Choose. Believe. Win. - Dr. Robert C. Worstell - ebook
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What is Winning?The Secret That May Surprise YouThis seems rather obvious, but it isn't necessarily. What you consider "winning" will depend on how you've been trained since birth and the mindset you've stacked as a result.Before we get into the more serious nuts and bolts of how this works, let's go over a very simple datum: nothing is as it seems at first glance.Look at a race. Thousands enter a marathon. Only one is first. He's the winner. What are the rest called? Also-rans.Olympics are different. They have thousands who compete worldwide, and only their best national winners are sent to the world competition. There, they compete against each other in various challenges until the final point where awards are given only to the first three winners.We call them winners and they may get a cash prize, but who is making the real money from their success? The sponsors.Back to that marathon. Who is the big winner? The race sponsors. The people who sell supplies to the runners. The people who have hotel rooms for rent to visitors. The people who create and market collectibles to the visitors. The restaurants that supply food to all these people. Those are all winners, too.In the Olympics, certain sports are in big demand by the viewing and reading audiences. So the corporate media can be winners if they can get the exclusive contract for the broadcasting and can then sell enough advertising to cover their expenses. (Doesn't always happen.) And the Olympics aren't always profitable themselves.Winning is what you say it is. But all winning has also-rans who were there as well as the crowd who watched. What was the difference? Mindset.Those competitors who came in first are those who had a certain mindset to succeed. They are exceptional successes, whether or not they set a new world's record.The people who made a sizable increase in income from any sporting event are exceptional successes, too. If they didn't take the risk, they wouldn't have made that extra income. That also takes a certain mindset.It's no coincidence that the majority of the richest people on this planet either didn't finish college, never went, or attended something other than an Ivy League university. They think differently, they have stacked their mindset differently. They have become routinely exceptional successes.(From Chapter 1)If you want routine exceptional success in your life, you're going to have to know how to choose, believe, and win.Get Your Copy Now. 

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Choose. Believe. Win.

Achieveyour Goals, Realize Your Dreams, and GetEverything You Want Out of Life.

By Dr. Robert C. Worstell

Copyright © 2017 Midwest Journal Press. All Rights Reserved.

“Mindset Stacking” is a trademark and service mark owned by Midwest Journal Press.

Contains excerpts from “The Strangest Secret Library” – available online and through your local bookstore.

Introduction

Of course, this happened at 3am when I was otherwise trying to stay asleep.

It was decades in the making. Literally. I've been working at this all of my adult life, and probably since I was 8 years old. Trying to make sense of the world and how people acted in it. Because that was when I saw that people who were brought up the same would act completely differently. And public schooling just brought out those differences rather than resolve them.

The contrast was the farm I was raised on. Most grain crops grew the same, most grass grew the same. If it didn't, then you could figure out what was different. Animals were slightly different, more complicated. But they didn't act that differently one to another.

But people were completely different. Sisters reacted differently than each other, brothers even more so. A big family of kids, lots of examples to study.

As I got into junior high and then high school, the differences became wider. They segregated by grade scores, and most classes assigned seats alphabetically. Usually 35 kids to a class, normal in those days. We were the boomer kids, and one of the largest classes going through.

It was there I found out that bright people could act stupidly. Illogically. And people in general didn't always say what they meant, but said what they were supposed to. Teachers and textbooks didn't have answers. The system that was churning out “educated” students wasn't doing more than getting you ready for a job. They weren't interested in solving humanities difficulties.

Decades afterwards, nothing I'd uncovered changed that observation. But once free of having go to school and their lock-step training, I was able to study anything I wanted.

Once the Internet came around, it meant I could study books without having to accept the limited amount any local library could have on their shelves. Google became a real doorway to the world.

I got scammed a few times. Learned how to publish my own books, how to blog, how to research, and live to write about it.

The books I published gave me a clue, as the booksales showed what I should be studying, as they were popular and sold, so rewarded my continuing research.

This narrowed my efforts to the Strangest Secret Libary, a collection of books that Earl Nightingale recommended in his Gold recording. Those books called to me, became sirens to my inspiration and curiosity about the humankind I was part of.

Recently, these researches took a fascinating turn.

They finished.

Just like that. Done.

The rest of the dust motes needing to be swept are in the form of application. Putting this stuff to work.

This book, then, is probably the last in a series of books, papers, and blog posts going back over a decade. And I was tempted to do a full marketing campaign on all this, along with a course to really generate some additional passive income -- but then I realized that being “done” also means you're heart isn't in it any more.

It was due to that 3am wakeup call I got.

But let me explain that in the first chapter, as we were just about to get into the meat of it...

Part I - How the Successful Think Differently to Win.

What is “Winning”?

This seems rather obvious, but it isn't necessarily. What you consider winning will depend on how you've been trained since birth and the mindset you've stacked as a result.

Before we get into the more serious nuts and bolts of how this works, let's go over a very simple datum: nothing is as it seems at first glance.

Look at a race. Thousands enter a marathon. Only one is first. He's the winner. What are the rest called? Also-rans.

Olympics are different. They have thousands who compete worldwide, and only their best national winners are sent to the world competition. There, they compete against each other in various challenges until the final point where awards are given only to the first three winners.

We call them winners, but who is making money from their success? The sponsors.

Back to that marathon. Who is the big winner? The race sponsor. The people who sell supplies to the runners. The people who have hotel rooms for rent to visitors. The people who create and market collectibles to the visitors. The restaurants that supply food to all these people. Those are all winners, too.

In the Olympics, certain sports are in big demand by the viewing and reading audiences. So the corporate media are winners if they can get the exclusive contract for the broadcasting and can then sell enough advertising to cover their expenses. (Doesn't always happen.) And the Olympics aren't always profitable themselves.

Winning is what you say it is. But all winning has also-rans who were there as well as the crowd who watched. What was the difference? Mindset.

Those competitors who came in first are those who had a certain mindset to succeed. They are exceptional successes, whether or not they set a new world's record.

The people who made a sizable increase in income from any sporting event are exceptional successes, too. If they didn't take the risk, they wouldn't have made that extra income. That also takes a certain mindset.

It's no coincidence that the majority of the richest people on this planet either didn't finish college, never went, or attended a non-Ivy-League college or university. They think differently, they have stacked their mindset differently. They have become routinely exceptional successes.

Now let's look at the also-rans and everyone else who doesn't even bother to compete...

The "Real" World, Fake News, and the Hero's Journey

You might want to pick up some of my earlier books to catch up with some of this theory, but let me summarize a bit.

It all started with Earl Nightingale and his Strangest Secret recording. Actually, he says there that this one concept has been racketing down the annals of time and being "discovered" by all sorts of people over and over. And they each thought they had found something new:

"We become what we think about."

And that traces back to the oldest surviving philosophy on this planet (some call it “Huna”) where their wise men put their knowledge into the language itself. Their take on this was:

"The world is what you think it is."

All of these statements actually say the same thing in different ways. Listen to that recording (I've also included a partial transcript in the 2nd part of this book) and you'll get the gist of this.

The Recurring Numbers Game

Another point Nightingale mentions is this recurring split point of 95% muddling along through life and 5% being outrageously successful. You can see this split happening in different studies.

One U.N. sponsored study said that 1% controlled about 50% of the world's wealth (and that includes anyone who is a millionaire.)

The Social Security Administration says that about 90% are receiving payouts.

Only about 3% take advantage of Veteran Administration education benefits.

For any advertising, a 2-4% click-through is considered very good.

While only 3% of 3% of 3% actually get the full benefit of any online training - or about 1 in 10,000. (Those are the ones you see on infomercials to promote those courses.)

But look those data over for yourself and find your own statistics. All I'm saying here is when you keep an eye out for recurring data, you may be able to find this particular breaking range.

A recent election for President brought up a wide gap in attitudes about life and living. It shouldn't have been any real surprise, since on average the office trades parties every two years. The problem is that the media was pushing one candidate hard and forecasting that she would win in a landslide. But she didn't. And the reports of false votes was estimated at about 3 million nationwide, which was about what she won the popular vote by. Meanwhile, the few recounts requested found widespread voter fraud in the states that supposedly didn't have any.

Anyway, that all goes on and on. (Sorry if you got triggered by that. )

The other point that came up was fake news. A handful of tiny sites learned they could make income online by making up "news" about the candidates and selling ads along with the news. Now these sites weren't mainstream, and got few followers. And their total income wasn't enough to support a family on.

But when this was touted as how the winner won, then chasing down this type of news resulted in the corporate news media itself getting two black eyes. People started scrutinizing the corporate news they were getting, only to find that it wasn't always true.

To be fair, only 30% of the reading public thought the corporate news was true to begin with. But after this, polls found that trust in corporate news had dropped to below what people thought of Congress, lawyers in general, and used car salespeople.

My own research found that you could only determine what was fake news for yourself. "Eye of the beholder" kind of approach. Fake news inside the metropolitan areas wasn't fake news in rural areas, and vice-versa.

(My Make Yourself Great Again series and Mindset Stacking™ articles have given tools so you could find and deal with fake news all on your own. So I won't rehash those here. )

Enter the Hero's Journey and Copywriting

This idea launched a short book (Why We Got All This Stuff) and it covers this point.

The shorthand explanation is that most people use Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey (monomyth) as a common plot in the entertainment they like to watch, read, and listen to.

Campbell came across this while comparing the popular legends and myths, along with Jungian psychology, to explain how one plot explained these (The Hero with a Thousand Faces.)

Later Chris Vogler (The Writer's Journey) pushed this as money-making approach that Disney and others used to create their blockbusters. The Star Wars franchise was originally written based on that concept, but a lot of other movies utilized this as well.

And then the datum surfaced that we watch these movies and engage with this entertainment so we can compare our own lives with those stories. We compare our own character, in all its flaws and powers, with the lead character (and sometimes the villain.)

Copywriting came in when I was starting to dust off an old book I was studying and found that marketers had been using symbols for years to get us to buy stuff. And then I remembered that the Jungian archetypes were symbols, as well as just about everything in that monomyth. The light bulb went on.

Marketing was exploiting our own storylines, in order to sell their products. Whether we actually needed that stuff or not. They made us think that we did. They were selling us symbols to remind us of the journey we were on.

Again, Why We Got All This Stuff tears this apart in more detail.

What is new to this is that the truly exceptional successes don't fall into that. Because they think differently than the other 95%...

Why Our Exceptional Successes Don't Do Monomyth

We finally get to the 3am wakeup call...

I'd gotten a suspicion days earlier that maybe that monomyth only applied to the 95%. I didn't know for sure, but it was something to keep track of on a “back burner”.

The idea that the exceptionally successful think differently is roundly written up in Make Yourself Great Again. The shorthand is that the successful study the true successes and so take books like Think and Grow Rich seriously. Most of them find it hard to work for anyone else or even have a job at all. And the mindset of an entrepreneur is very different from the regular 9-5 job seeker.

But you have to do a lot of research to find out why. Most books on this area just skim the surface and are frankly just some inspirational hype and otherwise dull how-to manuals on mechanical actions. (More marketing hype to get you to buy stuff.)

The soul of the matter only became clear when the above idea surfaced.

Earlier, as covered in Make Yourself Great Again, the idea that resilient mindsets being based on systems instead of arbitrarily stacked dogma was floated. Most people accept "facts" as given. They accept "conventional wisdom" which is seldom true, even if repeated broadly and written up in textbooks and broadcast by corporate news media.

"Truth," according to that oldest philosophy referred above, "is as valuable as it is workable."

And that is part of figuring out what fake news is, or anything fake. Does it work? Can anyone get it to work, to get the promised results from it?

Exceptional successes don't think the same way the bulk of humanity does.

If the bulk of humanity uses the monomyth to sort out their lives, then there must be a different model.

At 3am, I was given a clue. You already know part of it: the exceptional successes think in systems.

Now, there is an old saying you have probably heard, "If you find out which way everyone is going and go the opposite way, you'll be right 90% of the time."

If the Hero's Journey is about going on a quest in the world and being transformed, then what is the opposite of that?

Transforming the world without moving.

Ok, let's back up again. Just hold that last thought for now.

If you want to be successful, you have to study the successful. You have to boil down what they do, how they act, how they think. And emphasis is again on that last point. How. They. Think.

W. Clement Stone was a successful person before he was given a copy of Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich. That book enabled Stone to rocket his income by finalizing a personal philosophy of success. Stone has the legend of taking $100 and turning into $37 million.

Earl Nightingale had worked himself into being a top announcer at one of the top radio stations in the country by 1949. He'd been there just a little over a year when he ran across a copy of Think and Grow Rich at a bookstore in Chicago. Reading that weekend, he ran across his famous "We become what we think about" in a later chapter of that book. It's not stated exactly that way in the book, but this was the tipping point for Nightingale to make sense of what he had been studying in many references up to that point. Nightingale used what he learned in that book to double his income in a month. Then tested it again to double his income again in the month after that.

Nightingale retired from broadcasting in his late thirties to run the businesses he had started.

James Buchanan Jones was working through his degree in a college while giving lectures about Hill's Success Philosophy for the Napoleon Hill Foundation in his spare time. He was also studying other books related to this. Finally, he knew there needed to be a test. Getting about $10,000 from friends on top of the three mortgages on his home and the loan on his car, he started a business from his living room. Four years later, he had built a nationwide business which was generating ten-figure income in the early 1950's. In 1956, he published a book on the subject and his own methods. This was the same year the Strangest Secret recording was first pressed. It became an “instant bestseller”.

No, the secret to how the successful think isn't in just this one book by Hill. The point is that people who think differently can get a copy of the same book and then radically improve their income. The point is to narrow down to how people think and what Hill put in that book that made it so effective.

The majority of the people who are successful have actually read Hill's book, if you took a survey. Many, many people credit this book with their success or at least partially to what they learned from that book.

Let's now go back to thinking in systems. Systems are resilient. They can rebound because no one point determines the condition of all the others directly. Simply stacking a lot of data up in some order will make a failed stack if any of this data is proved false in any way. Everything has to work.

But the problem is conventional wisdom again. Because it's accepted because it matches earlier beliefs. And accepted without testing, wholesale.

Do you see how there could be so many people despondent and even emotionally violent after they put all their faith in a candidate who lost? Their world view collapsed. Because they stacked their beliefs on static “facts” and some of these were proved false.

If these same people thought in terms of some of these political prognosticators, then they could have stepped back a bit. Like the trend that each party tended to hold office for 8 years at a time (since FDR, anyway.) And the trend of one candidate having a runaway outcome during their party's primaries. Lots of factors there.

Add in the fact that newspapers and other media have been commonly found to be lying since the first printed version (even Ben Franklin stretched the truth in his paper.) Then you could see that if the papers and digital press were all in camp for one candidate, predicting a landslide victory in spite of the other factors, that they just might be lying like they always had.

And that would allow you to have a different reaction than a complete meltdown, and violent riots. Disappointment, sure, but not a mental crash.

Because you would be operating with a more resilient mindset.

How does this explain the exceptionally successful?

The exceptionally successful tend to test everything they come across. They look for breakout data which isn't ordinary. They look for exponential response. They take risks to test data and systems in order to come up with the most resilient.

They think in systems, not with static data. They constantly look for what everyone else is missing and then test what they find to see if it can be utilized for a breakthrough, to disrupt the existing status quo and provide exceptionally better service (and so rake in exceptional higher income.)

What would such a system look like if graphed?

Exceptional Success Graphed

Anything can be sketched. If it can't be sketched, then you might have a problem building it.

Let's look at the conventional Hero's Journey:

There's a great explanation on Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hero%27s_journey#Campbell.27s_seventeen_stages)

The exceptional successes do this backward. Instead of the hero making a journey and getting changed as a result, in their success model, the world is the one that goes through changes.

Hill

I covered in Make Yourself Great Again how Napoleon Hill had a 13-element system in his book:

Practically, it was just twelve elements which assisted the core idea.

Nightingale

Let's take the "Strangest Secret" and see if that will give us a graphable system:

Those points are straight quotes from his talk.

Stone

W. Clement Stone published his "The Success System That Never Fails" in 1961. Here's his system:

(See chapter 13)

Brande

Another book recommended by Nightingale in his recording was Dorothea Brande's Wake Up and Live:

Note: Hers seemed to be based on the three elemental urges a person encounters in life, and her one solution as a credo. Again, we have only the single book to use as a guide.

Bristol

Claude M. Bristol had a bestseller in his Magic of Believing, another book referenced by Nightingale. But you really have to also study his TNT: It Rocks the Earth to distill all the points of his system:

Jones

James Buchanan Jones laid his system out in just four points in his own bestseller If You Can Count to Four: