Tao Te Ching - Laozi - ebook
Kategoria: Nauka i nowe technologie Język: angielski

Tao Te Ching darmowy ebook

Laozi

5 (3)
0,00 zł
Do koszyka

Ebooka przeczytasz na:

tablecie w aplikacji Legimi
smartfonie w aplikacji Legimi
komputerze w aplikacji Legimi
Czytaj w chmurze®
w aplikacjach Legimi.
Dlaczego warto?

Pobierz fragment dostosowany na:

Zabezpieczenie: DRM

Opis ebooka Tao Te Ching - Laozi

The Tao Te Ching is fundamental to the Taoist school of Chinese philosophy and strongly influenced other schools, such as Legalism and Neo-Confucianism. This ancient book is also central in Chinese religion, not only for Taoism but Chinese Buddhism, which when first introduced into China was largely interpreted through the use of Taoist words and concepts. Many Chinese artists, including poets, painters, calligraphers, and even gardeners have used the Tao Te Ching as a source of inspiration. Its influence has also spread widely outside East Asia, aided by hundreds of translations into Western languages.

Opinie o ebooku Tao Te Ching - Laozi

Cytaty z ebooka Tao Te Ching - Laozi

When we renounce learning we have no troubles. The (ready) 'yes,' and (flattering) 'yea;'— Small is the difference they display. But mark their issues, good and ill;— What space the gulf between shall fill?
The partial becomes complete; the crooked, straight; the empty, full; the worn out, new. He whose (desires) are few gets them; he whose (desires) are many goes astray.   Therefore the sage holds in his embrace the one thing (of humility), and manifests it to all the world. He is free from self- display, and therefore he shines; from self-assertion, and therefore he is distinguished; from self-boasting, and therefore his merit is acknowledged; from self-complacency, and therefore he acquires superiority. It is because he is thus free from striving that therefore no one in the world is able to strive with him.
In the same way the sage is always skilful at saving men, and so he does not cast away any man; he is always skilful at saving things, and so he does not cast away anything. This is called 'Hiding the light of his procedure.'   Therefore the man of skill is a master (to be looked up to) by him who has not the skill; and he who has not the skill is the helper of (the reputation of) him who has the skill.
If the one did not honour his master, and the other did not rejoice in his helper, an (observer), though intelligent, might greatly err about them. This is called 'The utmost degree of mystery.'
The unwrought material, when divided and distributed, forms vessels. The sage, when employed, becomes the Head of all the Officers (of government); and in his greatest regulations he employs no violent measures.
He who would assist a lord of men in harmony with the Tao will not assert his mastery in the kingdom by force of arms. Such a course is sure to meet with its proper return.
In the highest antiquity, (the people) did not know that there were (their rulers). In the next age they loved them and praised them. In the next they feared them; in the next they despised them.
When the Great Tao (Way or Method) ceased to be observed, benevolence and righteousness came into vogue. (Then) appeared wisdom and shrewdness, and there ensued great hypocrisy.
A state may be ruled by (measures of) correction; weapons of war may be used with crafty dexterity; (but) the kingdom is made one's own (only) by freedom from action and purpose.
How do I know that it is so? By these facts:— In the kingdom the multiplication of prohibitive enactments increases the poverty of the people; the more implements to add to their profit that the people have, the greater disorder is there in the state and clan; the more acts of crafty dexterity that men possess, the more do strange contrivances appear; the more display there is of legislation, the more thieves and robbers there are.
The great state only wishes to unite men together and nourish them; a small state only wishes to be received by, and to serve, the other. Each gets what it desires, but the great state must learn to abase itself.
The difficulty in governing the people arises from their having much knowledge. He who (tries to) govern a state by his wisdom is a scourge to it; while he who does not (try to) do so is a blessing.
Therefore (to guard against this), the sage keeps the left-hand portion of the record of the engagement, and does not insist on the (speedy) fulfilment of it by the other party.
In a little state with a small population, I would so order it, that, though there were individuals with the abilities of ten or a hundred men, there should be no employment of them;
Therefore the sage puts his own person last, and yet it is found in the foremost place; he treats his person as if it were foreign to him, and yet that person is preserved.

Fragment ebooka Tao Te Ching - Laozi

About
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
About Laozi:

Laozi was an ancient Chinese philosopher. According to Chinese tradition, Laozi lived in the 6th century BC, however many historians contend that Laozi actually lived in the 4th century BC, which was the period of Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Period, while others contend he was a mythical figure. Laozi was credited with writing the seminal Taoist work, the Tao Te Ching, which was originally known as the Laozi. Taishang Laojun was a title for Laozi in the Taoist religion. It refers to One of the Three Pure Ones. Source: Wikipedia

Note: This book is brought to you by Feedbooks
http://www.feedbooks.com
Strictly for personal use, do not use this file for commercial purposes.

1

The Tao that can be described is not the enduring and unchanging Tao.

The name that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging name.

 

(Conceived of as) having no name, it is the Originator of heaven and earth;

(conceived of as) having a name, it is the Mother of all things.

 

Always without desire we must be found,

If its deep mystery we would sound;

But if desire always within us be,

Its outer fringe is all that we shall see.

 

Under these two aspects, it is really the same; but as development takes place, it receives the different names.

Together we call them the Mystery.

Where the Mystery is the deepest is the gate of all that is subtle and wonderful.


2

All in the world know the beauty of the beautiful, and in doing this they have (the idea of) what ugliness is;

they all know the skill of the skilful, and in doing this they have (the idea of) what the want of skill is.

 

So it is that existence and non-existence give birth the one to (the idea of) the other;

that difficulty and ease produce the one (the idea of) the other;

that length and shortness fashion out the one the figure of the other;

that (the ideas of) height and lowness arise from the contrast of the one with the other;

that the musical notes and tones become harmonious through the relation of one with another; and that being before and behind give the idea of one following another.

 

Therefore the sage manages affairs without doing anything, and conveys his instructions without the use of speech.

 

All things spring up, and there is not one which declines to show itself;

they grow, and there is no claim made for their ownership;

they go through their processes, and there is no expectation (of a reward for the results).

The work is accomplished, and there is no resting in it (as an achievement).

 

The work is done, but how no one can see;

'Tis this that makes the power not cease to be.


3

Not to value and employ men of superior ability is the way to keep the people from rivalry among themselves;

not to prize articles which are difficult to procure is the way to keep them from becoming thieves;

not to show them what is likely to excite their desires is the way to keep their minds from disorder.

 

Therefore the sage, in the exercise of his government, empties their minds, fills their bellies, weakens their wills, and strengthens their bones.

 

He constantly (tries to) keep them without knowledge and without desire, and where there are those who have knowledge, to keep them from presuming to act (on it).

When there is this abstinence from action, good order is universal.


4

The Tao is (like) the emptiness of a vessel; and in our employment of it we must be on our guard against all fulness.

How deep and unfathomable it is, as if it were the Honoured Ancestor of all things!

 

We should blunt our sharp points, and unravel the complications of things; we should attemper our brightness, and bring ourselves into agreement with the obscurity of others.

How pure and still the Tao is, as if it would ever so continue!

 

I do not know whose son it is.

It might appear to have been before God.


5

Heaven and earth do not act from (the impulse of) any wish to be benevolent; they deal with all things as the dogs of grass are dealt with.

The sages do not act from (any wish to be) benevolent; they deal with the people as the dogs of grass are dealt with.

 

May not the space between heaven and earth be compared to a bellows?

 

'Tis emptied, yet it loses not its power;

'Tis moved again, and sends forth air the more.

Much speech to swift exhaustion lead we see;

Your inner being guard, and keep it free.


6

The valley spirit dies not, aye the same;

The female mystery thus do we name.

Its gate, from which at first they issued forth,

Is called the root from which grew heaven and earth.

Long and unbroken does its power remain,

Used gently, and without the touch of pain.


7

Heaven is long-enduring and earth continues long.

The reason why heaven and earth are able to endure and continue thus long is because they do not live of, or for, themselves.

This is how they are able to continue and endure.

 

Therefore the sage puts his own person last, and yet it is found in the foremost place; he treats his person as if it were foreign to him, and yet that person is preserved.

Is it not because he has no personal and private ends, that therefore such ends are realised?


8

The highest excellence is like (that of) water.

The excellence of water appears in its benefiting all things, and in its occupying, without striving (to the contrary), the low place which all men dislike.

Hence (its way) is near to (that of) the Tao.

 

The excellence of a residence is in (the suitability of) the place;

that of the mind is in abysmal stillness;

that of associations is in their being with the virtuous;

that of government is in its securing good order;

that of (the conduct of) affairs is in its ability;

and that of (the initiation of) any movement is in its timeliness.

 

And when (one with the highest excellence) does not wrangle (about his low position), no one finds fault with him.


9

It is better to leave a vessel unfilled, than to attempt to carry it when it is full.

If you keep feeling a point that has been sharpened, the point cannot long preserve its sharpness.

 

When gold and jade fill the hall, their possessor cannot keep them safe.

When wealth and honours lead to arrogancy, this brings its evil on itself.

When the work is done, and one's name is becoming distinguished, to withdraw into obscurity is the way of Heaven.