Bound to Find Freedom - Theresa Linden - darmowy ebook
Opis

Step into the dystopian world of the Chasing Liberty trilogy. A thirteen-year-old colony boy, who lives outside the boundaries of the government-run city of Aldonia, has grand visions of joining his older brother and the others who work for the cause of freedom. If only his parents would stop holding him back.

Ebooka przeczytasz w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS
czytnikach certyfikowanych
przez Legimi
Windows
10
Windows
Phone

Liczba stron: 41

Odsłuch ebooka (TTS) dostepny w abonamencie „ebooki+audiobooki bez limitu” w aplikacjach Legimi na:

Androidzie
iOS

Contents

FREE Book Offer

Story

https://theresalinden.wixsite.com/chasingliberty

BOOKS BY THERESA LINDEN

CHASING LIBERTY TRILOGY

Chasing Liberty

Testing Liberty

Fight for Liberty

WEST BROTHERS SERIES

Roland West, Loner

Life-Changing Love

Battle for His Soul

Standing Strong

NEW ADULT FICTION

Anyone But Him

SHORT STORIES

“Bound to Find Freedom”

“A Symbol of Hope”

“A Battle for the Faith”

“Made for Love” (in the anthology Image and Likeness: Literary Reflections on the Theology of the Body)

“Full Reversal” (in the anthology Image and Likeness: Literary Reflections on the Theology of the Body)

“The Portrait of the Fire Starters”

(in the anthology Secrets: Visible and Invisible)

AUTHOR’S NOTE

This short story introduces my dystopian Liberty trilogy. Dedrick is a minor character here, but he is a main character in the trilogy. And his brother Andy, the main character of this story is a minor character in the trilogy. Granted, he is very active and causes a bit of trouble, especially in the second book. Sarkin is another character you get to meet here and learn more about in the second and third books of the trilogy. I hope you enjoy this short story. You are welcome to read the first story for free too. And finally, this book is dedicated to

BOUND TO FIND

F R E E D O M

By Theresa Linden

A SHORT STORY CONNECTED TO THE LIBERTY TRILOGY

Arms folded and attitude growing inside him, Andy watched his mother wrestle with a sheet on the clotheslines. He swung his hands to his sides and let out a heavy sigh. Minutes ticked by. He needed to get going. Why did Mom have to be so unreasonable?

“Andy, you are not your brother. And when your brother is home, when he’s not out leading pilgrims to one of the colonies, he helps out around here without complaining.” Squinting at the setting sun then at Andy, Mom yanked dry pillowcases off the clothesline with a vengeance.

“No, he doesn’t. He’s always doing his own thing.” He snatched a hammer and nails that he’d left lying on the ground, deciding to get them before Mom said something about them. Then his gaze landed on the bright orange flare gun. He’d gotten in the habit of taking it along on his little adventures, just in case.

“Well, he is twenty years old. You’re thirteen, you have certain responsibilities, and this family relies on you.”

“No, I don’t have certain responsibilities.” Andy stooped by the toolbox he’d left by the raised garden beds and tossed the hammer into it. He’d spent the day under the hot sun, redoing the branches on the roof, the camouflage. “I get all the responsibilities no one else wants. I’m like your slave.”

Mom groaned and grabbed the last of the laundry from the line, her third and final hanging. Summer sun dried the clothes quickly, but Mom seemed to wash three times as much as she did in the winter. She was always doing laundry. “. . . as if you have no idea what everyone else does around here.”

“I know exactly what everyone does. But, just like Dedrick, I have my own things that I want to do, too. I’m not a little kid. I have my own life.” Glancing to make sure Mom didn’t see, he stuffed the plastic flare gun, barrel first, into the back of his jeans waistband.

“You can do what you want after you do what you’re told. Within reason.” Mom hefted the laundry basket and lugged it toward the back door. “I want that fence around the hen house repaired before the sun goes down.”

Andy jumped up and faced her, pulling his shirt down over the gun so she wouldn’t see it. “Aw, come on. I need the sunlight to ride the dirt bike. I won’t be gone that long, and I can use lanterns for light when I work on the hen house.”

Mom exhaled and rolled her eyes as she passed. “Why can’t you just do what you’re told when you’re told to do it? Your father gave you the choice yesterday: go with him on the hunting trip or help with chores around here. And he specifically told you to fix that screen.” She pivoted the basket to her hip and reached for the handle to the screen door.

Andy reached past her and opened it for her, real gentleman-like. “I’ll fix it tonight but I need the sun to ride. So can I?” Refusing to take no for an answer, Andy gave her his best disarming smile.

Mom’s exasperated moan told Andy he’d won, even before she said, “Go ahead, but don’t be gone for hours.”

“Thanks, Mom.” He reached inside, snatched his canvas jacket from a hook on the wall, and let the screen door bang shut.