Anima astrologiae - William Lilly - ebook
Opis

Amongst those things that appertain to giving judgment in questions of Astrology, there are six to be considered: - 1st -Nations, and their particular kinds. 2nd Families, and the constitutions and ordinations of Families and Houses. 3rd - Rich and potent persons, Dispositions and affairs. 4th - Regard is to be had to the Individuals of human kind. 5th Elections or times proper for the beginning of any Work or Enterprise. 6th -Questions as well universal as particular, pertinent and fit to be demanded.

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William Lilly

Anima astrologiae

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Table of contents

Preface

ANIMA ASTROLOGIAE

OR A GUIDE FOR ASTROLOGERS

To The Ingenious Lovers Of Art

Proem

The Several Considerations Of Guido Bonatus

Of the several twenty-one Modes aforesaid, which are most strong Helpers, etc. and which strongest obstructs.

Notes

Preface

The history of western magic started about 4000 years ago. And since then it has been adding something to western magic. Originally, the Latin word magus nominated the followers of the spiritualist-priest class, and later originated to elect ‘clairvoyant, sorcerer’ and in a judgmental sense also ‘magician, trickster’. Thus, the initial meaning of the word ‘magic’ was the wisdoms of the Magi, that is the abilities of attaining supernatural powers and energy, while later it became practical critically to deceitful wizardry. The etymological descriptions specify three significant features in the expansion of the notion ‘magic’: 1) Magic as a discipline of celestial natural forces and in the course of formation 2) Magic as the exercise of such facts in divinations, visions and illusion 3) Fraudulent witchery. The latter belief played a significant part in the Christian demonization process. The growth of the western notion ‘magic’ directed to extensive assumptions in the demonological and astrophysical argument of the Neoplatonists. Their tactic was grounded on the philosophy of a hierarchically ordered outer space, where conferring to Plotinus (C205–C270 AD) a noetic ingredient was shaped as the outcome of eternal and countless radiation built on the ultimate opinion; this in its chance contributed to the rise of psychic constituent, which formed the basis of the factual world. Furthermore, these diverse phases of release came to be measured as convinced forces, which underneath the impact of innocent and evil views during late ancient times were embodied as humans. The hierarchical cosmos of Iamblichus simply demonstrates the legitimacy of this process. In his work, the Neoplatonic cosmology has initiated a channel through the syncretism distinctive of the late antiquity and in the essence of Greco-Oriental dualism. Superior productions are taken closer to inferior ones by various midway creatures. The higher the site of the mediators, the further they bear a resemblance to gods and whizzes; the minor they are, the nearer they stand to the psychic-spiritual part. The aforementioned group of intermediaries has been settled in order of series on the origin of cosmic gravity. Proclus (c410–485 AD) has described the system of magic origin conversed above in better aspect: in the hierarchical shackles of cosmic rudiments the power and nature of a firm star god disturbs everything mediocre, and with growing distance the impact slowly becomes weaker. The Humanists approached the Platonic notions from the outlook of the bequest of late antiquity, and were thus first familiarized to the Neoplatonic form of the doctrine. And since Ficino’s work has been inscribed in the spirit of emanation theory, and the author has been persuaded of the existence of the higher and lower spheres of magic and powers defined in Picatrix, he claims that planets and cosmic movements have much to do with power and magic spirit. Today’s occult marketplace also offers, in addition to books, multifarious paraphernalia for practicing magic: amulets, talismans, pendulums and magic rods. Though added with modern essentials and pseudoscientific advices to give some weight to the fundamentals, they are nothing but the leftovers of the western ethnicities of magic.

ANIMA ASTROLOGIAE

OR A GUIDE FOR ASTROLOGERS

To The Ingenious Lovers Of Art

We have formerly some thoughts of revising our Introduction to Astrology, now out of print, and to have enriched it from another edition with the choicest aphorisms, both from the writings of the ancients and our own many years’ experience, but the laboriousness of that work, considering our age and many infirmities of body, with the discouragements we have already me with from some ungrateful persons, caused us to lay aside (at least for the present) those intentions.Yet that we might not be wholly wanting to promote anything that might tend to the advancement of Art and gratification of its painful students, and knowing how necessary the ensuing Considerations of Guido Bonatus and Aphorisms adjoined, are to be known and regarded, which many of our ingenious countrymen could not do, for they have hitherto remained in the Latin tongue with the rest of the works of these authors in large volumes, difficult to be got at and too chargeable for man to buy, we therefore recommend them to a friend to be translated by themselves, which he has judiciously performed in plain significant language, so that we judge the work may deserve the title Anima Astrologiae which we have given it, comprehending the marrow and substance of Astrology, and much excellent matter necessary to be observed by all honest students that practice Art to discover truth and not to vapour with.We doubt not but the legitimate Sons and well-wishers of Urania will find considerable advantages from hence, directing them to a certainty in giving judgments upon all occasions, and they will for this publication have cause to thank their old friend.William LillyWalton-upon-Thames, 2 August, 1675.

Proem

Amongst those things that appertain to giving judgment in questions of Astrology, there are six to be considered: - 1st -Nations, and their particular kinds. 2nd Families, and the constitutions and ordinations of Families and Houses. 3rd - Rich and potent persons, Dispositions and affairs. 4th - Regard is to be had to the Individuals of human kind. 5th Elections or times proper for the beginning of any Work or Enterprise. 6th -Questions as well universal as particular, pertinent and fit to be demanded.But first of all there are some things necessary to be premised: As the fit manner of propounding a question, and divers other points to be observed in diving judgment. Of which sort of considerations we shall reckon up no fewer than One Hundred Forty and Six, which though ‘tis impossible they should happen or be so observed altogether; yet they all deserve to be known, and without them an Astrologer shall never be able to give true and perfect judgement. But before we treat distinctly of them it will be convenient to say a little of the right way or manner how a question should be proposed; for to judge of things to come is no easy task, nor indeed can it always be exactly performed; but we may come near the truth, and differ from it only in some small time or circumstances; which difficulty should not at all discourage us from studying and endeavouring to obtain as great a knowledge therein, as Human minds are capable of; for since inferiors are governed by superiors (as all agree), and that the nature and disposition of such superiors may be known by their motions, which arc now exactly found out by the learned in Astronomy; we may thence undoubtedly arrive at an ability of judging of things to come: That is declare what will happen by or from such their motions, and by consequence foretell future accidents; for this art has its peculiar rules and Aphorisms and its end in judgement, which takes off their objection who say that Astrology is nothing worth; for it would not be an Art, unless it had its proper precepts; but that it is an Art, we have sufficiently proved elsewhere, and the same is generally acknowledged; and its end is to give judgements as aforesaid, which are accidents imprinted on inferiors by the motions of the superior bodies and their qualities and effects in or upon the same.Thou art here presented with two choice pieces of Art in our mother tongue; the first, the Considerations of Guido Bonatus, a person no less happy in the practice than skillful in the theory of Astrology of which I will here give thee one instance as it is recorded by that eminent Historian Fulgusos, That Guido Earl of Mount-Serrant being besieged in that city, our Author Bonatus sent him word, that if such a day and hour he would make a sally on the enemies’ camp, he should give them an absolute defeat, and force them to raise their siege and quit the place, but should himself receive a dangerous (but not mortal) wound in the thigh. The Earl providing himself of all things necessary in case of a wound, and according to the prediction, though vastly inferior in numbers, obtained a most signal and entire victory, but following the pursuit was wounded in the place foretold, of which in short time he recovered.The second, consists of the choicest Aphorisms of Cardanus, a man famous to the learned world, and of whom the judicious and severe Scalier (though an adversary) in the preface to the book he wrote against him, gives a most respective and applauding character. These Aphorisms (by which is meant short comprehensive and approved rules of Art) were in the original delivered promiscuously, but I for better method have taken the pains here to marshal them under their distinct and proper titles, and that I might not unnecessarily charge the reader, have omitted such as seemed trivial or superfluous; this much I thought fit to premise, and have only more to add, that by reason of my absence some faults have escaped the press, besides those which myself may be chargeable with in the translation; the Reader will show his judgment in distinguishing, and his good nature in pardoning them.Henry Coley April 29, 1675

The Several Considerations Of Guido Bonatus

1. The 1st, is to observe what it is that moves a person to propose or ask a question of an Astrologer; where we must take notice of three motions: the First, of the mind, when a man is stirred up in his thoughts and bath an intent to enquire; a Second, of the superiour and celestial bodies; so that they at that time imprint on the thing enquired after, what shall become of it; the Third, of the free will which disposes him to the very act of enquiring; for although the mind be moved to enquire, ‘tis not enough unless the superiour bodies sympathize therewith; nor is such motion of the stars enough, unless by the election of his will the person does actually enquire.2. The 2nd consideration is (what we hinted at before) the method or manner everyone ought to observe that enquires of an Astrologer; which is, that when he intends to take an artist’s judgment of things past, present, or to come, he should, first, with a devout spirit, pray unto the Lord, from whom proceeds the success of every lawful enterprise, that he would grant him the knowledge of those things of the truth of which he would be resolved; and then let him apply himself to the astrologer with a serious intent of being satisfied in some certain and particular doubt, and this not on trifling occasions, or light sudden emotions, much less on matters base or unlawful, as many ignorant people used to do; but in matters of honest importance, and such as have possessed and disturbed his mind for the space of a day and night or longer; unless in sudden accidents which admit not of delay1.3. The 3rd, is to consider how many ways Planets operate upon Inferious Bodies according to the divers Qualities of their motions: there being Sixteen different ways of such their operations and effects in all things that are either wholly or in part perfected or destroyed.4. The 4th , is to consider particularly these several Sixteen ways, and what are the assisting causes that help forward things to perfection, and what there are that destroy things after they are perfected. Now of these the first(1) is Profection, or an advance of or in, things, which the philosophers call ‘Alchecohol.’(2) Detriment, which they call ‘Aliber.’ (3) Conjunction or Reversion, which they call ‘Alitifall.’ (4) Separation, which they call ‘Alnichirat.’ (5) Translation of light, which they call ‘Annecad.’ (6) Collection, which they call ‘Algemei.’ (7) Probition, which they call ‘Almana.’ (8) Reception, called ‘Alcobol.’ (9) Being void of course, called ‘Gastalcobal.’ (10). Permission, called ‘Galealocir.’ (11). The restoring or giving of virtue or disposition, called ‘Alteat.’ (12). The withdrawing of virtue, called Dalpha Alchoa.’ (13). The withdrawer or driver away of disposition, called ‘Daffaredbit.’ (14). Fortitude, ‘Alcoevah.’ (15). Debility, ‘Adirof. ’ (16) is the state of the Moon called ‘Gnaymel,’ or the Moon ill-affected; which the ancients generally hold to be of ill signification.