Wydawca: Olympia Press Kategoria: Dla dzieci i młodzieży Język: angielski Rok wydania: 2016

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Liczba stron: 47

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Opis ebooka Ancient Chinese Fables - Various

The golden age of Chinese fables was during the third and the fourth century B.C. This collection of ancient fables, broadly speaking, consists of those which are still in current use today in China. They are only a fraction of those written during the Warring States Period. There are many other ancient fables, embedded in classical works, which have been forgotten, but those presented here have stood the test of time.

Opinie o ebooku Ancient Chinese Fables - Various

Fragment ebooka Ancient Chinese Fables - Various

Table of Contents
Ancient Chinese Fables
FOREWORD
THE TOMTIT AND THE GIANT ROC
THE OINTMENT FOR CHAPPED HANDS
THE BIRD KILLED BY KINDNESS
LEARNING THE WRONG THING
THE ART OF CARVING DRAGONS
HOW TWO SHEPHERD BOYS LOST THEIR SHEEP
THE FROG IN THE WELL
THE CARP IN THE DRY RUT
THREE CHESTNUTS OR FOUR
SUSPICION
FELLING THE PLANE TREE
HOW THE FOOL MOVED MOUNTAINS
THE TITLE-DEED LOST ON THE ROAD
THE MAN WHO SAW NOBODY
PRESENTING DOVES
TOO MANY PATHS
THE PRINCE AND HIS BOW
PAINTING GHOSTS
IVORY CHOPSTICKS
THE DOG WHO SOURED WINE
WHY TSENG SHEN KILLED THE PIG
THE MAN WHO PRETENDED HE COULD PLAY REED PIPES
THE MAN WHO SOLD SPEARS AND SHIELDS
THE CRUMBLING WALL
A RECIPE FOR IMMORTALITY
WAITING FOR A HARE TO TURN UP
BUYING A PAIR OF SHOES
SELLING THE CASKET WITHOUT THE PEARLS
HOW TWO WATER SNAKES MOVED HOUSE
THE BOW AND THE ARROW
THE CONCEITED COACHMAN
THE LORD WHO LOVED DRAGONS
THE CHICKEN THIEF
HELPING YOUNG SHOOTS TO GROW
LEARNING TO PLAY DRAUGHTS
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FIFTY YARDS AND A HUNDRED
THE SNIPE AND THE MUSSEL
THE FOX WHO PROFITED BY THE TIGER'S MIGHT
THE RUMOUR ABOUT TSENG SHEN
THE WRONG DIRECTION
DRAWING A SNAKE WITH LEGS
BORROWING THE LIGHT
WHICH WAS THE MORE HANDSOME
BUYING A GOOD HORSE
THE CLAY FIGURE AND THE WOODEN IMAGE
MARKING THE BOAT TO LOCATE THE SWORD
STEALING THE BELL
THE SON OF A GOOD SWIMMER
PUNISHING THE HORSE
THE CLEVER OLD WOMAN
LAMENTING A MOTHER'S DEATH
THE BLIND MAN AND THE LAME MAN
WHO DESERVED THE PLACE OF HONOUR
THE OWL MOVES HIS HOUSE
THE USE OF PARABLES
A PARABLE ON STUDY
THE CICADA, THE PRAYING MANTIS AND THE SPARROW
THE DRAGON WHO CHANGED INTO A FISH
ON WEARING ARMOUR
THE FUR AND THE HIDE
THE REFLECTION OF THE BOW
THE PIG WITH THE WHITE HEAD
THE HOLY EEL

Ancient Chinese Fables

Various

This page copyright © 2007 Silk Pagoda.

 

FOREWORD

CHANG YU-LUAN

In ancient Chinese literature we find many fables. They have lived on for hundreds of years in men's hearts and, constantly on their lips, have become a precious part of our national heritage.

The golden age of Chinese fables was during the third and the fourth century B.C.

This was the era in Chinese history usually known as the Warring States Period, when society was undergoing rapid changes. Influenced by the spirit of the age, many different schools of thought flourished, resulting in great advances in culture and philosophy. The heritage of the past was studied, summarized, and recorded for posterity, and in these records some of the best and oldest fables were preserved.

Many works dating from the Warring States Period embody fables, outstanding examples being Lieh Tzu, Chuang Tzu, Mencius, Yin Wen Tzu, Han Fei Tzu, The Discourses of Lu Pu-wei and the Warring States Anecdotes.

During that period, fables proved extremely useful weapons in debate. Outstanding philosophers, politicians, or orators who wished to realize their ideals by political means, were expert in using them. Since they belonged to different schools of thought and had different political aims, there were constant clashes between them; therefore to gain their ends they made speeches, engaged in debates, and set down their views in writing. And, realizing that abstract ideas alone were not sufficient to defeat their rivals, they used fables to give substance to their thoughts and to prove the validity of their arguments. Thus most of the fables of the Warring States Period are interspersed among philosophic and political writings, which they illuminate.

This being the case, the fables of this period, whether written to elucidate certain ideas or to praise or censure specific actions, all have a definite purpose.

And yet, the ideas, characters and incidents in these fables have universal validity. For instance, when Mencius told the story of the chicken thief he had a particular example in mind, a certain minister of the state of Sung who would not put an end to unreasonable taxation; but the moral applies to all those who see their own mistakes yet refuse to mend their ways. Similarly, “The Fox Who Profited by the Tiger's Might” was used by Chiang Yi, a minister of the state of Chu, to criticize another minister. Later generations, however, have used this tale to describe those who rely on the power of others to oppress the people.

This collection of ancient fables, broadly speaking, consists of those which are still in current use today in China. They are only a fraction of those written during the Warring States Period. There are many other ancient fables, embedded in classical works, which have been forgotten, but those presented here have stood the test of time.