EAST OF THE SUN AND WEST OF THE MOON and Other Moon Stories for Children - Various - ebook
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Contained within this volume are the stories of East of the Sun and West of the Moon, Monica the Moon Child and The Swan Maidens – all classic children’s stories from yesteryear which, even today, children want to hear and read. Also included are two poems which relate to the moon - The Man in the Moon and Hey Diddle, Diddle – which can also be considered classic children’s rhymes.While the stories are entertaining and enjoyable to read, the numerous illustrations will fire children’s imaginations and take them into fairy land, where, of course, anything is possible. Nowhere has this “firing of the imagination” been made more apparent than in the entertainments industry with the advent of Green Screen-CGI technology which has enabled big children’s imaginations to run wild and bring all sorts of apparitions to life - especially in the fairy and folk tales genre where we have seen a wholesome revival of interest.The most thoughtful, progressive educators and parents have come to recognize the cultural value of folklore and fairy tales, fables and legends, not only as means of fostering and directing the power of the child's imagination, but as a basis for literary interpretation and appreciation throughout life not to mention increasing the literacy ability of children.So, find that comfy chair, have your child snuggle in and set fire to their imagination with this short collection of MOON STORIES for CHILDREN.  10% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities,===============TAGS: Folklore, fairy tales, myths, legends, bedtime, children’s stories, fables, poems, poetry, moon, east of the sun, west of the moon, monica, moon child, swan maidens, man in the moon, diddle, rhymes, entertain, white bear, lassie, castle, north wind, east, south, west, fly, change, silver bell, brother, sister, moonship, balloon, prince, mother, father, kiss, thick wood, forest, old hag, bundle, princess, gold apple, long nose, winter, sleigh, craters, mountains, side of the moon, garden, babies, Gardeness, roses, gloom, face, nurse, hunter, clothes, marry, children, dress, king, queen, six sisters, dolphin, flew, seven Bends, seven Glens, Crystal Mountain, cow, jump, cat, fiddle, dish, spoon, ran away

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East of the Sun and West of the Moonand other Moon Storiesfor Children

Raising funds for Charities

Compiled & Edited by

John Halsted

Published byAbela Publishing, London[2018]

East of the Sun and West of the Moonand other Moon Stories for Children

Typographical arrangement of this edition

© Abela Publishing 2018

This book may not be reproduced in its current format in any manner in any media, or transmitted by any means whatsoever, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, or mechanical ( including photocopy, file or video recording, internet web sites, blogs, wikis, or any other information storage and retrieval system) except as permitted by law without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Abela Publishing,

London

United Kingdom

2018

ISBN-13: 978-X-XXXXXX-XX-X

email:

[email protected]

Website

www.AbelaPublishing.com

And then she lay on a little green patch in the midst of the gloomy thick wood.

Introduction

In recent years there has been a wholesome revival of interest in old and forgotten folklore and tales and the ancient art of story-telling. The most thoughtful, progressive educators and parents have come to recognize the cultural value of folklore and fairy tales, fables and legends, not only as means of fostering and directing the power of the child's imagination, but as a basis for literary interpretation and appreciation throughout life not to mention increasing the literacy ability of children.

This in turn, has given rise to a demand for the best material available in this genre. Some editors have gleaned from one field; some from several. It is the aim of this book to bring together only the very best from the rich cultural plethora of folklore, and forgotten folklore which is now available.

In preparing the stories for publication, the aim has been to preserve, as much as possible, in vocabulary and idiom, the original folklore language, and to retain the conversational style of the teller of tales, in order that the sympathetic young reader may, in greater or less degree, be translated into the atmosphere of the old-time story-hour.

John HalstedAbela Publishing

The Man in the Moon

(Anon)

The man in the moonCame down too soon,And asked the way to Norwich.

He went by the south,And burnt his mouthWith eating cold pease porridge.

Man in the Moon (1872)

The Man in the Moon came down too soon.

East of the Sun and West of the Moon

Once on a time there was a poor husbandman who had so many children that he hadn’t much of either food or clothing to give them. Pretty children they all were, but the prettiest was the youngest daughter, who was so lovely there was no end to her loveliness.

So one day, ’twas on a Thursday evening late at the fall of the year, the weather was so wild and rough outside, and it was so cruelly dark, and rain fell and wind blew, till the walls of the cottage shook again. There they all sat round the fire, busy with this thing and that. But just then, all at once something gave three taps on the window-pane. Then the father went out to see what was the matter; and, when he got out of doors, what should he see but a great big White Bear.

“Good-evening to you!” said the White Bear.

“The same to you!” said the man.

“Will you give me your youngest daughter? If you will, I’ll make you as rich as you are now poor,” said the Bear.

Well, the man would not be at all sorry to be so rich; but still he thought he must have a bit of a talk with his daughter first; so he went in and told them how there was a great White Bear waiting outside, who had given his word to make them so rich if he could only have the youngest daughter.

The lassie said “No!” outright. Nothing could get her to say anything else; so the man went out and settled it with the White Bear that he should come again the next Thursday evening and get an answer. Meantime he talked his daughter over, and kept on telling her of all the riches they would get, and how well off she would be herself; and so at last she thought better of it, and washed and mended her rags, made herself as smart as she could, and was ready to start. I can’t say her packing gave her much trouble.

“Well, mind and hold tight by my shaggy coat, and then there’s nothing to fear,” said the Bear, so she rode a long, long way.

Next Thursday evening came the White Bear to fetch her, and she got upon his back with her bundle, and off they went. So, when they had gone a bit of the way, the White Bear said:

“Are you afraid?”

“No,” she wasn’t.

“Well! mind and hold tight by my shaggy coat, and then there’s nothing to fear,” said the Bear.

So she rode a long, long way, till they came to a great steep hill. There, on the face of it, the White Bear gave a knock, and a door opened, and they came into a castle where there were many rooms all lit up; rooms gleaming with silver and gold; and there, too, was a table ready laid, and it was all as grand as grand could be. Then the White Bear gave her a silver bell; and when she wanted anything, she was only to ring it, and she would get it at once.

Well, after she had eaten and drunk, and evening wore on, she got sleepy after her journey, and thought she would like to go to bed, so she rang the bell; and she had scarce taken hold of it before she came into a chamber where there was a bed made, as fair and white as anyone would wish to sleep in, with silken pillows and curtains and gold fringe. All that was in the room was gold or silver; but when she had gone to bed and put out the light, a man came and laid himself alongside her. That was the White Bear, who threw off his beast shape at night; but she never saw him, for he always came after she had put out the light, and before the day dawned he was up and off again. So things went on happily for a while, but at last she began to get silent and sorrowful; for there she went about all day alone, and she longed to go home to see her father and mother and brothers and sisters. So one day, when the White Bear asked what it was that she lacked, she said it was so dull and lonely there, and how she longed to go home to see her father and mother and brothers and sisters, and that was why she was so sad and sorrowful, because she couldn’t get to them.

“Well, well!” said the Bear