays - Gertrude Stein - ebook
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One evening in the winter, some years ago, my brother came to my rooms in the city of Chicago bringing with him a book by Gertrude Stein. The book was called Tender Buttons and, just at that time, there was a good deal of fuss and fun being made over it in American newspapers. I had already read a book of Miss Stein's called Three Lives and had thought it contained some of the best writing ever done by an American. I was curious about this new book.My brother had been at some sort of a gathering of literary people on the evening before and someone had read aloud from Miss Stein's new book. The party had been a success. After a few lines the reader stopped and was greeted by loud shouts of laughter. It was generally agreed that the author had done a thing we Americans call “putting something across”—the meaning being that she had, by a strange freakish performance, managed to attract attention to herself, get herself discussed in the newspapers, become for a time a figure in our hurried, harried lives.My brother, as it turned out, had not been satisfied with the explanation of Miss Stein's work then current in America, and so he bought Tender Buttons and brought it to me, and we sat for a time reading the strange sentences. “It gives words an oddly new intimate flavor and at the same time makes familiar words seem almost like strangers, doesn't it,” he said. What my brother did, you see, was to set my mind going on the book, and then, leaving it on the table, he went away.

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Table of contents

THE WORK OF GERTRUDE STEIN

SUSIE ASADO

ADA

MISS FURR AND MISS SKEENE

A COLLECTION

FRANCE

AMERICANS

ITALIANS

A SWEET TAIL (GYPSIES)

I MUST TRY TO WRITE THE HISTORY OF BELMONTE

IN THE GRASS (ON SPAIN)

ENGLAND

MALLORCAN STORIES

SCENES. ACTIONS AND DISPOSITION OF RELATIONS AND POSITIONS

THE KING OR SOMETHING(THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO DANCE)

PUBLISHERS, THE PORTRAIT GALLERY AND THE MANUSCRIPTS AT THE BRITISH MUSEUM

ROCHE

BRAQUE

PORTRAIT OF PRINCE B. D.

MRS. WHITEHEAD

PORTRAIT OF CONSTANCE FLETCHER

A POEM ABOUT WALDBERG

JOHNNY GREY

A PORTRAIT OF F. B.

SACRED EMILY

IIIIIIIIII.

ONECarl Van Vechten

A PORTRAIT OF ONEHARRY PHELAN GIBB

A CURTAIN RAISER

LADIES' VOICES

WHAT HAPPENEDA FIVE ACT PLAY

WHITE WINESTHREE ACTS

DO LET US GO AWAYA PLAY

FOR THE COUNTRY ENTIRELYA PLAY IN LETTERS

TURKEY AND BONES AND EATING AND WE LIKED ITA PLAY

EVERY AFTERNOONA DIALOGUE

CAPTAIN WALTER ARNOLDA PLAY

PLEASE DO NOT SUFFERA PLAY

HE SAID ITMONOLOGUE

COUNTING HER DRESSESA PLAY

I LIKE IT TO BE A PLAYA PLAY

NOT SIGHTLYA PLAY

BONNE ANNEEA PLAY

MEXICOA PLAY

A FAMILY OF PERHAPS THREE

ADVERTISEMENTS

PINK MELON JOY

IF YOU HAD THREE HUSBANDS

WORK AGAIN

TOURTY OR TOURTEBATTREA STORY OF THE GREAT WAR

NEXT.LIFE AND LETTERS OF MARCEL DUCHAMP

LAND OF NATIONS.[Sub-title And Ask Asia]

ACCENTS IN ALSACE.A REASONABLE TRAGEDY.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF NATIONSORWHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT

THE WORK OF GERTRUDE STEIN

By SHERWOOD ANDERSON

One evening in the winter, some years ago, my brother came to my rooms in the city of Chicago bringing with him a book by Gertrude Stein. The book was called Tender Buttons and, just at that time, there was a good deal of fuss and fun being made over it in American newspapers. I had already read a book of Miss Stein's called Three Lives and had thought it contained some of the best writing ever done by an American. I was curious about this new book.My brother had been at some sort of a gathering of literary people on the evening before and someone had read aloud from Miss Stein's new book. The party had been a success. After a few lines the reader stopped and was greeted by loud shouts of laughter. It was generally agreed that the author had done a thing we Americans call “putting something across”—the meaning being that she had, by a strange freakish performance, managed to attract attention to herself, get herself discussed in the newspapers, become for a time a figure in our hurried, harried lives.My brother, as it turned out, had not been satisfied with the explanation of Miss Stein's work then current in America, and so he bought Tender Buttons and brought it to me, and we sat for a time reading the strange sentences. “It gives words an oddly new intimate flavor and at the same time makes familiar words seem almost like strangers, doesn't it,” he said. What my brother did, you see, was to set my mind going on the book, and then, leaving it on the table, he went away.And now, after these years, and having sat with Miss Stein by her own fire in the rue de Fleurus in Paris I am asked to write something by way of an introduction to a new book she is about to issue.As there is in America an impression of Miss Stein's personality, not at all true and rather foolishly romantic, I would like first of all to brush that aside. I had myself heard stories of a long dark room with a languid woman lying on a couch, smoking cigarettes, sipping absinthes perhaps and looking out upon the world with tired, disdainful eyes. Now and then she rolled her head slowly to one side and uttered a few words, taken down by a secretary who approached the couch with trembling eagerness to catch the falling pearls.You will perhaps understand something of my own surprise and delight when, after having been fed up on such tales and rather Tom Sawyerishly hoping they might be true, I was taken to her to find instead of this languid impossibility a woman of striking vigor, a subtle and powerful mind, a discrimination in the arts such as I have found in no other American born man or woman, and a charmingly brilliant conversationalist. “Surprise and delight” did I say? Well, you see, my feeling is something like this. Since Miss Stein's work was first brought to my attention I have been thinking of it as the most important pioneer work done in the field of letters in my time. The loud guffaws of the general that must inevitably follow the bringing forward of more of her work do not irritate me but I would like it if writers, and particularly young writers, would come to understand a little what she is trying to do and what she is in my opinion doing.My thought in the matter is something like this—that every artist working with words as his medium, must at times be profoundly irritated by what seems the limitations of his medium. What things does he not wish to create with words! There is the mind of the reader before him and he would like to create in that reader's mind a whole new world of sensations, or rather one might better say he would like to call back into life all of the dead and sleeping senses.There is a thing one might call “the extension of the province of his art” one wants to achieve. One works with words and one would like words that have a taste on the lips, that have a perfume to the nostrils, rattling words one can throw into a box and shake, making a sharp, jingling sound, words that, when seen on the printed page, have a distinct arresting effect upon the eye, words that when they jump out from under the pen one may feel with the fingers as one might caress the cheeks of his beloved.And what I think is that these books of Gertrude Stein's do in a very real sense recreate life in words.We writers are, you see, all in such a hurry. There are such grand things we must do. For one thing the Great American Novel must be written and there is the American or English Stage that must be uplifted by our very important contributions, to say nothing of the epic poems, sonnets to my lady's eyes, and what not. We are all busy getting these grand and important thoughts and emotions into the pages of printed books.And in the meantime the little words, that are the soldiers with which we great generals must make our conquests, are neglected.There is a city of English and American words and it has been a neglected city. Strong broad shouldered words, that should be marching across open fields under the blue sky, are clerking in little dusty dry goods stores, young virgin words are being allowed to consort with whores, learned words have been put to the ditch digger's trade. Only yesterday I saw a word that once called a whole nation to arms serving in the mean capacity of advertising laundry soap.For me the work of Gertrude Stein consists in a rebuilding, an entire new recasting of life, in the city of words. Here is one artist who has been able to accept ridicule, who has even forgone the privilege of writing the great American novel, uplifting our English speaking stage, and wearing the bays of the great poets, to go live among the little housekeeping words, the swaggering bullying street-corner words, the honest working, money saving words, and all the other forgotten and neglected citizens of the sacred and half forgotten city.Would it not be a lovely and charmingly ironic gesture of the gods if, in the end, the work of this artist were to prove the most lasting and important of all the word slingers of our generation!

SUSIE ASADO

Sweet sweet sweet sweet sweet tea.Susie Asado.Sweet sweet sweet sweet sweet tea.Susie Asado.Susie Asado which is a told tray sure.A lean on the shoe this means slips slips hers.When the ancient light grey is clean it is yellow, it is a silver seller.This is a please this is a please there are the saids to jelly. These are the wets these say the sets to leave a crown to Incy.Incy is short for incubus.A pot. A pot is a beginning of a rare bit of trees. Trees tremble, the old vats are in bobbles, bobbles which shade and shove and render clean, render clean must.Drink pups.Drink pups drink pups lease a sash hold, see it shine and a bobolink has pins. It shows a nail.What is a nail. A nail is unison.Sweet sweet sweet sweet sweet tea.

ADA

Barnes Colhard did not say he would not do it but he did not do it. He did it and then he did not do it, he did not ever think about it. He just thought some time he might do something.

His father Mr. Abram Colhard spoke about it to every one and very many of them spoke to Barnes Colhard about it and he always listened to them.

Then Barnes fell in love with a very nice girl and she would not marry him. He cried then, his father Mr. Abram Colhard comforted him and they took a trip and Barnes promised he would do what his father wanted him to be doing. He did not do the thing, he thought he would do another thing, he did not do the other thing, his father Mr. Colhard did not want him to do the other thing. He really did not do anything then. When he was a good deal older he married a very rich girl. He had thought perhaps he would not propose to her but his sister wrote to him that it would be a good thing. He married the rich girl and she thought he was the most wonderful man and one who knew everything. Barnes never spent more than the income of the fortune he and his wife had then, that is to say they did not spend more than the income and this was a surprise to very many who knew about him and about his marrying the girl who had such a large fortune. He had a happy life while he was living and after he was dead his wife and children remembered him.

He had a sister who also was successful enough in being one being living. His sister was one who came to be happier than most people come to be in living. She came to be a completely happy one. She was twice as old as her brother. She had been a very good daughter to her mother. She and her mother had always told very pretty stories to each other. Many old men loved to hear her tell these stories to her mother. Every one who ever knew her mother liked her mother. Many were sorry later that not every one liked the daughter. Many did like the daughter but not every one as every one had liked the mother. The daughter was charming inside in her, it did not show outside in her to every one, it certainly did to some. She did sometimes think her mother would be pleased with a story that did not please her mother, when her mother later was sicker the daughter knew that there were some stories she could tell her that would not please her mother. Her mother died and really mostly altogether the mother and the daughter had told each other stories very happily together.

The daughter then kept house for her father and took care of her brother. There were many relations who lived with them. The daughter did not like them to live with them and she did not like them to die with them. The daughter, Ada they had called her after her grandmother who had delightful ways of smelling flowers and eating dates and sugar, did not like it at all then as she did not like so much dying and she did not like any of the living she was doing then. Every now and then some old gentlemen told delightful stories to her. Mostly then there were not nice stories told by any one then in her living. She told her father Mr. Abram Colhard that she did not like it at all being one being living then. He never said anything. She was afraid then, she was one needing charming stories and happy telling of them and not having that thing she was always trembling. Then every one who could live with them were dead and there were then the father and the son a young man then and the daughter coming to be that one then. Her grandfather had left some money to them each one of them. Ada said she was going to use it to go away from them. The father said nothing then, then he said something and she said nothing then, then they both said nothing and then it was that she went away from them. The father was quite tender then, she was his daughter then. He wrote her tender letters then, she wrote him tender letters then, she never went back to live with him. He wanted her to come and she wrote him tender letters then. He liked the tender letters she wrote to him. He wanted her to live with him. She answered him by writing tender letters to him and telling very nice stories indeed in them. He wrote nothing and then he wrote again and there was some waiting and then he wrote tender letters again and again.

She came to be happier than anybody else who was living then. It is easy to believe this thing. She was telling some one, who was loving every story that was charming. Some one who was living was almost always listening. Some one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was telling about being one then listening. That one being loving was then telling stories having a beginning and a middle and an ending. That one was then one always completely listening. Ada was then one and all her living then one completely telling stories that were charming, completely listening to stories having a beginning and a middle and an ending. Trembling was all living, living was all loving, some one was then the other one. Certainly this one was loving this Ada then. And certainly Ada all her living then was happier in living than any one else who ever could, who was, who is, who ever will be living.

MISS FURR AND MISS SKEENE

Helen Furr had quite a pleasant home. Mrs. Furr was quite a pleasant woman. Mr. Furr was quite a pleasant man. Helen Furr had quite a pleasant voice a voice quite worth cultivating. She did not mind working. She worked to cultivate her voice. She did not find it gay living in the same place where she had always been living. She went to a place where some were cultivating something, voices and other things needing cultivating. She met Georgine Skeene there who was cultivating her voice which some thought was quite a pleasant one. Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene lived together then. Georgine Skeene liked travelling. Helen Furr did not care about travelling, she liked to stay in one place and be gay there. They were together then and travelled to another place and stayed there and were gay there.

They stayed there and were gay there, not very gay there, just gay there. They were both gay there, they were regularly working there both of them cultivating their voices there, they were both gay there. Georgine Skeene was gay there and she was regular, regular in being gay, regular in not being gay, regular in being a gay one who was one not being gay longer than was needed to be one being quite a gay one. They were both gay then there and both working there then.

They were in a way both gay there where there were many cultivating something. They were both regular in being gay there. Helen Furr was gay there, she was gayer and gayer there and really she was just gay there, she was gayer and gayer there, that is to say she found ways of being gay there that she was using in being gay there. She was gay there, not gayer and gayer, just gay there, that is to say she was not gayer by using the things she found there that were gay things, she was gay there, always she was gay there.

They were quite regularly gay there, Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene, they were regularly gay there where they were gay. They were very regularly gay.

To be regularly gay was to do every day the gay thing that they did every day. To be regularly gay was to end every day at the same time after they had been regularly gay. They were regularly gay. They were gay every day. They ended every day in the same way, at the same time, and they had been every day regularly gay.

The voice Helen Furr was cultivating was quite a pleasant one. The voice Georgine Skeene was cultivating was, some said, a better one. The voice Helen Furr was cultivating she cultivated and it was quite completely a pleasant enough one then, a cultivated enough one then. The voice Georgine Skeene was cultivating she did not cultivate too much. She cultivated it quite some. She cultivated and she would sometime go on cultivating it and it was not then an unpleasant one, it would not be then an unpleasant one, it would be a quite richly enough cultivated one, it would be quite richly enough to be a pleasant enough one.

They were gay where there were many cultivating something. The two were gay there, were regularly gay there. Georgine Skeene would have liked to do more travelling. They did some travelling, not very much travelling, Georgine Skeene would have liked to do more travelling, Helen Furr did not care about doing travelling, she liked to stay in a place and be gay there.

They stayed in a place and were gay there, both of them stayed there, they stayed together there, they were gay there, they were regularly gay there.

They went quite often, not very often, but they did go back to where Helen Furr had a pleasant enough home and then Georgine Skeene went to a place where her brother had quite some distinction. They both went, every few years, went visiting to where Helen Furr had quite a pleasant home. Certainly Helen Furr would not find it gay to stay, she did not find it gay, she said she would not stay, she said she did not find it gay, she said she would not stay where she did not find it gay, she said she found it gay where she did stay and she did stay there where very many were cultivating something. She did stay there. She always did find it gay there.

She went to see them where she had always been living and where she did not find it gay. She had a pleasant home there, Mrs. Furr was a pleasant enough woman, Mr. Furr was a pleasant enough man, Helen told them and they were not worrying, that she did not find it gay living where she had always been living.

Georgine Skeene and Helen Furr were living where they were both cultivating their voices and they were gay there. They visited where Helen Furr had come from and then they went to where they were living where they were then regularly living.

There were some dark and heavy men there then. There were some who were not so heavy and some who were not so dark. Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene sat regularly with them. They sat regularly with the ones who were dark and heavy. They sat regularly with the ones who were not so dark. They sat regularly with the ones that were not so heavy. They sat with them regularly, sat with some of them. They went with them regularly went with them. They were regular then, they were gay then, they were where they wanted to be then where it was gay to be then, they were regularly gay then. There were men there then who were dark and heavy and they sat with them with Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene and they went with them with Miss Furr and Miss Skeene, and they went with the heavy and dark men Miss Furr and Miss Skeene went with them, and they sat with them, Miss Furr and Miss Skeene sat with them, and there were other men, some were not heavy men and they sat with Miss Furr and Miss Skeene and Miss Furr and Miss Skeene sat with them, and there were other men who were not dark men and they sat with Miss Furr and Miss Skeene and Miss Furr and Miss Skeene sat with them. Miss Furr and Miss Skeene went with them and they went with Miss Furr and Miss Skeene, some who were not heavy men, some who were not dark men. Miss Furr and Miss Skeene sat regularly, they sat with some men. Miss Furr and Miss Skeene went and there were some men with them. There were men and Miss Furr and Miss Skeene went with them, went somewhere with them, went with some of them.

Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene were regularly living where very many were living and cultivating in themselves something. Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene were living very regularly then, being very regular then in being gay then. They did then learn many ways to be gay and they were then being gay being quite regular in being gay, being gay and they were learning little things, little things in ways of being gay, they were very regular then, they were learning very many little things in ways of being gay, they were being gay and using these little things they were learning to have to be gay with regularly gay with then and they were gay the same amount they had been gay. They were quite gay, they were quite regular, they were learning little things, gay little things, they were gay inside them the same amount they had been gay, they were gay the same length of time they had been gay every day.

They were regular in being gay, they learned little things that are things in being gay, they learned many little things that are things in being gay, they were gay every day, they were regular, they were gay, they were gay the same length of time every day, they were gay, they were quite regularly gay.

Georgine Skeene went away to stay two months with her brother. Helen Furr did not go then to stay with her father and her mother. Helen Furr stayed there where they had been regularly living the two of them and she would then certainly not be lonesome, she would go on being gay. She did go on being gay. She was not any more gay but she was gay longer every day than they had been being gay when they were together being gay. She was gay then quite exactly the same way. She learned a few more little ways of being in being gay. She was quite gay and in the same way, the same way she had been gay and she was gay a little longer in the day, more of each day she was gay. She was gay longer every day than when the two of them had been being gay. She was gay quite in the way they had been gay, quite in the same way.

She was not lonesome then, she was not at all feeling any need of having Georgine Skeene. She was not astonished at this thing. She would have been a little astonished by this thing but she knew she was not astonished at anything and so she was not astonished at this thing not astonished at not feeling any need of having Georgine Skeene.

Helen Furr had quite a completely pleasant voice and it was quite well enough cultivated and she could use it and she did use it but then there was not any way of working at cultivating a completely pleasant voice when it has become a quite completely well enough cultivated one, and there was not much use in using it when one was not wanting it to be helping to make one a gay one. Helen Furr was not needing using her voice to be a gay one. She was gay then and sometimes she used her voice and she was not using it very often. It was quite completely enough cultivated and it was quite completely a pleasant one and she did not use it very often. She was then, she was quite exactly as gay as she had been, she was gay a little longer in the day than she had been.

She was gay exactly the same way. She was never tired of being gay that way. She had learned very many little ways to use in being gay. Very many were telling about using other ways in being gay. She was gay enough, she was always gay exactly the same way, she was always learning little things to use in being gay, she was telling about using other ways in being gay, she was telling about learning other ways in being gay, she was learning other ways in being gay, she would be using other ways in being gay, she would always be gay in the same way, when Georgine Skeene was there not so long each day as when Georgine Skeene was away.

She came to using many ways in being gay, she came to use every way in being gay. She went on living where many were cultivating something and she was gay, she had used every way to be gay.

They did not live together then Helen Furr and Georgine Skeene. Helen Furr lived there the longer where they had been living regularly together. Then neither of them were living there any longer. Helen Furr was living somewhere else then and telling some about being gay and she was gay then and she was living quite regularly then. She was regularly gay then. She was quite regular in being gay then. She remembered all the little ways of being gay. She used all the little ways of being gay. She was quite regularly gay. She told many then the way of being gay, she taught very many then little ways they could use in being gay. She was living very well, she was gay then, she went on living then, she was regular in being gay, she always was living very well and was gay very well and was telling about little ways one could be learning to use in being gay, and later was telling them quite often, telling them again and again.

A COLLECTION

My Dear Miss Carey: A Story

There were little places to see Fernville, the town, the hospital, the lying in hospital, the sea-shore and the city.

Once we met my brother he was ringing a bell. He needed an umbrella but he would not buy it. I sent him one not prepaid. Oh yes the people are kind they all drink together. Even now. No not now. We are late.

Did you see the pear tree. It resembles the figs. They are often ripe. They grow in great abundance.

We like milk. My father likes milk and coffee.

Whenever there are flowers my mother is angry. She is even angry with me. That is to say she is generous enough and wishes everything back. We are all that way. My brother takes coal away in a little bag for use. All dark days are necessary. No permission is asked and it is given. For all day. For all day. Whenever it is needed. Not whenever it is needed. We do as we say it is best to do. Even religious people do so.

Come together in Fernville. Not I I thank you. My brother finds handkerchiefs there. For men. For men and for women. So does his wife. Many. Not very many. She brings them with her. Is that so. Many handkerchiefs are not necessary in Fernville. No indeed. We dismiss the church. We separate it. We have it to-day. A great many people call. On one another. Not altogether that. The post-office. The post-office of my brother. Now. Not now. Yes he is there now. Since the war. Yes since the war.

I remember when I was a b of c. I did not speak to old men then not when I was busy. I waited until I was tired and then we all sat down and had a cup of coffee. Coffee is very nourishing. I am very sensitive to the influence of coffee. So are we all.

Do you think that we are married. That we are all married. Mr. Weeks is married. He is going to be able to follow my advice. I advise him to go to my country. There he will do very well. The only advice I have to give him is never to live in the city. His wife does not like the city nor does she like a sunny climate. She is not able to go about with him. We are all of us leaving the end of the month.

Do not be angry.

I was very much surprised that water was the same color.

As what.

As the sun.

I feel that I must go at once.

Did you entirely forget about the other.

Drowning in water.

This is a question that I have never asked about because in the summer one does not think about it. Now it is winter but it is as warm as in summer.

Dear friends have a way of relating themselves to a town. We find in some districts that there are better ways of investing money. Some find that at the end of the war they are not able to continue paying on their houses.

Does this affect you.

Oh no because even if the father of my child is killed his sister will continue to give the money. She is obliged to by law.

This makes the whole matter very simple.

Not to me I have always been accustomed to it and have had some difficulty.

Yes we know we know that it is suddenly cold.

You are not pleased to see the sun setting. Indeed I cannot blame you.

Polybe in Port: A Curtain Raiser

Polybe in Port.

A hunter. He was not a hunter. He had a gun. I do not know whether they have permission to shoot.

Of course he must have if he has a gun. In this country they have a great many dogs who hunt rabbits. They run quicker.

We are surprised to see him.

Polybe is an ornament.

He is not thinner.

He likes the water now.

This I do not believe.

Neither do I believe there was any intention to go that way. Which way do you mean. Polybe does not remember. Me. Yes. The house. Yes. The servant. Yes. You are not mistaken.

We are not mistaken.

A great many shrubs every one of which are labelled.

Scene II.

A credit to me.

The cares and duties of a mother had been denied to Carrie Russell.

Polybe silent.

He said earnestly that it didn't matter.

Spanish Chattings

Do you keep books.

All weddings are back.

Pigeons.

Pigeons recognise persons. Do they. We saw them. They flew around.

Shooting pigeons is necessary. For what. For the sea.

I see old peppers that are dried. We do not complain. We say winds are violent and I do not wish them. Wish for them. I do not wish to see the stars. Call it out of here. You mean that pole. No indeed I don't mean Inca.

Oh yes certainly.

They Came Together

I can tell a little story. I cannot describe the character nor the color in the street nor the kind of a stone. A great many people have silver purses.

Wild Flowers

We collected wild flowers. We enjoyed it very much. In a window we saw exhibited the things that can be found in the country.

There was a satisfaction that we had the temporary installation which made it possible for us to ask another servant not to visit our servant. We did not do so. We were not neglectful of our best interests.

Will They Crush Germany

They will crush Germany. There is no doubt about it.

FRANCE

Likely and more than evenly, unevenly and not unlikely, very much that and anyway more, this is the left over method. There is nothing left because if it were left it would be left over. This does not make music. The time to state that is in reading. There is a beginning in a lesson in smiling.

What is up is not down and what is down is not reversing and what is refused is not a section and what is silenced is not speaking. This does not make the rude ones murmur, this does not make a penny smaller, this does not make religion.

All the time there is a melodrama there is monopoly and all the time there is more there is no excuse.

A luck in breaths is more to be denied than music, much more. The only long string is that which is not twisted. All the same there is no excuse.

A sight is not a shadow and a whole rise in a cry is not more piercing than danger of being mixed into an affair where there are witnesses. If writing is in little pieces and little places and a little door is open, many little doors are not open and writing is not surreptitious, it is not even obliging.

To show the difference between an occasion and merit and a button it is necessary to recognise that an honor is not forced so that there is no question of taste. To exchange a single statue for a coat of silk and a coat of wool is not necessary as there are appliances. A somber day is one when there is no pleading.

Made in haste, not made in haste, made in darkness, not made in darkness, made in a place, made in a place. The whole stretched out is not part of the whole block, the whole stretched out is so arranged that there is not stumbling but what is just as remarkable, pushing. An easy expression of being willing, of being hunting, of being so stupid that there is no question of not selling, all these things cause more discussion than a resolution and this is so astonishing when there is nothing to do and an excellent reason for an exchange, and yet the practice of it makes such an example that any day is a season.

To be sure that the trees have winter and the plants have summer and the houses painting, to be sure of this engages some attention. The time to place this in the way is not what is expected from a diner. The whole thing that shows the result is the little way that the balls and the pieces that are with them which are not birds as they are older do not measure the distance between a cover and a calendar. This which is not a question is not reverse and the question which is a question is at noon.

To question a special date is not mercenary. To answer a single servant is not obligatory. To be afraid is not nearsighted. An exclamation does not connect more grass than there is with any more trees than have branches. The special scenery which makes the blameless see and the solitary resemble a conversation is not that which resembles that memory. There is no necessity for furthering the regulation of the understanding. One special absence does not make any place empty. The dampness which is not covered by a cloth is not mingled with color. And it comes. There is no astonishment nor width.

Education, education, apprenticeship, and all the meeting of nephews and trains and changing papers and remaining when there is no chance to go there, all this occupied a whole sentence. It is a shame that there is not such an only use for that, it is a shame and there is no indignation more indignant. Everything is an indication of the simple remedy that is applied when there is no refusal and no application. Every thing which shows that is not tied with a string or any little string. All the same there is not much of a remedy.

Alarm over the action of the one who when he sees the light rise and the sun set and the stars shine and the water flow alarm is the same alarm as any alarm.

In all the same ways that pieces are separated in all these ways there are those placed things which are not pieces. They are not pieces and there is reason, there is reason in it because the whole thing shows such dissociation that all doing it for that purpose and together there can be no question but that they succeed.

A tobacco habit is one that a leaf does not enlighten and yet carelessness is so extraordinary. Supposing that the arrangement had been made and that it was agreed that no separation between any one being one and being another one could be established, supposing this were agreed and there was no conversation, would this enlighten any one, if it would why is the result so ambiguous. It is not ambiguous because the authority which does not authorise washing does supply soap. This does not make any change.

It is sensible to be around it is very sensible, it is so sensible that there is every way of stopping a selection, and then there is selection, there is a respect for resignation, there is no disturbance in a disappointment. The question is is there more urging than satisfaction, is there more distribution than renewal. This is not a question, it is a relaxing. And then the time comes for more noise. Is there then more noise. There is then reestablishment. Does that mean return of a price which is plentiful. Nobody knows. All this shows something it shows that there can be suspicion.

There is no separation in majesty. Terms, lines, sections, extra packing, nothing shows that confidence. All the same there is news. The time to stay away is in vacation. Why is there no place chosen. The answer is simple it consists in explaining that there has been given the use of all that will be used. This does not show feeling.

A curtain is not crazy, it has no way of being crazy, it has hardly a way of enraging a resemblance, it has no resurrection. Indeed the chances are that when there is seen more astonishment than anything that is placed it is very likely that the whole system will be not so much estranged as devastated and yet supposing they do not mean that, supposing they do say that it will be a success, supposing they do say does that mean that oration is contradiction, it does not.

Just a word to show a kite that clouds are higher than a thing that is smaller, just that word and no single silence is closer.

Suggest that the passage is filled with feathers, suggest that there are all together, suggest that using boxes is heavy, suggest that there is no feather, suggest all these things and what is result the result is that everything gets put away.

All the silence is adequate to a rumble and all the silliness is adequate to a procession and all the recitation is equal to the hammer and all the paving is equal to summer. All the same the detaining most is the reason that there is a pillar and mostly what is shocking is a rooster. This is not so easily said. There is no occasion for a red result.

Laugh, to laugh, all the same the tittle is inclinable. What a change from any yesterday.

A period of singular results and no gloom such a period shows such a rapid approach that there is no search in silence and yet not a sound, not any sound is searching, no sound is an occasion.

A fine fan and a fine closet and a very fine handkerchief and quite a fine article all these together shows where there has been plenty of rebuke and plenty of expectation and plenty, plentifully reduction of suspension, and so the season is the same and there is every corner.

No chance shows the rapidity of exchange, no chance and this which means one is the same as any two halves and this is not outrageous, not a bit outrageous it is simply the sign of splendor.

All the tempting and the chewing and the cloth all of it shows no sign and no symbol it does not and that is no disgrace.

If standing is an illusion is it necessary to be pressed to bend in that direction is it necessary and if it is necessary is it polite and if it is polite is it urgent and if it is not urgent is it an impulse.

No question has so much disturbance as the principal reunion. This is not so distinguished when there are no ties in the window. This is completely changed, once there were none and now there are none. There are no rebukes. A privilege is not painful. A recurrence is not artificial.

It is not separating that which satisfies no finger, it is not fading. What was it that was not wished. The reason is that the section is there and no reflection makes abundance. The only tangle is when there is abundance and there is abundance when there is pulling and piling. Does this seem to scream, it does not there is not even clustering and yet not hampering not singling everything does not make sorrow, it makes no plant grander, it does make a plant slender, it does not make it so slender that there is every size. All privilege and all practice, all suspicion and grandeur, all the timber and a little wood all this makes silver, paper is chosen and gold is cheap, does this make a little salt, it does not, it makes copper.

Little frame if it is cheaper than a big one is a different size. There is no use disputing as memory is a reminder.

Not to pay for a conversation, not to pay anything for any conversation, not to throw away paying, not to pass paying, not to pay anything this is not being a victim. What is victory, victory is that which eschewing liberation and a girdle and gratitude and resignation and a choice display and more flavor shows a strange reluctance to have a maritime connection. This is victory.

A license, what is a license, what is a license.

An angry coat, a very angry coat shines.

Butter is not frozen, this does not mean that there is no bravery and no mistake. This does show a conclusion.

Difference is no excuse, grain is no excuse, even the remains of a pear is an excuse and yet is there graciousness, there is if there is generosity. There is so much fruit. This is kindly a mistake. No misunderstanding is insurmountable.

Cage no lion, not to cage a lion is not dirty, it is not even merciless, it is not malodorous, it is not virtue.

To surround a giraffe, what does that mean. To surround a mixture, that means something.

Solid, what is solid, is more solid than everything, it is not doubtful because there is no necessity.

Haughtiness, there is haughtiness when there is no tape and no billiard rooms and no need to be secured from wet. There is certainly some selected obstacles.

The certainty of a change in the parts that speak, this uncertainty does not show as it does not fashion speech. All union is in the widow and all menace is in the band.

Any way to bend the hat is the way to encourage vice. Virtue all virtue is resolved and some and any hat, every hat is identical. A shadow a white shadow is a mountain.

Kindness what is kindness, kindness is the necessity of preserving of really preserving all the parts of speech and teaching, not music so much as trimming and a costume, and sincerely most sincerely shoving regions together.

Notice a room, in noticing a room what is there to notice, the first thing to notice is the room and the windows and the door and the table and the place where there are divisions and the center of the room and the rest of the people. All this is necessary and then there is finance.

Heavy where heaviness is and no mistake plentifully, heavy where the breeze is and no darkness plentifully, heavy where there is a voice and a noise and singling out a company, heavy where there is a sale of accents and raisins and possibly more ways of not being heavy. Certainly there is no peril and yet think, think often, is daintiness and a collar heavy is it and what is the disturbance, is there not more registration.

So there is not coming anything. There certainly is no single space useful and betrothed and vulgar and not pretty. There is a sign in placing nothing. This changes from day to day any day. Surely no change is a blessing. All the search is in violation and yet a single search is a single search willing. It is cautious. There is riot.

The likelihood of dipping and drawing and digesting and drinking and dirtying not dirtying smoking, the likelihood of all this makes such an order that every discussion is simultaneous. A large increase in beer, any large increase is here, some large increase is clear, no large increase is dear. A lily a very lily lily is accurate and described and surrounded and so venturesome that there is risk and writing, there is even inlaying.

Darkness, there is no darkness in extremity and in mixing and in originating scattering religion. There is no darkness in designing.

A group a single group proceeding show the necessity of the distribution of the same organization as there is if there is, assuming that there is, if there is reorganization.

Flower, flower and water and even more even a gram of grain and a single little blister, very likely the chance is not perfect and the exquisite arrangement has lace, very likely there are no stains and more likely there are ruffles. In all of this there is no use in practicing medicine. Quinine any quinine is useful and more there is more, there can be more, there is an apartment.

A sign of saving consists in spending the late morning in the morning and in urging in certainly not urging a calculation. A sign of saving is so simple if there is enough handed about, and surely no pains in piling are more shown than when everything is in dishes. This does not happen in an asylum, it does not even happen in the hay and in the double shapes that shelter cooking.

A top a tiny little top that sits and spits and shows the courage calmly, this this is so soon an exasperation and a piece of lightning, it is so ordinarily just that occasion, it is so kindly dispiriting, it is so haughty if there is pushing. There is pushing, this is what makes it repetition.

A long, what is a log to do when it floats, it is to do nothing as it floats but certainly it would be best that it should adjust that to itself certainly. This alone does not make an explanation.

A degree of resorts and a shining wave all this together does not make a regulation and it does not make that irregular, it sustains mischief and an order and it even enforces the likelihood of the season and some color. So sustained is a paragraph that a sentence shows no staring and some noise. This is so simple in the size that is medium and is medium sized sentinel. There is no kilometer. That does not make a sample.

Keep the place that is not open, close the place that has one door, shut the place that has a cellar, suffer where all suffer more, argue, and shelter the understanding orphan, and silence that is silence is not sufficient there must even be sleep.

Puzzle is more than a speck and a soiled collar. A pound is more than oat meal and a new institution. A silence is no more than occasional. It respects understanding and salt and even a rope. It respects a news-stand and it also it very also respects desert. All the ice can descend together.

Was there freedom, was there enchaining, was there even a height rising from higher. If there was what is a coat worth and by whom was it made when.

A lining any lining is a trimming. More trimming is extra.

A sort of arranging, a kindling of paying a shilling, does that mean another extravagance and more candles, no more candles. It does not show.

A famous single candle has a chance to shine so that glaring meant that no more would be reversed by lightning. The safe lamp and the bright lamp and the dirty lamp and the long lamp were all not the lamps that were attending baptism. Why is the baptism patient, baptism is patient in the first place because there is no coarse cloth, in the second place because when there is nothing taken enough is left to give every reason. A practice which engaged more attention than the rest was that which shaved a tame stopper and did not even end that. Supposing crossing a street is necessary, supposing it is, does that show more of such occasion. It does and it does.

A lime is in labor, a lemon is cooler, a citron is larger, a currant is redder, a strawberry is more vexed, a banana is straighter.

A little thing is a little thing, a single point is bigger, a bigger thing is a bigger thing, an older thing is older, an older thing is an older thing, a station is a station, a station is a station and a station is a thing and stationary only that is a stationary thing.

A blind being blind and deaf and deaf being deaf and blind and blind and deaf and a coat with a cape and more use in all than in any shape all this makes a reason for criticising the use of machinery and paper and even a pen and even a stamp and even more flags than ever.

In the pin in the picking of a pin, in sewing a little feather and avoiding deserting a pin, in retaining the feather and arranging to rank the pin as a pin and to hold it there where if it is seen it is found and if it is found it is seen, to not mark a pin and select a pin all this is a reason for using that way of waiting.

A standard blessed is a standard that is blue if it is blue and blue and white when it is blue and white. Supposing there is no money, supposing there is no dress and no skirt, supposing there is no window and no bed, supposing there is no more distribution and not any more violence, supposing there is not even arithmetic and intelligence, supposing there is a light and a round hole, does that mean that there is no success suggested. It does not. A little bit of choice makes a color regular. A little bit of black makes dinner necessary.

If there is a shape a real shape prettily, if there is and there is no wonder does it happen all the time, if it does not is there a certainty that there is collusion. These interesting questions crowd the house, they crowd, they do not crowd everywhere. They crowd separately.

All there is of more chances is in a book, all there is of any more chances is in a list, all there is of chances is in an address, all there is is what is the best place not to remain sitting and suggesting that there is no title for relieving rising.

An excursion, what is an excursion, an excursion is a picnic if it is recurrent, it is a picnic if there is no absence, it is a picnic and not necessarily, it is a picnic.

Black horses, very black horses are not peculiar, very large horses are not peculiar, very splendid horses are not peculiar, horses are peculiar regularly and with an awake resemblance to the best the very best description and regret. The kindness of this is mentioned and very often quite often the same rebuke is outrageous.

Not allowed, not only allowed to eat, to ache, to resemble, to project, to make a motion, to study preaching, to stumble on anything, to stretch audibly.

Not allowed a prize or a couch or even what is not necessary a searching, not allowed more formerly, not allowed more entirely, not allowed a dispensary.

It is a custom, it is a custom when it is not undue, when it is not undue, when it is not. It is a custom. It is a custom when it is more due, when it is, when it is an angle, it is not a custom, it is a custom altogether.

In cross and across, in that show and wide there is the sensory statement that there is night rule and a winter rule and even the chamber is empty and watches why are watches lighted.

What a day to pay to stay, what a day. When the work is done too soon and there is a crossing of hands and even of heads entirely when there is and when the rest is so awake, is there any slept out sleeping, there is not gradually, there is more chance than there would be in a colored collection. There is more chance certainly.

What is the resolution between a cutlet and an ingredient. It is mentioned and made in paper and floating.

What is the example of a miner. A single example is in the best of cups and also in the rest of the places and also in the show that is there.

After a mixed cloud is there any use in a trimming, there is, there is. There is a trimming behind in. There in no use. There is the case.

Calm, a calm, that calm, along the calm. This which is in the ell is so much are so. When and when and when is there. When the rail is the passage to. Through and so and much orderly.

Beginning to twining and sudden girls what is mended in a street, what is a rut in finnish. What is it in a market.

A considerable engagement, a considerable engagement.

Excuse the point that makes a division between the right and left that which is in the middle in between. Surprise an engagement, surprise it so that an agreement is all the time.

This is a way, this is a trout, this is the succession.

To linger in the pale way and not to show spots to be greener to do this means that all the references are what they are.

A pedal a pedal is that which when examined is made and this is no mistake in regularity it is a splendid thing.

Covering in and covering, covering with inside covering. Covering a lion with the same shape as the bear and yet what is the best measure for a tiger, what is the measure steadily.

A half safe wife and a whole safe wife and a half safe wife and a half safe wife.

A bet and sugar and a bet and within, a bet and within and a bet in within.

Cut a slice to show a pear, cut a slice to show a row, cut a slice and there is visiting. An angel is in the exchange.

Suppose that there is a cost, suppose that there is a beggar, suppose that there is a powder and a powder suppose there is a real gold mine.

A curly fate and a household fact and a gloom too soon, and a couple of necessary pockets.

Explain, explain why there is a shell fish and an oyster.

A pleasant little spot to have gold. The same spot is used for silver. The gold is the best way to keep it. The silver is the way to keep silver.

A cloud of white and a chorus of all bright birds and a sweet a very sweet cherry and a thick miss, a thick and a dark and a clean clerk, a whole succession of mantle pieces.

Conceal a nose and climb, counsel a name and shudder, believe a glass and relate, cool a pound and put in that.

Wednesday is a day and a closed begging is reasonable, reasonable, is reasonable, reasonable is reasonable.