As a man thinketh - James Allen - ebook
Opis

This is the extended annotation including an essay called "James Allen: A prophet Of Meditation". This little volume (the result of meditation and experience) is not intended as an exhaustive treatise on the much-written-upon subject of the power of thought. It is suggestive rather than explanatory, its object being to stimulate men and women to the discovery and perception of the truth that- "They themselves are makers of themselves." by virtue of the thoughts, which they choose and encourage; that mind is the master-weaver, both of the inner garment of character and the outer garment of circumstance, and that, as they may have hitherto woven in ignorance and pain they may now weave in enlightenment and happiness.

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As a man thinketh

James Allen

Mind is the Master power that moulds and makes, And Man is Mind, and evermore he takes The tool of Thought, and, shaping what he wills, Brings forth a thousand joys, a thousand ills:— He thinks in secret, and it comes to pass: Environment is but his looking-glass.

Contents:

James Allen: A Prophet of Meditation

As a man thinketh

Foreword

1. Thought and Character

2. Effect of Thought on Circumstances

3. Effect of Thought on Health and the Body

4. Thought and Purpose

5. The Thought-Factor in Achievement

6. Visions and Ideals

7. Serenity

As a man thinketh, J. Allen

Jazzybee Verlag Jürgen Beck

86450 Altenmünster, Germany

ISBN: 9783849623791

www.jazzybee-verlag.de

[email protected]

Cover Design: © James Steidl - Fotolia.com

James Allen: A Prophet of Meditation

Although the late James Allen, of Ilfracombe, is comparatively unknown, yet to thousands of seekers after truth, he has proved a guide, philosopher, and friend.  One of his works, “As a Man Thinketh”, has gone into no less than eleven editions; surely proof that he has a considerable vogue.  The most casual reader of any of his works cannot fail to be impressed by the simplicity, cheerfulness, and benevolence which seem to radiate from the soul of the writer.  We cannot place James Allen in any exclusive category, as he teaches so much that harmonizes with all the best thought of our age.  Liberal Christians, Theosophists, and many other enlightened bodies of truth-seekers may claim him as an exponent of at least several of their distinctive views; be he was simply a strong, true, individual man who wrote and spoke out of the depth of his own convictions, and never held himself bound to voice the peculiar tenets of any cult. Wide knowledge of the Scriptures of the world, professedly sacred and other, coupled with intense sympathy with all human causes have rendered his works a delight to the scholar, as well as an inspiration to the less cultured aspirant for instruction in that path of wisdom which inevitably leads to power and peace.  His literary style is clear and simple, and in dealing with subjects that are often vague and illusory, he used language that made his meaning easily understood.  James Allen disliked publicity, and, perhaps, it is because of his disregard of the uses of advertisement that he is not so well known as he might otherwise have been.  After all, however, it is the man’s message that matters, and he who runs may read in the James Allen Library the story of the spiritual life of the writer.  The worship of the personality was a thing that he always guarded against, and for that reason his body was cremated and his ashes scattered to the four winds of Heaven, so that no man or woman in the future could make a place of pilgrimage of his grave, or say “the dust of James Allen lies here.:  His books alone are monuments to his memory, and they are being sent with the utmost speed to all the corners of the earth, and are being translated into various languages.  “The Eight Pillars of Prosperity” has just been published in the Spanish tongue.

James Allen was born in Leicester on November 28th, 1864.  His father was at one time a very prosperous manufacturer, but evil days overtook him when James was about fifteen years of age.  Nearly everything was lost, and Allen, senior, taking what money was left, went to America to make a new home for his wife and family, but within two days of his arrival in that country he met with an accident and died in a New York hospital.  His empty pocket-book and an old silver watch were returned to the family as the only things found upon him.  James now found himself in his native town of Leicester, at the age of fifteen, with a mother and two younger brothers to support.  He worked as many as fifteen hours a day in a factory, but never gave up his beloved books.

Mr. Allen states that at the age of seventeen, he found his father’s Shakespeare, of which he became an ardent reader.  “I read Shakespeare,” he himself has said, “in the early morning, at breakfast time, in the dinner hour, and in the evening.”  He knew the whole of the plays by heart ultimately, and could lose himself in them when surrounded by hundreds of workmen and by the whir and thud of machinery.

Then came Emerson’s Essays, calm and radiant, revealing to him a higher realm than that of the passions with their fleeting pleasures and certain pains.  “Circles,” “Compensation,” “The Over-Soul,” and “Self Reliance” were the essays which impressed him most, particularly “Self Reliance,” which showed him the importance of conduct and the worth and dignity of character.  It helped him to battle successfully with natural timidity, which put a check on initiative and originality.