Archipendium 2014 -  - ebook

Archipendium 2014 ebook

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Opis

Archipendium 2014 shows 365 days full of modern architecture. 365 projets are explained by a photograph, a drawing and a text. Studios from around the world have sent in projetcs. Archipendium therefore is an overview of the latest production of modern architecture. Small creative office as well as established architects firms use the calendar as a showcase for their work. The foreword is written by the prominent architect Cino Zucchi. More information at www.archipendium.com oder www.archi-maps.com Archipendium 2014 zeigt 365 Tage Architektur. 365 Projekte direkt von Architekten begleiten durch das Jahr. Ein großartiger Überblick über das zeitgenössische Architekturgeschehen.

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Impressum

Copyright: © 2013 Gerd Kaiser, Nils Peters

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Index

Introduction

The Landscape of Time

Like an “Exquisite Corpse”—the famous collective art technique invented by André Breton and his friends—the images on the Archipendium 2014 form together an infinite landscape. The casual juxtaposition between two successive pages follows a “jump-cut” fashion, but as the series progresses one can statistically infer the customs and habits of contemporary architectural culture.

In the old atlases or geography textbooks, the different features of each country were summarized by concentrated icons depicting costumes, buildings, landscapes: Switzerland with white-topped mountains, still lakes, cheese forms, cows and cowbells; Holland with windmills, tulips, ladies with clogs and funny hats; Mexico with mariachi, sombreros and Aztec pyramids. Omitting the boring and dull “in-between”, their collection showed the amazing variety of material cultures, a vast mosaic of colors and shapes testifying our will to give form to our environment, to create “events” and “places”.

Architecture is the background of our daily activities, and is perceived in a state of distraction. But we need icons to understand the world, to recognize its geography, to picket a number of fixed points from which we trace our daily paths. Paul Valéry once said that Art is what transforms Arbitrium into Necessity. The bright features of the architectures depicted in Archipendium form a constellation of spatial possibilities of our design culture, showing our wonderful capacity of transforming the continuum of Time into a “calendar” of seasons and days, the continuum of Space in a geography of regions and places.

Cino Zucchi

Water-Moon Monastery I Artech Architects Taipei I Taiwan I 2010 – 2012

When asked of what his vision for the future temple would be, Master Sheng Yen, the founder of the Monastery and Dharma Drum Buddhist Group, answered that he “sees” the temple in his meditation dhyana, “It is a Flower in Space, Moon in Water,” he said. “Let’s name it the Water-Moon Monastery.” Thus began the Water-Moon Monastery. Situated on the vast Guandu plain, facing the Keelung River and with the Datun Mountain as its backdrop, the design takes advantage of its natural surroundings and strives to build a tranquil spiritual place. After passing through two walls of different heights that serve as buffer from the expressway outside, upon entering the temple, visitors face the view of the Main Hall that sits at the far end of a80-meter long lotus pond. The reflections on the pond of the over-sized colonnades and the flowing golden drapes in between create a scene of illusory quality. Using architectural concrete as the main material, the design reduces the color and form to a minimum, conveying the spirit of Zen Buddhism. The lower part of the Grand Hall is transparent, giving it an impression of its upper wooden “box” being suspended in theair. On the west side of the Grand Hall, a massive wooden wall is carved with the famous “Heart Sutra” in Chinese characters. As the lights shine through the carved-out characters, the space is infused with an aura of culture and spirituality. Outside the long corridor, the characters of the “Vajracchedika Prajnaparamita Sutra” are cast void on the prefabricated GRC panels, providing additional religious meaning while functioning as sunshades. When the scripture is imprinted onto the interior surface by the sunlight, it is as if the Buddha’s teaching, in an unspoken manner, is revealed.

Circolare , Ecole Del Rusco I Ciclostile Architettura Bologna I Italy I 2012

For the fourth edition of Ecole del Rusco: the exhibition about art and recycling in Bologna, was set up an artistic and sensory journey through the squares of the city, with five installations by young designers, dedicated to the touch, sight, taste, hearing and smell. The temporary art installation “Circolare” is a project of landscape using products made with recycled materials compared with the same materials in their original form. The dialectical opposition between the waste raw material in its original form and the object?made from it has the dual function of showing concrete results from a recovery action and to stimulate the tactile curiosity of the public who can verify personally the effect of such recovery. The containers that collect the protagonists of this dialogue are big spheres that symbolically through their shape indicate the circular process of the recycling act.

Tudela - Culip Restoration Project I EMF + Ardèvols Consultors Cap de Creus I Spain I 2010

The project is related to an important aspect of what landscape architecture is about, namely identifying, unveiling and eventually transforming a site, to fit with what is already there. Revealing & celebration “the real” landscape and its specificities. Indeed, the project’s goal was not to build or un-build, a landscape but to conceive the conditions for its experiencing. To do so, the process involved in-depth site reconnaissance and precise on-site cartography making. During the 5 years process, the designers walked more than 200 km on site, took and studied more than 15,000 images, and received up to 50 specialists in different fields related to nature restoration, in search for ways to optimize deconstruction, nature dynamic reclamation, and social valorization. The commission was approximated as an open process, enabling flexibility to integrate the discoveries following deconstruction. For instance the solution to enhance a “Pegmatite” outcrop at the entrance was found and negotiated with the builder during work. Constructively a minimalist approach was taken, reducing materials to those on site plus Cor-ten steel, for its landscape integration and its resistance to sea exposure, and using only few consistent construction details repeated through the site. ‘Robustness’ for a landscape that accepts little domesticities.

Umeå Art Museum I Henning Larsen Architects Umeå I Sweden I 2011

The Art Museum, Bildmuseet, at Umeå University is situated at the new Arts Campus by the Umeälven river. The campus also comprises the Academy of Fine Arts, the Institute of Design and the new School of Architecture. The consolidation of artistic institutes and exhibition facilities is based on a close collaboration between various companies with a view to allow art, design and architecture to benefit from one another. Umeå’s position as a centre of art and education is strenghtened with a new silhouette by the river. In its previous facilities, the museum has displayed international contemporary art and classic art-historical exhibitions side by side since 1981. The new museum more than doubles the exhibition area and, with its protruding, visible location by the river, it will become a new landmark in the area.

The tower comprises three exhibition halls placed upon each other—with inserted floor plans featuring the auditorium, children’s workshops and administration. The large, square exhibition halls are free from structural elements and offer ample daylight, let in through niches in the façade. This creates a vibrant and dynamic framework for the various exhibitions. As the other buildings at the Arts Campus, the facade features vertical louvre panelling in Siberian larch, which supports the verticality of the building—only broken by the large windows and the glass floor in the middle.

Apartment House Johannisstraße 3 I J. MAYER H. Architects Berlin I Germany I 2012

The design for the apartment house reinterprets the classic Berliner residential building with its multi-unit structure and green interior courtyard. The sculptural design of the suspended slat facade draws on the notion of landscape in the city, a quality visible in the graduated courtyard garden and the building’s silhouette and layout. Plans for the ground floor facing the street also include a number of commercial spaces. The generously sized apartments will face south-west, opening themselves to a view of the calm courtyard garden. Spacious, breezy transitions to the outside create an open residential experience in the middle of Berlin that, thanks to the variable heights of the different building levels, also offers an interesting succession of rooms. The units’ varying floor plans and layouts indicate a number of housing options; condominiums are organized into townhouses with private gardens, classic apartments or penthouses with a spectacular view of the old Friedrichstadt.

Tata Compact + Apartment I logon urban .architecture. design Jiaxing I China I 2012

Tata Compact + Apartments located in Jiaxing near Shanghai. They provide small, affordable compact + apartments with a modern, contemporary design for young & ambitious singles and couples. 5 former office buildings were transformed into apartment buildings with a special user concept: the compact + apartments. Small but efficient single units provide a comfortable, flexible layout with a “+” on community areas. Two buildings host community functions connected to outdoor activity spaces. Designed as energy efficient units with double glazed windows and insulated facades, also featuring sun shading. With layouts from 28 to 80 qm the project is positioned as a green LOHAS* community. Not only the users benefit from the transformation of the dull, grey and rather ugly office buildings into new, modern and green apartment buildings, but also the surrounding area strongly benefits from the upgrade of the project.

Secreto I PASCAL ARQUITECTOS : Carlos Pascal and Gerard Pascal Chimalistac I Mexico City I Mexico I 2011

Secreto is a contemporary house in a residential colonial area in Chimalistac, Mexico City. The area where Secreto is located has a historic colonial character untouched by the unorganized sprawl that has occurred elsewhere. The design tries not to blend in the context, but it also keeps elements of the language of the past. The goal in the design is to achieve an interaction between the inside and the outside, a natural transition from the historical outside to the modern interior. As part of the architectonic discourse, and also for reasons of durability and maintenance, very few finishes were implemented, being concrete one of the most used materials for this project , because it does not age or decay, and because it acquires more dignity and history with the time. The result is a house with open spaces where events are articulated by natural light and views from the garden.

Thom Mun Community Center I Project Little Dream Takeo I Cambodia I 2012

Thom Mun Community center is situated west of a small town called Takeo in Cambodia. The center’s main function is to provide free classes to children but is also available for everyone in the village. The design concept is to allow for the community to freely engage in different activities around the vicinity. To reflect this, bamboo panels were used in replacement of traditional brick walls. The permeability of the panels allows for visual interaction, blurring the boundaries between the interior space and the outdoor environment. The pathway separating the two classrooms leads down to a lake where the children often go for either recreational activities or to relax and have fun. The commencement of construction began in December 2011 and with the help of 38 volunteers, 21 staff members and local craftsmen the center was completed in 22 days.

Moganshan Golf Course Club House I Rocco Design Architects Moganshan I Hangzhou I China I 2013

The development is adjacent to the infamous summer retreat Moganshan—area—and involves an 18-hole golf course, 10 low-density residential plots and 6 medium to high-density residential plots. The club house design strives to create a landmark of simplicity and subtlety a floating translucent cube. The—aluminum screen encloses boxes of different volumes and materials, alluding to its rich content and character. The central atrium separates the western hotel box and the eastern public zone, while creating a visual vista towards the northern hill scenery as well as allowing daylight penetration.

Drexel University Athletic Center I Sasaki Associates, Inc. Philadelphia I USA I 2010

The Drexel campus straddles both sides of Market Street in Philadelphia’s University City section. Sasaki’s addition to the Daskalakis Athletic Center (DAC), a 1960s-era athletic complex, accomplishes several institutional and programmatic goals. It increases the university’s visual presence along Market Street, integrates existing and new buildings into a unified complex, and groups all of the recreation facilities into a new building wing. The new building wraps around two sides of the DAC building, providing a new urban presence along Market Street. The main façade is treated as a large glazed screen with meandering folds shaded by the extension of the building’s floors. At street level, the building interacts with the passing urban scene. Paving patterns echo the angular folds of the building, a café is placed among trees preserved and integrated into the design, and a restaurant engages the larger community as well as students. A previously nondescript corner is brought to life through the combination of a landscaped plaza and the center’s climbing wall framed in glass—a further outward expression of a building housing dynamic activities.

The Spreewald Spa Hotel I 4a Architekten Burg I Germany I 2012

Nature, wellness and design—these were the guiding principles for 4a Architekten when constructing the Spreewald Spa Hotel in Burg. Situated in the heart of the Spree Forest next to the SpreewaldTherme spa, also planned and built by 4a Architekten as early as 2005, this 4-star hotel offers its guests a feel-good atmosphere to relax in since its opening in December 2012. The concept for the hotel is based on the architects’ extensive experience in giving rooms an atmospheric effect along with the aspiration to construct a functional, long-lasting and simultaneously aesthetically pleasing building. With regard to the hotel s colour design, the architects have consciously chosen different colours than those of the SpreewaldTherme spa. The Spreewald Spa Hotel offers outstanding living quality for guests during their stay as well as functionality and therefore excellent orientation, providing an ambience of well-being with its modern design, natural building materials and great comfort.

New Synagogue I kister scheithauer gross Ulm I Germany I 2012

In 2009, the Israelite Religious Community in Württemberg (IRGW) decided to build a new synagogue for its orthodox community in Ulm and, together with the city of Ulm, initiated a competition. The city placed the building site in the middle of the Weinhof, just a stone’s throw from the former synagogue, which was destroyed during Kristallnacht. In the completed build, the cuboid is lower and shorter than initially planned during the competition. It is now 24 meters wide, 16 deep and at17 meters high, much lower than the nearby Schwörhaus. All the spaces of the community centre and the synagogue are joined in the smooth structure: foyer, synagogue, Mikvah (ritual bath), meeting hall, school and administrative rooms as well as the child day care centre with an enclosed outdoor playing area, which is directly above the sacral room. The rooms are arranged orthogonally. Only the synagogue follows the line of the only, free-standing support in the building, in a diagonal direction. The direction facing south-east has an overlying religious meaning behind it: ist geographical direction is directly towards Jerusalem, the spiritual and religious centre of Judaism. The diagonal room layout creates a corner window in the sacral room, which plays with a pattern of the Star of David as a space framework. With 600 openings, the synagogue is illuminated from many points, with the focal point being the liturgical centrepiece; the Torah shrine. The perforations in the façade created with a high-pressure water jet, illuminate the shrine inside and project the idea of the synagogue outwards.

House MAR I n - lab architects , Frédéric Nosbusch Luxembourg I Luxembourg I 2013

This single-family house in a suburb of Luxembourg-City is based on views—interior and exterior. The relationship between the different spaces inside and outside the building create asymmetric plans and different angles trough out the whole house. The facade is covered in aluminum-panels. The main interior materials are stone, oak and glass.

Orchard House I Studio Octopi Calne I UK I 2011

Orchard House was commissioned to create a lasting piece of responsive architec­ture that was not defined by the client’s use of a wheelchair. The courtyard house was designed to Level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes. Located on the site of a former walled kitchen garden, landlocked and accessed only by a track from the main road, the house and gardens form a sequence of enclosures that unfold revealing a private interior world. The house is of timber frame construction super insulated with sheep’s wool insulation. The shallow plan, careful alignment of windows and a double height gallery allow views to cut across the building to the various gardens enabling multiple readings of the space. In the orchard, three old fruit trees are planted in an arrangement that suggests a fourth once stood between them. The missing tree now forms the focal point of the central courtyard.

Rax ahoy! I ARTEC Architekten Vienna I Austria I 2013

A building complex with flexible use was to be created. The two main entrances look onto the road connected with halls and corridors that possess natural light. A super-elevated glass staircase dominates Vienna’s corner Raxstraße/Gußriegelstraße. The single-storey apartments are endued with loggias along the whole façade as privacy shield. Because of the translucent metal fabric of the façade the building complex appears light and textile. A large part of the ground-floor is flex space, mostly used for commercial purposes. The viewing platform available for all residents is located at the level of Wiener berg.

Auditorium PPS , RWTH University I Hentrup Heyers + Fuhrmann Aachen I Germany I 2012

The Auditorium Centre was finished in autumn 2012. The building stands on Professor-Pirlet-Straße in a triangular area south-west of a multi-storey car park belonging to the university. It includes two lecture halls, 5 CIP pools and one lecture room. The handicapped accessible centre is designed for 1,074 students. The building lies on a hillside with up to 4 meters in height variation. This and the steep slope leading down to the car park were significant factors in the design. A visual dominance in comparison to the multi-storey car park is achieved by increasing the height of the right part of the building. The front face of the building and the street form a triangular square. In addition, a small, tree-lined area leading to Turmstraße was created. The building front consists of sand colored bricks laid. The classrooms are light and friendly designed. A guidance system was created inside of the build­ing by painting selected walls with warm bright colours.

Movie Theater Weltspiegel I SAF Studio Alexander Fehre Cottbus I Germany I 2012

With more than 100-year-old history, the movie theater “Weltspiegel Cottbus” is one of the oldest cinema buildings of Germany and has stamped many childhood memories. A local enthusiast asked Studio Alexander Fehre to conceive a new overall concept for the former single-hall cinema and to give it a coherent interior design. Now two additional film halls with 80 places in each and a film bar belong in the annexe to the building. The historical hall with 520 places and a golden ceiling was utilised by a retractable platform also for events. By an exciting and universal interior design with references to the early film history an exciting merging of history and modern age succeeded.

Karuizawa Museum Complex I Yasui Hideo Atelier Karuizawa I Japan I 2011

The traditional element of Japan like origami and the artist’s modern side were harmonized with the line of a sharp ridgeline like Mt. Yatsugatake and Asama-yama of Japanese famous mountains which wraps in a site, and designed the new architectural type in response to environment. The construction which imitates a sharp ridgeline and consists of geometrical forms like origami is realized in the form where both the heterogeneous things of a straight line and a curve face nature, contrasted with the art museum which united with nature of the author who is a Japanese-style painter itself. The shade of the light with which it is reflected to the wall and roof of the titanium alloyed zinc variously bent from the ground while the glass with which the façade of the architecture built in Nature inclined in all the directions reflects the surrounding green responds to the surrounding mountain range.

Bar La Bohème I AVA Architects Porto I Portugal I 2011

The Bar “La Bohème” (entre amis) is located in the “Galeria de Paris” street, amidst the downtown area of Porto. The redesign sought to implement and structuralize the space, creating its own identity. The solution was formalized through the texture and the colour of the wood, which defines the space and provides depth to the structure’s design. This structure, which was placed along the corridors and namely at the walls and ceiling, allows to subvert the whole appearance of the space, appealing to its visitors sense of discovery. The bar spans three levels: the main floor, basement and a mezzanine. The latter establishes a visual relationship with the main floor. The bar counter is located at the main floor’s bigger span, next to the entrance door and public access. The previously adopted functional solution was maintained, although we opted to change the (only) existing counter’s location in order to give it a larger dimension, functionality and space for its customers. The involving wooden structure was maintained on the lower level (basement) as to create uniformity with the main floor, and a large wine showcase was added. The building’s facade is clad in granite ashlar. We assumed that the previous window frames were made of solid wood, as to the resemblance of some existing adjacent buildings. Changes made to the façade were solely at the level of framework and entrance span, combining an “Afizélia” wood (natural colour) with colourless laminated glass. The proposed functional solution seemed more appropriate for the establishment’s new areas of operation and organization. The composition and design of the elements in the framework were formulated taking into account the interior design of the space, while introducing rhythm by drawing vertical uprights. This also ensured some security, preventing the installation of security systems previously installed.

Academie MWD I Carlos Arroyo Dilbeek I Belgium I 2012

The Academie MWD sits at a uniquely varied crossroads; South: the main square; North: Wolfsputten, a protected forest; West: CC Westrand, a Brutalist community centre; and East a series of quaint suburban villas. Architect Carlos Arroyo had a distinct challenge: erecting a building with a quality of its own, which makes sense from all four directions. Arroyo carefully modulates scale and form: the jagged edge of the roof mimics those of the homes across the street, growing gradually to the cantilevered auditorium at the other end, and rising up to look face to face towards the monumental volumes of CC Westrand. Image and texture dematerialise the volume: the façade seems to blend into the forest. The building changes dramatically as we move along the sidewalk; walking towards the forest, we see forest; walking towards the grey Westrand we see greys, whites and blue skies. Looking straight into the façade, we see the colours of a painting by A. Hoppenbrouwers, the architect of neighbouring Westrand.

The Dome for Floriade 2012 I ZENDOME Venlo I The Netherlands I 2011

Floriade 2012—the largest and most important gardening exposition in the world takes place once every 10 years in the Netherlands. The mission was to inform and welcome the over 2 million international visitors from April to October 2012 to the 66 hectares of exhibition grounds with its theme gardens and pavilions in an extraordinary way. The agency DST Experience communication, Sky-Skan and ZENDOME worked together intensively from the idea to the realization of the 300 qm large geodesic dome with a specially developed vacuum membrane for perfect 360° projections. Inside a silver mobile cupola a fulldome film helped making the Floriade theme world an immersive experience right after checking in. The fact that the easily deconstructable dome could be moved without any negative effects for nature to be used at the next event was another clear example of the quality of the mobile architecture.

House of Generations I Gerhard Mitterberger Austria I 2012

As opposed to the improvements of the last century, the retirement home of our current times—owing to several restrictions—develops back into the infirmaries of the 19th century. Due to the high level of the residents’ care dependency, there is a lack of vitality in their everyday lives. The aim of this house is to create a generation-spanning environment. Centre piece of the facility is a special-care home with 41 beds, just big enough to be run economically and small enough to enable family-like groups and individual care. Additionally, there are 14 appartments that are connected to the care home. The “living room” of these appartments is a lounge on the ground floor with a large sun deck. The architectural design meets the demand for “diffusion”: The rooms fluently blend into each other. They are transparent and open to the public spaces. Living zones, lounges and internal “streets” replace common corridors.

Moravian Church Amsterdam ZO I 70F architecture Amsterdam I The Netherlands I 2013

The commission for this building started as early as 2006. After a long design process, along with extensive design meetings with the principal, the design was ready to be presented to the strict supervising committee of the municipality. Supervisors Ton Schaap and Michael van Gessel where praising in their final conclusion: “The church is in its tough plasticity and reluctant use of materials a big plus for this part of Amsterdam.” The building is simple in its definition. The entrance and the kitchen have become the focus of the church. Adjacent to the left and right you will find the meeting hall and the main church hall. Above the meeting hall, on the first floor you will find the flexible meeting rooms. The main church hall itself has a balcony on the first floor. The rest of the first floor is an open space, with a from 9 meters and up ascending roof. This space ends in a 13 meter high light tower; a light roof light spanning the full with of the venue, allowing for indirect sunlight. Light and the colour white are of great importance to the liturgy of the Moravian church. The daylight that enters the main church hall through the roof is the key element of the whole building. It defines the introduction of the visitor to the main church hall. On top of that, the building function as a light-beacon to the surrounding area. The main entrance with its high glass façade always emits light, giving a strong “welcome” signal to its surroundings. The 550 white chairs with their white legs mostly translate the “white” in the liturgy in the main church hall. It ads to the clear and ordered feel to the interior design. For the facade we chose a mixed white-yellow brick with the brickwork in a “wild” pattern. Putting the building o a mound emphasizes the strong monolithic character of the building. With it’s sober and reluctant character, the building subordinates itself to it’s function: The modern church building.

Temporary Museum (Lake) I studio Anne Holtrop Heemskerk I The Netherlands I 2010

The drawings that were used to make the Temporary Museum (Lake) were made by chance. Not likeness or beauty is its key aspect, as in traditionalism; nor logic or ratio as in modernism; but rather “the possible” in the sense of what is merely conceivable, the idea that all things can be perceived and conceived differently. Chance struck me as a way of making work that does not reference to anything specific. But the mind of the viewer, like my mind, wishes to see things in them, like in a Rorschach inkblot. Jumping between different visions the mind projects its own ideas on it. Each construction, each gesture is a new reality. So is the use of one of these drawings to make the temporary museum.

Guest House I Doisamaisv arquitetos São Paulo I Brasil I 2012

The building was conceived as an addition to a pre-existing weekend house. The guest house was placed between a maple tree and a cypress, inserted perpendicularly to the main construction. It is situated in the outskirts of São Paulo, inside a residential condo. The largest tree marks the site´s center and the most vertical one its limit. Preserving the inner garden space, the view from the main house was kept unobstructed. Each program has its own façade and each façade its view. The bedrooms open up to the neighboring golf court, the office faces the lake, circulation leads to the garden, and the living room has the maple tree as backdrop. The surrounding vegetation plays an important role to the house. Because of it, the house cannot be seen from the street. It protects and shadows the glass pane. And from the inside, the window frames the giant tree. The central core, with four suites, has a concrete structure. Around it, an independent timber structure delimits gathering places and circulation. The roof trusses are only visible at the edges. Steel cables held by gusset plates attached to the peripheral pillars and over the frames are responsible for keeping them slim. House circulation is always through the porches and there is no distinction between front and back doors. Inside the building, one can feel the tranquil atmosphere of isolation, even being so close to the neighbors. It is just like being in a tree house without leaving the ground.

science park linz I caramel architekten Linz I Austria I 2012

This means establishing ties with the existing university campus, the adjacent residential buildings, and the natural surroundings and allowing a rapport between each of the new buildings as well as within the building units themselves. In a seemingly playful way the buildings interact both in plan and section with their surroundings and the adjacent residential buildings via height differences and bends and in this way avoid an inflexible building structure. By crouching into the slope and having the entrance area beneath the street level, they establish a ground-floor link to the existing university campus. The landscape flows into the grounds—between, over, and through the structures with their partially hovering office wings—and merges with the buildings, forming a new interpretation of the campus. The spacious interior atria tie the floors together and allow light to flood this space all the way down to the lower floors, in this way inspiring a new science-work climate of communication.

Karmeliterhof I LOVE architecture and urbanism Graz I Austria I 2011

The project is situated in the heart of Graz’s old town. The goals were to adapt and renovate the building and to add annexes that met the following objectives: Upgrade the façades both architecturally and thermally; Modernize and adapt the existing buildings; Enhance the building components connecting the buildings to form a closed, functioning complex. The existing building complex consisted of three buildings of very different construction quality and from different time periods (early baroque, late baroque, 1950s and 1960s). The following goals guided the design of the new buildings and the modifications made to the existing structures: Uncover and expose the valuable old building structure; Develop a new design to replace or incorporate the modifications from the 50s and 60s, which would link with the new construction to restore the valuable closed layout of the earlier design. The renovation was based on the Graz tradition, with its characteristic three-dimensional, “dynamic facades” (a special plastering technique) and typical “Grazerstock” windows which were re-interpreted with contemporary methods.

Headquarters of Helm AG I Störmer Murphy and Partners Hamburg I Germany I 2014

The headquarters of Helm AG are situated on Nordkanalstraße 28 in Hamburg. Together with the adjacent “Hanse-Haus” office block on Nordkanalstraße 29, the building forms an urban architectural ensemble. The buildings were constructed in 1964 respectively 1972 and are almost identical regarding the basic structure of their plan layout. The design principle of the existing façade as a window-band is largely maintained and accentuated with a new design motif. The contrast between the glass windows and the parapet strip is emphasised, whilst a newly added fold in the cladding adds an additional accentuation.

In the context of the reconstruction of the headquarters, a connecting bridge spanning across Nordkanalstraße will be constructed between both buildings on the second floor above the terrace level.

St . Sebastian—A church becomes a kindergarten I BOLLES + WILSON Münster I Germany I 2013

Not heritage listed, already condemned, the St. Sebastian church built in 1962 and deconsecratedin 2008 has been revitalized with the most lively and positive function, i.e. with children. The elegant elliptical form of the nave physically anchors its surrounding neighborhood. Two levels of kindergarten group rooms are housed within, the roofs of these become an all-weather play deck. Grass green impact-protection flooring and street lights give the play decks the ambience of an “outdoor space“. A grid of 50 x 50 cm unglazed openings, the only originally glazed light source in the church, provide constant, natural ventilation. Cold in winter, comfortably temperate in summer, but always dry, this magical “inside/outside space” is flooded with light. Adjacent to the kindergarten nave, a new street facing extension houses the main entrance, kitchen, offices, technical rooms and one multipurpose room. This is available for neighborhood events.

Seminar Building , University of Cologne I Architektubüro Paul Böhm Cologne I Germany I 2010

The new seminary building is located on campus the Cologne University Campus close to the auditorium and Albertus-Magnus-Square. Through the erecting of the building an urban space is created, which enhances the back warded situation around the auditorium area. The construction is set by open and closed structural components. Once you find the facilities seminary and effective in the more self-contained unit, there is be an open zone with core, waiting area and cafeteria. It also contains the student council and reading zone. These units are exposed by glass and define the buildings typical character. The edifice consists of four levels. Each floor is connected to the core by a central stairway and an elevator. Backwards the core one will find the emergency stairs. The main entrance on the lower level is located across the auditorium building in correspondence with the court yard and the neighboring buildings. An additional entrance to the auditorium this spot in the future is also being considered. On this level one can also find a conference room with an additional lobby, an information spot, seminary rooms, the student council and a cafeteria with outdoor terrace. The first and second floor layout is be erected in nearly similar shape. These floors contain each six seminary rooms, an area for pc-workstations and a reading zone. Some of the seminary rooms can be arranged in different size with partitions. The hall ways are being held as various waiting sectors for students.

De Monarch I KCAP Architects & Planners Den Haag I The Netherlands I 2012

De Monarch I is a renovated and extended inner-city office building of the 1960’s, located on the so-called Monarch location. This area is a new central business district at the entrance of the city, located at the highway A12, close to central station and two other railway stations. De Monarch I is the first of four office buildings to be realised on this location with a total of approximately 85.000 qm. It comprises of 18.000 qm office space on 16 storeys and two underground parking levels for 180 cars. It is used by CAK, the central administration office for the Dutch health sector. During renovation, the existing building has been stripped down to its mere structure, slightly extended and wrapped with a new façade. With its horizontality and increased transparency the aluminum façade interprets its predecessor and the surrounding modernist buildings in a contemporary way and re-integrates the building in the modern business area. The new façade fulfills highest sustainability standards and integrates nearly all installations such as ventilation, electricity, sun protection etc. The project has received the Dutch sustainability certificate BREEAM**** Excellent as first complex renovation project in the Netherlands.

Media Library I CFA COLBOC FRANZEN & ASSOCIÉS Montauban I France I 2013

A media library is a markpoint in the city. Individuality and division, discovered and training, exchange and contemplation. A media library is an urban place, a center of common life, concrete conception of a shared culture. A media library is also an adventure place. Stories there are discovered: our story, others’s stories, fantastic stories. As the terra cotta vases protected the first parchments, the media library contains our universe. The media library of Montauban seeks to be this place with multiple facets. It is installed on a particular site, emblematic of the city development. This site is in the centre of a crossing of various routes. Kneecap between the Southern district restructured and the Eastern districts, input signal of the city; strongpoint with the door of the district, the media library must assume a driving role on an urban scale and this exceptional site scale. The project suggested principal axes of the district and the city, that they materialize in its volumetry. Outside, the building reacts to the meaning directions. Inside, the user locates himself through the characteristic sights on the urban environment. It is integrated clearly in its environmental and regional context thanks to its materiality: ground. Essential material, anchored in the architectural tradition is declined on the media library in all its alternatives: thick walls protecting from noise and heat guaranteeing maximum comfort.

Offices In Via Zumbini I BINOCLE Milan I Italy I 2011